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Columbia Gas Transmission

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BUSINESS
March 28, 1996
Dockworkers approve cutting costs to keep cargo coming to portIn an unprecedented move, dockworkers at the port of Baltimore voted overwhelmingly last night to cut their labor costs to retain cargo shipments that were otherwise certain to shift to Philadelphia.The historic meeting at the International Longshoremen's Association hiring hall in Highlandtown was called because William Schonowski, president of ILA Local 333, agreed to reduce the size of work gangs scheduled to unload a major shipment of steel due here next week from Belgium.
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2014
A West Virginia-based gas company is suing dozens of landowners in Baltimore and Harford counties to gain use of portions of their properties for a $180 million pipeline project. In three federal lawsuits filed since January, Columbia Gas Transmission seeks to invoke eminent domain to obtain temporary or permanent easements on more than 400 acres for its 21-mile pipeline extension. The project, which gained approval from federal regulators last November, has sparked concern among neighbors about safety, environmental issues and property values.
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2014
A West Virginia-based gas company is suing dozens of landowners in Baltimore and Harford counties to gain use of portions of their properties for a $180 million pipeline project. In three federal lawsuits filed since January, Columbia Gas Transmission seeks to invoke eminent domain to obtain temporary or permanent easements on more than 400 acres for its 21-mile pipeline extension. The project, which gained approval from federal regulators last November, has sparked concern among neighbors about safety, environmental issues and property values.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 1, 2014
Environmental activists warn that construction of a 21-mile natural gas pipeline through northern Baltimore and Harford counties could affect the region's drinking-water system, as the $180 million project cuts across more than three dozen streams feeding into Loch Raven Reservoir. Theaux Le Gardeur, executive director of the Gunpowder Riverkeeper, has petitioned the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to reconsider its approval of the pipeline last month and order a more detailed review of the project's environmental effects.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 1, 2014
Environmental activists warn that construction of a 21-mile natural gas pipeline through northern Baltimore and Harford counties could affect the region's drinking-water system, as the $180 million project cuts across more than three dozen streams feeding into Loch Raven Reservoir. Theaux Le Gardeur, executive director of the Gunpowder Riverkeeper, has petitioned the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to reconsider its approval of the pipeline last month and order a more detailed review of the project's environmental effects.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2012
Columbia Gas Transmission's underground pipeline runs alongside David Raymond's house in Cockeysville today, as it did when he bought the place 30 years ago, quietly delivering natural gas to Baltimore County and beyond without incident. Still, Raymond stands with dozens of others - including the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, state legislators and the Gunpowder Riverkeeper - raising questions about or in opposition to a proposed 21.4-mile line running along much the same route from Owings Mills to Fallston.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2013
Columbia Gas Transmission said Monday that it expects to begin work on a 21-mile pipeline through Baltimore and Harford counties next year after winning federal approval for the $180 million project, which drew heated opposition from neighbors. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission authorized the company to extend an existing line from Owings Mills to Fallston, built largely alongside another line. Columbia Gas said the project would improve safety and reliability because it would provide a backup method for transporting natural gas when the other line needed repairs.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2013
Advocates for Oregon Ridge Park warn construction of a gas pipeline planned to cut through Baltimore County's largest park will destroy acres of forest and could disrupt wildlife and pollute a popular swimming lake. "Essentially, we're losing a part of the park," said Jim Curtis of the Oregon Ridge Nature Center Council, as he hiked recently through the park that is home to oak, beech, hickory and other types of trees. Construction is set to begin in April on the 21-mile Columbia Gas Transmission pipeline through Baltimore and Harford counties, a project the company says is needed to modernize the delivery of natural gas. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission gave approval to the $180 million project last month.
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | April 20, 2012
The following letter was sent to local elected officials and a copy was provided for publication. Regarding the Columbia Gas Transmission Line, Referred to as the Line MB Loop, I am writing to you with safety, environmental and home value concerns relative to the above proposed line. Columbia Gas Transmission is either unwilling or has not authorized representatives to answer any of our hard questions. The issues as we see it are as follows: There is an existing eight-inch non pressurized line approximately 150 yards from our house.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark | February 4, 1992
Columbia Gas Transmission Corp., a Wilmington, Del.-based gas pipeline company that filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection last summer, has applied for federal permission to drop its natural gas prices 22 percent.Columbia, which got caught in a financial bind after promising to pay high prices to its gas suppliers, has canceled its high-priced contracts and is attempting to pass its savings on to customers, including Baltimore Gas and Electric Co., Columbia officials said yesterday.Columbia and its parent, Columbia Gas System Inc., filed for bankruptcy protection after failing to win concessions from banks and natural gas suppliers.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2013
Advocates for Oregon Ridge Park warn construction of a gas pipeline planned to cut through Baltimore County's largest park will destroy acres of forest and could disrupt wildlife and pollute a popular swimming lake. "Essentially, we're losing a part of the park," said Jim Curtis of the Oregon Ridge Nature Center Council, as he hiked recently through the park that is home to oak, beech, hickory and other types of trees. Construction is set to begin in April on the 21-mile Columbia Gas Transmission pipeline through Baltimore and Harford counties, a project the company says is needed to modernize the delivery of natural gas. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission gave approval to the $180 million project last month.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2013
Columbia Gas Transmission said Monday that it expects to begin work on a 21-mile pipeline through Baltimore and Harford counties next year after winning federal approval for the $180 million project, which drew heated opposition from neighbors. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission authorized the company to extend an existing line from Owings Mills to Fallston, built largely alongside another line. Columbia Gas said the project would improve safety and reliability because it would provide a backup method for transporting natural gas when the other line needed repairs.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2012
Columbia Gas Transmission's underground pipeline runs alongside David Raymond's house in Cockeysville today, as it did when he bought the place 30 years ago, quietly delivering natural gas to Baltimore County and beyond without incident. Still, Raymond stands with dozens of others - including the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, state legislators and the Gunpowder Riverkeeper - raising questions about or in opposition to a proposed 21.4-mile line running along much the same route from Owings Mills to Fallston.
BUSINESS
March 28, 1996
Dockworkers approve cutting costs to keep cargo coming to portIn an unprecedented move, dockworkers at the port of Baltimore voted overwhelmingly last night to cut their labor costs to retain cargo shipments that were otherwise certain to shift to Philadelphia.The historic meeting at the International Longshoremen's Association hiring hall in Highlandtown was called because William Schonowski, president of ILA Local 333, agreed to reduce the size of work gangs scheduled to unload a major shipment of steel due here next week from Belgium.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2012
ON THE SITE... Second fatal accident in recent days on Jarrettsville Pike : An unidentified victim died at the scene of a crash Sunday night, the fourth person to die on the same stretch of road since Friday. Canton fire shows gaps in information for responders : Firefighters were initially unaware that 8,000 gallons of dangerous chemicals were inside a burning warehouse April 22 because it lacks a unified database of potential hazards. Preakness weather forecast brightens again : AccuWeather is predicting a high of 80 degrees and mostly sunny skies May 19. Loyola earns top overall seed in NCAA men's lacrosse tournament :  The 14-1 Greyhounds, who captured their first Eastern College Athletic Conference tournament crown, will meet Canisius in the first round.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2013
Crews have finished the final phase of Dolfield Boulevard in Owings Mills, connecting Reisterstown Road with Lakeside Boulevard. The last half-mile of the four-lane highway opened to traffic this week with a ceremony by Baltimore County officials. They say the road -- which runs from I-795 to Reisterstown Road -- opened a year ahead of schedule and will help divert traffic from many residential streets. "Thanks to this project, not only will Owings Mills be easier to drive through, but now people can commute to work and run errands without creating congestion on their neighbors' streets," County Executive Kevin Kamenetz said in a statement.
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