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By LARRY STURGILL | September 30, 1992
As we head into the fall season, leaves aren't be the only thing changing in Howard County. There also has been a dramatic change in The Sun. The introduction of the new Howard County edition is a major step in providing county residents with daily local news coverage, along with state, national and world news.One significant improvement to local coverage is the addition of community correspondents like myself. As a county native and a Columbia resident for 15 years, I'm thrilled at the opportunity to be actively involved in this new journalistic venture.
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EXPLORE
July 17, 2012
Although I serve on the Columbia Association Board of Directors, I write this letter as an individual interested in the future of Columbia and Symphony Woods. Your article regarding the Planning Board's review of CA's plans for Symphony Woods seems to crystallize the various considerations that come into play when executing a democratically deliberative process for designing a park. I hope it is clear to the community that CA staff and the Board of Directors have spent many hours walking the line between rejuvenation and preservation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | February 26, 1998
Michael Frayn's "Noises Off" is the ultimate backstage comedy, the Murphy's Law of farces, a show about a British touring company struggling valiantly to stage -- what else? -- a farce. Columbia Community Players' production of this dauntingly fast-paced comedy opens a three-weekend run tomorrow.Bob Russell directs a cast including Stephen Bruun, Dave Gamble, Mo Dutterer, John Parry, Conni Ross, Amy Smith, Katie Thompson and Sharon Templeton.Columbia Community Players performs at Slayton House in Wilde Lake Village Green, Twin Rivers Road and Lynx Lane, Columbia.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2011
The stories still circulate about Columbia pioneers sitting around kitchen tables in the city's formative years, deciding which human services agencies would take root in the fertile ground that was rural Howard County in the early 1960s, says Anne Towne. Out of that hotbed of activism sprang the Association of Community Services, an initiative founded in 1963 as "an organization that looks after other organizations," said Towne, who has led the umbrella group since 2001. Now, as she prepares to step down Wednesday after a decade as executive director, Towne believes the economic downturn that's been gripping the country will continue to alter the human services landscape for years to come.
FEATURES
By Karin Remesch | November 23, 1998
Carroll Players. "Exit the Body." 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Nov. 30 and Dec. 2 at VFW Post 467 in Westminster. Needed are four women, 30s to 50s; one woman, late teens to 20s; three men, 30s to 50s; two men, 20s-30s. Be prepared to read from the script. Technical people and backstage help also needed. Call 410-876-2220.Columbia Community Players. Thornton Wilder's "Skin of Our Teeth." 7 p.m. Sunday and next Monday at Faulkner Ridge Neighborhood Center in Columbia. More than 30 cast members needed.
NEWS
August 25, 1994
Democrats in Howard County's councilmanic District 4 have a difficult choice to make in the Sept. 13 primary. The two candidates, James B. Kraft and Mary C. Lorsung, boast impressive credentials, not to mention fairly similar views on the issues. Both also have the backing of other prominent county Democrats; Councilman C. Vernon Gray is supporting Mr. Kraft and departing Councilman Paul R. Farragut endorses Ms. Lorsung.Because of her extensive experience with direct community service, The Sun's endorsement also goes to Ms. Lorsung.
NEWS
June 9, 2000
IMAGE, says the camera ad, is everything. True enough if you're selling cameras. But often image is a surface thing. In these pages yesterday, readers saw a picture of former Columbia Association President Deborah O. McCarty walking out of her rented Columbia townhouse, a moving man nearby and a minivan with Georgia plates parked in front. Ms. McCarty's troubles as the $130,000-a-year head of government in Columbia deepened when people learned she hadn't registered her car in Maryland, had sold her house and wasn't registered to vote.
NEWS
March 1, 2006
Scholarship deadline extended The Columbia Association's board of directors has extended the deadline for the Spirit of Columbia Scholarship Award to March 15. The program provides up to six $2,500 scholarships each year to graduating high school seniors who have shown exceptional effort in serving the community. Eligible students must attend a Howard County public or private school, live in Columbia or have a parent working full time on Columbia Association- assessed property, maintain at least a "C" average in school; and have a history of voluntary service to the Columbia community.
EXPLORE
July 17, 2012
Although I serve on the Columbia Association Board of Directors, I write this letter as an individual interested in the future of Columbia and Symphony Woods. Your article regarding the Planning Board's review of CA's plans for Symphony Woods seems to crystallize the various considerations that come into play when executing a democratically deliberative process for designing a park. I hope it is clear to the community that CA staff and the Board of Directors have spent many hours walking the line between rejuvenation and preservation.
NEWS
October 21, 2007
Hospice of Howard County will hold its annual fundraiser, the Taste & Auction of Howard County, from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. today at Turf Valley Resort in Ellicott City. The event's theme will be Caribbean Dreamin' and will feature a steel-drum band, auction items and food provided by 20 Howard County restaurants. A 50/50 raffle and a raffle for a 2007 Mustang convertible are also planned. Honorary co-chairs for the event are County Executive Ken Ulman and his wife, Jaki. Tickets are $85 at the door.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2010
Twenty-nine year old Lauran Miller was happy to see a well-dressed crowd gather Wednesday to ceremonially begin demolition at east Columbia's Guilford Gardens, a three-decade old, 100-unit public housing community where she lives with her husband and two children. "I think I'm pretty excited. This is a big change," the six-year resident said about the $43 million redevelopment that will offer 269 mixed income units with rents ranging from $360 to $1,700 a month. Howard County executive Ken Ulman renamed the community Monarch Mills, and the first new units should be ready by early next year, according to officials of Shelter Development.
NEWS
October 21, 2007
Hospice of Howard County will hold its annual fundraiser, the Taste & Auction of Howard County, from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. today at Turf Valley Resort in Ellicott City. The event's theme will be Caribbean Dreamin' and will feature a steel-drum band, auction items and food provided by 20 Howard County restaurants. A 50/50 raffle and a raffle for a 2007 Mustang convertible are also planned. Honorary co-chairs for the event are County Executive Ken Ulman and his wife, Jaki. Tickets are $85 at the door.
NEWS
March 5, 2006
Food drive being held through Saturday Harvest for the Hungry, the U.S. Postal Service, Boy Scouts and other partners are sponsoring the annual Harvest for the Hungry Letter Carrier Week Food Drive through Saturday. Residents can leave a bag of nonperishable food items by their mailboxes, and Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts and letter carriers will collect and process it. The food will be delivered to a local food bank. Food can also be dropped off in marked containers at post offices or at Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage offices.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | April 26, 2004
A row of nine houses behind the Dorsey's Search Village Center will soon become a luxury townhouse complex incorporated into the Columbia community, the developer said. In a few weeks, J. Chris Pippen of Ellicott City will begin to process plans to construct 96 high-end homes on 8.3 acres to be called Dorsey Crossing, he said at a recent community meeting. The evolution of this residential project from the original proposal to build a gas station and shops reflects months of discussion and negotiation with residents of Dorsey's Search.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | April 4, 2004
Decked out in school colors and wearing buttons that read "Don't hide the pride," students and staff at Columbia's Oakland Mills High School put on a grand show last week during a pep rally. Students stomped their feet in the bleachers, boys cheered, girls danced and the band rocked. But for some, there was an undercurrent of sadness. Morale is "getting better, but it's still not where it was," said junior Amy Adler, who helped organize the Thursday rally designed to close wounds that stubbornly refuse to heal.
NEWS
By Rona S. Hirsch and Rona S. Hirsch,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 21, 2003
In between the festive Hebrew music and dancing, elegant dinner and warm tributes, Siegfried Rowe welcomed old friends. As a founder of Howard County's Jewish community and Columbia Jewish Congregation, there were many hands to shake at a gala testimonial and fund-raiser sponsored in his honor Saturday evening at Oakland Mills Meeting House. "His contributions to us are so numerous, we thought it was time to say `thank you' for his generosity and hard work," said the congregation's rabbi, Sonya Starr.
NEWS
By LARRY STURGILL | October 21, 1992
The depth of the rift between the Columbia Association board and many residents of the Running Brook community over the proposed Fairway Hills golf course was again exposed at a sometimes heated Oct. 4 meeting at Slayton House.The potential danger to residents, especially those living on Whetstone Road and Ten Mills Road whose homes will adjoin the fairways, is a major concern. The use of designated open space, and the destruction of woodlands and wetlands necessary to construct the course also remain as objections.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | April 26, 2004
A row of nine houses behind the Dorsey's Search Village Center will soon become a luxury townhouse complex incorporated into the Columbia community, the developer said. In a few weeks, J. Chris Pippen of Ellicott City will begin to process plans to construct 96 high-end homes on 8.3 acres to be called Dorsey Crossing, he said at a recent community meeting. The evolution of this residential project from the original proposal to build a gas station and shops reflects months of discussion and negotiation with residents of Dorsey's Search.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2002
As a brand-new town catering to young families, Columbia boasted swimming pools, playgrounds and schools galore. Hardly anybody noticed what was missing: a cemetery, nursing homes, senior housing. "Who needs a cemetery when you're 30?" said Marshall Donley, 69, who moved to the planned community 30 years ago as the father of two preschoolers. Thirty-five years after it was conceived as a young person's paradise, Columbia is growing grayer by the day. And the unmet needs of its surging senior population - set to more than triple during the next 25 years - suddenly are on a lot of people's minds.
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