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By Natalie Harvey and Natalie Harvey,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 24, 1996
HAPPY HOLIDAYS to everyone. May the new year bring happiness, good health and challenges.Plans for the 1997 Columbia Art Festival are well under way. A call for artisan entries has gone out.All fine-art and craft artists are eligible to apply for a booth for the festival June 27-29 near Lake Kittamaqundi at Columbia's Town Center.Residence in Maryland is not a requirement.Many of the previous participants have developed a following of customers who attend the festival annually, so applications and booth assignments are decided by a jury.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | November 25, 2013
Although Eileen Williams works in fabric and Deborah Berman works in paper collage, these two artists share a collage-oriented artistic sensibility in their separate exhibits at the Columbia Art Center. Williams calls her show "Celebration of Women Through Faces in Fabric. " Her wall-hanging fabric panels incorporate various materials, designs and cultural references, but they have in common Williams' inclusion of female masks that would be suitable for a costume ball. These masks are prominently featured in some of her panels, but in other panels the masks are nearly submerged beneath all of the other clustered and layered forms.
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NEWS
By Rona Hirsch and Rona Hirsch,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | October 8, 1995
Walking into Columbia Art Center's newest gallery is like standing in front of a giant refrigerator door.From colorful scrawls to hand-painted tiles of African elephants, the room's walls, tables and floors shimmer with children's artwork."
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | April 24, 2013
Art and poetry support a worthy cause in the group exhibit "Haiku for Hope," which is co-sponsored by the Columbia Art Center and Howard County Promotion and Tourism's Blossoms of Hope and Cherrybration. Proceeds go toward Howard County General Hospital's Claudia Mayer Cancer Resource Center. Each artwork has an accompanying short poem that reinforces its inspirational themes. That inspiration generally is found in nature and, more specifically, a number of the artists and poets respond to the cherry blossoms that cheerfully light up the landscape in April.
NEWS
By SANDY ALEXANDER | February 29, 2008
The three-line haikus took only a few seconds to read out loud, but as people read the poems off index cards at the Columbia Art Center Monday evening, they elicited thoughtful nods, a few "ahhh's" and some appreciative laughs. Haiku might seem easy, and it is often one of the first types of poetry taught in elementary school, said the discussion leader, Tim Singleton. But it can be very expressive, he said. "It is very little, but it does big things," he said. The evening, which combined Singleton's talking about the history of the Japanese poetry form with audience comments and questions, was the first of what organizers from Little Patuxent Review magazine and the art center hope will be a series of monthly art-themed salons.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1996
We sit and rock and lounge on chairs. We recline and kneel and doze. Now, dozens of Columbia artists are taking chairs beyond the sedentary: They are using chairs for art.Best of all, the chairs are cardboard.In an unusual project designed to attract creative folks of all ages and types, the Columbia Art Center in east Columbia's Long Reach village has invited artists to decorate cardboard chairs any way they see fit.The project is called "Reserved Seating," and more than 40 people -- collage artists, finger-painters, sculptors and crayon masters -- have signed up.The artists say they are inspired by the functional cardboard, designed to support up to 250 pounds.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2002
Now that Thomasine Spore of Ellicott City is retired from being a full-time teacher, she can spend more time being a student - and an artist. Spore was an art teacher for many years, retiring from Owings Mills Elementary in 2000 after 22 years in the Baltimore County school system. During summers and other free time, she enjoyed switching roles to take art classes and workshops, as well as exhibiting her work in the Baltimore area. "You learn new things all the time," Spore said. "I like that."
NEWS
January 12, 2007
Women's art -- Columbia Art Center Galleries, 6100 Foreland Garth, Columbia, are presenting A Woman's Eye, a juried exhibition of work by members of the Women's Caucus for Art of Greater Washington and Watercolor Artists of the Columbia Art Center, an invitational exhibition curated by artist and teacher Robert Coe, through Jan. 31. A reception will be held from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Jan. 20. Gallery hours are from 9 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 9...
NEWS
April 20, 1995
Rebecca Bafford of Washington has been named director of the Columbia Art Center in Long Reach.Ms. Bafford, who has a master's in fine arts from George Washington University, is the logistics coordinator there. She has taught ceramics to children at the Perception Art School in Washington.POLICE LOG* Oakland Mills: 9000 block of Red Branch Road: Someone pried open the rear door of Hazmat Training Services on Sunday and stole a computer, police said.
NEWS
November 30, 1992
Art center to display Russian worksRussian artists Genady and Elena Zolotnitsky will be the guests of honor at a 6 p.m. reception Thursday marking the opening of an exhibit of their paintings at the Columbia Art Center in Long Reach Village. The public is invited.Both artists were educated at the Moscow State College of the Arts, Mr. Zolotnitsky in Fine Arts and Mrs. Zolotnitsky in Cinematography and Fine Arts.Mr. Zolotnitsky's works have been exhibited in Moscow, Israel and Poland. Mrs. Zolotnitsky's paintings have been on display in Moscow and Rome.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | November 23, 2012
You can make a case that the vases in "Triple Vision" are meant to be admired as much as used. The three artists showcased in this Columbia Art Center exhibit make vases, platters and other ceramic objects that often have whimsical shapes or surface decoration. Although Pam Hannasch and Dick Roepke generally make functional pieces, they also have playful tendencies. As for Scott McNabb, well, his nonfunctional ceramic art can be used to generate a smile. It's nice to walk around the gallery and see how these three distinctive artistic identities are shaped; however, some of their pieces are displayed on such low pedestals that it's rather awkward to try looking at them.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | April 18, 2012
Art is good for the soul, but it's also good for the soles in the Columbia Art Center exhibit "A Walk in My Shoes. " Speaking of good, this show is co-sponsored by Howard County Promotion and Tourism's Blossoms of Hope and Cherrybration. Proceeds benefit the Claudia Mayer Cancer Resource Center of Howard County General Hospital. This thematically oriented exhibit has two main categories of subject matter: flowers and shoes. Sometimes they appear in the same artwork, as in Sally Stevens' photograph "Happy Feet.
EXPLORE
July 7, 2011
Listings are accepted on a space-available basis. Deadline is 5 p.m. Thursday prior to date of publication at the latest. To submit contest items, mail to Contests, Patuxent Publishing Co. Editorial, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, MD 21278; email hccalendar@patuxent.com ; fax 410-332-6336; or call 410-332-6497. Columbia Art Center Call for Entries — Seeking entries for its annual theme, "Umbrella Exhibition," to be held as part of Columbia International Day, July 23, 2 p.m.-sunset, Lake Kittamaqundi, in Columbia.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2011
At first glance, the installation in one corner of the Columbia Art Center gallery in Long Reach conjures up images of sails and, well, sales. Six white vinyl tablecloths are knitted together by rows assembled from 300 plastic shopping bags, and the resulting billowy curtain hangs from the ceiling to the floor. The curtain arcs around a large, nestlike sculpture of handmade paper, created from shredded junk mail and suspended by fishing line. Dangling over and lying under this nest are single curled strips of textured packing paper.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | June 11, 2009
Chicago City Limits, the New York-based comedy troupe that will be bringing its act to the Columbia Festival of the Arts on Tuesday, asks only one thing of its audience: Do your homework. "Our entire show is improvisation and therefore based on suggestions we get from the audience," says Greg Triggs, a member of the troupe's touring company for the past 2 1/2 years. "We ask the audience for ideas, which become the foundation for that night's show." So come prepared with suggestions outlandish enough to challenge these hardened comedy veterans.
NEWS
March 22, 2009
Events planned at Columbia library The east Columbia branch library, 6600 Cradlerock Way, will be the venue for the Civil Law Self-Help Center from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. April 1 and 15. The center is open twice a month to provide free legal assistance to self-represented litigants in Howard County. Walk-ins are welcomed. Information: 410-313-2135. The East Columbia Chess Club, with instruction by experienced players (including a chess master) meets at 3:30 p.m. April 2 and 16. Players of all ages and experience are welcome.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | August 31, 2006
`Hair' today The lowdown -- More than 50 artists from around the country will have paintings, photographs, mixed media, collages, sculptures and ceramics in the Columbia Art Center's Hair: A Juried Exhibition. The two-dimensional and three-dimensional works celebrate hair in all its puffs, curls and tangles. If you go -- Hair: A Juried Exhibition runs through Oct. 8 at the Columbia Art Center, 6100 Foreland Garth in Columbia. A gala reception is 6 p.m.-8 p.m. Sept. 16. Gallery is open 9 a.m.-9:30 p.m. Mondays-Thursdays, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and noon-5 p.m. Sundays.
NEWS
January 11, 2009
The Columbia Art Center Galleries and Little Patuxent Review will present a program on "Native American Traditions and Healing Ceremonies," with artist, author and dancer Henry E. Niese, from 7:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Jan. 19 at the art center, 6100 Foreland Garth, in the Long Reach Village Center. Admission is free, and reservations are not required. The presentation is part of a continuing series sponsored by Little Patuxent Review and Columbia Art Center Galleries. Information: 410-730-0075, or visit www.columbiaartcenter.
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