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By Andrew Gumbel | February 27, 2000
SAN FRANCISCO -- Every Sunday for the past 29 years, a storefront church in the heart of San Francisco has swayed to the mellifluous tones and odd rhythms of jazz legend John Coltrane, in the name of divine worship. The music is not a prop but the very key to the Almighty. For this is no ordinary house of God, but the St. John Coltrane African Orthodox Church, the first place on earth to turn a jazz saxophone player into an object of religious devotion. Jazz fans have been quietly coming for years, as have local aficionados bedazzled by the mystic allure of Coltranes sleeve notes for his 1964 album, A Love Supreme.
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NEWS
January 27, 2013
On Thursday, Carroll County Commissioner Haven Shoemaker, who has quite possibly the most ironic first name since Roscoe P. Coltrane named his Basset Hound "Flash" (Dukes of Carroll?), said, "Throughout our history, we have had waves of immigrants coming to this country and they have all assimilated to use a common language, and I think that's why we've become the world's leading superpower. " ("Carroll names English its official language," Jan. 25.) Let's be honest. "Official language" is really a euphemism for keeping Carroll County as homogeneous as possible.
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NEWS
June 2, 2006
Jazz tribute -- Ruby Glover, nicknamed Baltimore's "godmother of jazz," will perform at 10:30 a.m. Sunday, during the annual Garden Party and Tribute to American Jazz at Epiphany Chapel and Church House. The chapel is located at 1419 Odenton Road, Odenton. Jim Ballard, nephew of John Coltrane, and Chris Haley, nephew of author Alex Haley, will provide musical accompaniment. The event is free. 410-336-8383.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2009
SATURDAY THIEVERY CORPORATION: D.C.-based DJs Eric Hilton and Rob Garza usually keep their live shows interesting by bringing musicians from their label, ESL Music, on stage. So you can look for lots of special guests and music from the duo's latest release, "Radio Retaliation." Thievery Corporation performs at Pier Six Pavilion, 731 Eastern Ave., at 5:30 p.m. Tickets are $25-$65. Go to ticketmaster.com. MARYLAND WINE FESTIVAL: Grab a designated driver and your wine notes journal: You're in for abundant samples from Maryland's wineries, including Basignani Winery, Boordy Vineyards, Cygnus Wine Cellars, Elk Run Vineyards, Fiore Winery, Woodhall Wine Cellars and dozens more.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | April 11, 2000
When the Miles Davis box set "Quintet 1965-1968" was released in 1998, critics referred to that group -- Davis on trumpet, saxophonist Wayne Shorter, pianist Herbie Hancock, bassist Ron Carter and drummer Tony Williams -- as the second great Davis Quintet. The first, as the scribes pointed out, was the band Davis formed in late 1955, featuring tenor saxophonist John Coltrane, pianist Red Garland, bassist Paul Chambers, and drummer Philly Joe Jones. That was the group that defined the sound of late '50s hard bop, thanks to such classic recordings as "Milestones," "On Green Dolphin Street" and the immortal "Round Midnight."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2004
Drummer Elvin Jones was the great propelling force that drove the John Coltrane quartet into vast new territories of jazz, territories that new generations of musicians are still exploring . He was a drummer of inexhaustible energy - physically, emotionally and spiritually - which was a very good thing indeed, because Coltrane could play for hours, wringing the last scrap of meaning from a musical idea. Jones played with Coltrane from 1960 to 1966, an extraordinarily fertile time for jazz music.
ENTERTAINMENT
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 6, 2005
NEW YORK - There is Charlie Parker's King alto saxophone, with mother-of-pearl keys, his primary horn in the 1950s. There is Benny Goodman's clarinet, John Coltrane's soprano and tenor saxophones, Gerry Mulligan's baritone. Thelonious Monk's tailored jacket. A ribald letter from Louis Armstrong to his manager. One of Ornette Coleman's notebooks from the late 1950s, with his practice exercises and, on one of the last pages, one of his greatest compositions, "Focus on Sanity," written in pencil.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik | September 18, 1997
If you never saw the original on A&E, you won't think ABC's "Cracker" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) is all that bad. But be warned, if you were a fan of the British version starring Robbie Coltrane, it will make you ill.Robert Pastorelli, from "Murphy Brown," has the sorry task of trying to replace Coltrane as Gerry "Fitz" Fitzgerald, the police psychologist who solves cases no one else can because he is every bit as troubled and out of control as...
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | October 30, 1992
LIVEAC/DC (Atco 92212)theory, a live album ought to be the easiest kind to make, since the only thing to worry about is making sure the microphones are on. So why aren't more concert recordings as accurate or energetic as AC/DC's latest, the aptly titled "Live"? Some of the credit no doubt belongs with producer Bruce Fairbairn, who keeps the guitars crisp and the drums punchy, and it obviously doesn't hurt that the set list includes all of the band's best-loved material, from "Highway to Hell" to the recent "Thunderstruck."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | January 20, 1995
SECOND COMINGThe Stone Roses (Geffen 24503)Considering how eagerly awaited their sophomore album has been, it's no wonder the Stone Roses cheekily dubbed the disc "Second Coming." After spending time with the album, though, it's hard not to think that a more appropriate title would have been "Anticlimax." Some of that has to do with the fact that the band's trippy, R&B-inflected rock no longer sounds as radical or inventive as it did six years ago, when the band made its initial impact. Far more damaging, though, is the Roses' decision to emphasize groove over melody, because the band's rhythm section is neither strong nor interesting enough to carry an entire album.
NEWS
By [MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN] | January 14, 2007
I'm a pretty boring guy" is how David T. Terry, 37, describes himself. Well, he is married (to wife Alisia) with two kids, a boy and a girl. Normal, but not boring. He's also got a stillnew job leading Maryland's largest African-American historical museum. Challenging, but not boring. And if Terry could have any car he wanted, he would drive an atomic orange sports car that goes really fast. Definitely not boring. 1 Disney cruise for my family "My job keeps me here a lot of the time. My kids are generally asleep when I get home.
NEWS
June 26, 2006
Murl E. "Gene" Coplin Jr., a Korean War veteran who worked for the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services for three decades, died Wednesday at St. Agnes Hospital of heart failure and complications from diabetes. He was 74. A lifelong city resident, Mr. Coplin was born in Harlem Park in West Baltimore and graduated in 1950 from Frederick Douglass High School, where he competed in track. In 1960, he graduated from what is now Morgan State University with a degree in business administration.
NEWS
June 2, 2006
Jazz tribute -- Ruby Glover, nicknamed Baltimore's "godmother of jazz," will perform at 10:30 a.m. Sunday, during the annual Garden Party and Tribute to American Jazz at Epiphany Chapel and Church House. The chapel is located at 1419 Odenton Road, Odenton. Jim Ballard, nephew of John Coltrane, and Chris Haley, nephew of author Alex Haley, will provide musical accompaniment. The event is free. 410-336-8383.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | March 16, 2006
She was sharp in heels and black leather pants that hugged her curves. The haircut was sassy: golden blond, cut in layers, tapered in the back. As the band kicked into a bluesy groove, she closed her eyes, moaned into the microphone and patted her rocking hips in time with the beat. That was about four years ago at the Blue Note in New York. And Karrin Allyson, one of the best vocalists working in jazz today, was on that night, delivering subtle blues numbers, airy ballads and Brazilian love songs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | December 29, 2005
Generally speaking, pop in 2005 wasn't as conventional as it had been the previous year. But it wasn't entirely thrilling, either. In 2004, pop audiences mostly gravitated toward full, warm productions with echoes of the past. Alicia Keys' unabashedly old-fashioned The Diary of Alicia Keys and Ray Charles' tepid duets album, Genius Loves Company, were huge hits last year. But the best musical moments of '05 achieved more with less. The usually rowdy Ying Yang Twins, for instance, literally brought things down to a whisper on the nasty "Wait (The Whisper Song)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2005
Saxophonist Dave Liebman's journey of exploration through the jazz universe and beyond was launched when he was a teen-ager in Brooklyn and discovered John Coltrane at the height of his powers. "I wouldn't have this life I've had for 35 years if it wasn't for Coltrane, seeing him live," Liebman says during a phone conversation. "I still would have loved music, I'm sure. I might have played saxophone. But I certainly don't think I ever would have thought that this is something serious to get engaged in if I had not seen Coltrane in front of my eyes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2005
Saxophonist Dave Liebman's journey of exploration through the jazz universe and beyond was launched when he was a teen-ager in Brooklyn and discovered John Coltrane at the height of his powers. "I wouldn't have this life I've had for 35 years if it wasn't for Coltrane, seeing him live," Liebman says during a phone conversation. "I still would have loved music, I'm sure. I might have played saxophone. But I certainly don't think I ever would have thought that this is something serious to get engaged in if I had not seen Coltrane in front of my eyes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 6, 2005
NEW YORK - There is Charlie Parker's King alto saxophone, with mother-of-pearl keys, his primary horn in the 1950s. There is Benny Goodman's clarinet, John Coltrane's soprano and tenor saxophones, Gerry Mulligan's baritone. Thelonious Monk's tailored jacket. A ribald letter from Louis Armstrong to his manager. One of Ornette Coleman's notebooks from the late 1950s, with his practice exercises and, on one of the last pages, one of his greatest compositions, "Focus on Sanity," written in pencil.
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