Advertisement
HomeCollectionsColorectal Cancer
IN THE NEWS

Colorectal Cancer

FEATURED ARTICLES
EXPLORE
March 5, 2013
March is observed across the nation as Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. Many survivors, patients, caregivers and others whose lives have been affected by colorectal cancer come together to generate awareness of the importance of getting screened and also encouraging loved ones to get screened. According to the American Cancer Society, excluding skin cancers, colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosed in men and women in the United States. In 2013, the American Cancer Society estimates 102,480 new cases of colon cancer and 40,340 new cases of rectal cancer will be reported.
ARTICLES BY DATE
EXPLORE
March 5, 2013
March is observed across the nation as Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. Many survivors, patients, caregivers and others whose lives have been affected by colorectal cancer come together to generate awareness of the importance of getting screened and also encouraging loved ones to get screened. According to the American Cancer Society, excluding skin cancers, colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosed in men and women in the United States. In 2013, the American Cancer Society estimates 102,480 new cases of colon cancer and 40,340 new cases of rectal cancer will be reported.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2012
Carol Carr showed all the signs of colorectal cancer seven years ago, but doctors thought the 44-year-old Glen Burnie woman was too young to have the disease and never tested her for it. Instead, they said her diarrhea, vomiting, cramping, iron deficiency and extreme fatigue were more likely caused by the flu, anxiety and even a brain disorder. Treatments for those illnesses failed and Carr got so sick she had to stop working. When she finally saw a specialist who ordered a colonoscopy she was suffering from Stage II colorectal cancer.
NEWS
September 20, 2012
Blood drive Baltimore Washington Medical Center will host an American Red Cross blood drive from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Oct. 20 at 301 Hospital Drive in Glen Burnie. The bloodmobile will be located near the BW Federal Credit Union. For information, call the American Red Cross at 866-236-3276. To schedule an appointment, call the BWMC marketing and communications department at 410-787-4367. Weight and wellness The University of Maryland Center for Weight Management and Wellness will offer a free seminar from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Oct. 17 in the Leo and Lysbeth Courtney Conference Center at BWMC, 305 Hospital Drive in Glen Burnie.
NEWS
By Newsday | August 15, 1994
A new study has found evidence that regular aspirin use reduces the risk of getting colorectal cancer, but researchers say there are still too many questions for them to recommend taking it regularly."
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 2, 1998
When she was 15, Claire Elizabeth Brady was diagnosed with colorectal cancer and was given a 1-in-100 chance of surviving.Until she died July 26 of a brain tumor at her Severna Park home, Claire E. Brady LeCompte, 70, who had worn a colostomy bag as a result of life-saving surgery 55 years earlier, made it her life's work to comfort, educate and inspire those similarly afflicted.She taught by example that it was possible to lead a normal life and triumph over the disease that for years was known as the "cancer no one talks about."
NEWS
August 2, 2012
Carol Carr's diagnosis of colorectal cancer at age 44 ("Colon cancer rises for young," July 30) underscores the point that even though current national guidelines for average risk individuals call for colon screening to start at age 50, there are important exceptions. Anyone experiencing symptoms like Ms. Carr's should talk to a gastroenterologist. African-Americans fall into a high-risk category and are another exception to the rule to start screening at age 50. The American College of Gastroenterology in its official screening guidelines recommends that African-Americans should start younger - at age 45 - because they face a higher incidence of colorectal cancer generally, have more cancers in the right side of the colon, as well as potentially more aggressive tumors.
NEWS
By Delthia Ricks and Delthia Ricks,NEWSDAY | May 26, 2005
Statins, the popular medications used to control cholesterol and stave off heart attacks, appear to reduce the risk of colorectal cancer, researchers are to report today. The finding by researchers at the University of Michigan is part of a growing number of studies that are pinpointing new roles for the most widely prescribed class of drugs in the United States. Globally, statins, which include Zocor, Lipitor, Crestor and Pravachol, account for an estimated $20 billion in annual sales.
NEWS
By Delthia Ricks and Delthia Ricks,NEWSDAY | July 15, 2003
Arthritis remedy Celebrex can boost the effectiveness of chemotherapy for lung cancer, shrinking tumors and cutting off their blood supply, Manhattan scientists will report in a study published today. The small research project, which involved 29 patients with the most common form of the cancer, marks the first time the widely used arthritis medication has proved effective against active tumors. Previous studies suggested it can inhibit cancer development before it starts. In 1999, the Food and Drug Administration licensed Celebrex as a preventive for patients with a rare genetic condition in which pre-cancerous polyps develop into colorectal cancer.
NEWS
By Douglas M. Birch and Douglas M. Birch,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 26, 1997
In what the nation's chief of gene research is calling a landmark discovery, Johns Hopkins scientists say they have found a genetic mutation that causes one of the most common forms of cancer.And they've developed a test that, they say, could help save tens of thousands of lives.Dr. Bert Vogelstein said yesterday that he and two other researchers have identified a genetic mutation, shared by about 700,000 Jews of European descent, that appears to cause a common disease called familial colorectal cancer.
NEWS
August 2, 2012
Carol Carr's diagnosis of colorectal cancer at age 44 ("Colon cancer rises for young," July 30) underscores the point that even though current national guidelines for average risk individuals call for colon screening to start at age 50, there are important exceptions. Anyone experiencing symptoms like Ms. Carr's should talk to a gastroenterologist. African-Americans fall into a high-risk category and are another exception to the rule to start screening at age 50. The American College of Gastroenterology in its official screening guidelines recommends that African-Americans should start younger - at age 45 - because they face a higher incidence of colorectal cancer generally, have more cancers in the right side of the colon, as well as potentially more aggressive tumors.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2012
Carol Carr showed all the signs of colorectal cancer seven years ago, but doctors thought the 44-year-old Glen Burnie woman was too young to have the disease and never tested her for it. Instead, they said her diarrhea, vomiting, cramping, iron deficiency and extreme fatigue were more likely caused by the flu, anxiety and even a brain disorder. Treatments for those illnesses failed and Carr got so sick she had to stop working. When she finally saw a specialist who ordered a colonoscopy she was suffering from Stage II colorectal cancer.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | January 27, 2012
The percentage of Americans screened for cancer isn't meeting national targets, and the numbers are even worse for minorities, according the first federal study looking at disparities among Asiand and Hispanic groups. The report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Cancer Institute showed breast cancer screening rates were 72.4 percent, below the 81 percent target set in a national health plan called Healthy People 2020.  It was 83 percent for cervical cancer, missing the 93p ercent mark, and colorectal screening was 58.6 percent, missing hte 70.5 percent target.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2011
Ryan Hanley spent the summer before he turned 18 thinking about organizing a transcontinental bike ride to raise money for cancer. When he entered the Johns Hopkins University, he set about selling the idea and recruiting classmates and friends to ride 4,000 miles. The maiden effort that he had dubbed 4K for Cancer — which raised $80,000 in 2002 in memory of Hanley's father, who had died of cancer when Hanley was 13 — operated under the university's auspices for five years before becoming an independent nonprofit organization.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | May 5, 2009
Anne Talbot Brennan, a longtime litigator with the Baltimore law firm of Whiteford, Taylor & Preston and a colorectal cancer activist, died Saturday of the disease at her home in Phoenix, Baltimore County. She was 50. Anne Talbot Hardy was born in Baltimore and raised in Lutherville and Long Green Valley. After graduating from John Carroll School, she earned a bachelor's degree from the University of Virginia in 1980. Mrs. Brennan began her career as a litigator at Whiteford, Taylor & Preston after graduating from the University of Baltimore School of Law in 1984.
NEWS
By CYNTHIA TUCKER | April 3, 2006
ATLANTA -- My mother didn't quite know what to do with some of my father's mementos. The decor of her new house wouldn't accommodate all of his treasures, including the head of a 10-point buck he had proudly mounted. So I brought it home with me, along with one of his Army uniforms. My decor (such as it is) doesn't exactly accommodate mounted animal heads, either. Nor would I find such a display an easy thing to explain to my friends, since I live in a camouflage-free Atlanta neighborhood with, I suspect, zero National Rifle Association memberships.
NEWS
By New York Times | March 5, 1992
New research suggests that a screening technique in which doctors use instruments to view the colon and rectum may greatly reduce the risk of death from cancers that arise there.But researchers found that the tests need be performed only every 10 years, rebutting arguments by some health organizations that patients should be tested every three to five years.Although some experts raised cautions about the design of the study, reported in to day's New England Journal of Medicine, they also said it was one of the most comprehensive efforts to settle a long-standing controversy over the usefulness of the test, called sigmoidoscopy.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | March 10, 1993
A much-touted, widely used stool-screening test is an ineffective, unreliable method for detecting colon cancer, researchers at the Mayo Clinic say.In a study involving more than 13,000 patients, researchers at the Mayo Institute, based in Rochester, Minn., found that the popular Hemoccult test failed to detect more than 70 percent of colorectal cancers and more than 90 percent of polyps found in follow-up exams.Researchers also looked at another test, HemoQuant, which is more sensitive in detecting fecal blood.
NEWS
By Delthia Ricks and Delthia Ricks,NEWSDAY | May 26, 2005
Statins, the popular medications used to control cholesterol and stave off heart attacks, appear to reduce the risk of colorectal cancer, researchers are to report today. The finding by researchers at the University of Michigan is part of a growing number of studies that are pinpointing new roles for the most widely prescribed class of drugs in the United States. Globally, statins, which include Zocor, Lipitor, Crestor and Pravachol, account for an estimated $20 billion in annual sales.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.