Advertisement
HomeCollectionsColorectal
IN THE NEWS

Colorectal

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,Contributing Writer | April 27, 1993
While his is certainly not the most glamorous specialty in medicine, Dr. Howard Keith Berg declares, "I enjoy doing what I'm doing" because his work "can have a tremendous impact on the quality of a person's life."Dr. Berg knew early in his studies that he might devote his medical career to treating problems of the colon, rectum and anus. "Throughout medical school I enjoyed the field," he said.This month Dr. Berg was granted full staff privileges as a specialist in colorectal surgery at Carroll County General Hospital.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 29, 2014
HPV vaccine The department of health provides free HPV vaccine for both males and females ages 9 to 26 at the following clinics. Call to make an appointment. •Glen Burnie Health Center, 416 A Street, SW, Glen Burnie, 410-222-6633 •Parole Health Center, 1950 Drew Street, Annapolis, 410-222-7247 Additional information visit aahealth.org or the department's immunizations services office 410-222-4986. Breast cancer awareness The Department of Health's Learn to Live program is offering a free women's health kit that includes information on breast cancer screenings, nutrition and other women's health topics.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Delthia Ricks and Delthia Ricks,NEWSDAY | July 7, 2004
People who drank about two 8-ounce glasses of milk a day had a 15 percent reduction in risk of getting colorectal cancer, according to a study that seems to redeem the benefits of a much maligned beverage. The new analysis from researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital and the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston comes as science continues to search for foods that may play a role in health and disease. Milk, in recent years, has been implicated as a trigger of other forms of cancer.
EXPLORE
March 5, 2013
March is observed across the nation as Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. Many survivors, patients, caregivers and others whose lives have been affected by colorectal cancer come together to generate awareness of the importance of getting screened and also encouraging loved ones to get screened. According to the American Cancer Society, excluding skin cancers, colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosed in men and women in the United States. In 2013, the American Cancer Society estimates 102,480 new cases of colon cancer and 40,340 new cases of rectal cancer will be reported.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2001
For weeks after she noticed the first symptoms - bleeding and abdominal pain - Agnes G. Turpin, poor and uninsured, didn't go to the doctor. When the pain got to be too much, the Essex resident went to a hospital and then a clinic, where they told her she needed a colonoscopy but wouldn't give her the cancer screening test because she had no insurance. While his wife was with the doctor at the clinic, Broderick M. Turpin was looking through reading material in the waiting room. A green pamphlet with the word "cancer" on it caught his eye, and he took it home.
NEWS
By JONATHAN BOR and JONATHAN BOR,SUN REPORTER | December 14, 2005
People who eat high-fiber diets run a lower risk of colorectal cancer than those who don't -- but it's probably not the fiber that's protecting them, scientists reported today in one of the largest studies of the subject. Researchers seeking to resolve one of the most debated issues in cancer prevention found that colorectal cancers were 16 percent less common among people consuming the most fiber than among those getting the least. But the advantage probably comes from other healthy lifestyle choices made by fiber eaters, who also tend to smoke less, exercise more, avoid red meats and consume more fruits, vegetables, whole grains, calcium and folic acid.
NEWS
February 3, 2002
IF YOU'RE over 50, Johns Hopkins may be your new best friend. Scientists at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center reported this week that they have developed a test for colorectal cancer that would significantly reduce the number of people who have to undergo colonoscopies. The test is expected to be available for widespread use in three to five years. According to a study published in The New England Journal of Medicine on Thursday, the test requires a patient to submit a stool sample for genetic testing, and only those who test positive using the new procedure would have to undergo a colonoscopy.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | May 5, 2009
Anne Talbot Brennan, a longtime litigator with the Baltimore law firm of Whiteford, Taylor & Preston and a colorectal cancer activist, died Saturday of the disease at her home in Phoenix, Baltimore County. She was 50. Anne Talbot Hardy was born in Baltimore and raised in Lutherville and Long Green Valley. After graduating from John Carroll School, she earned a bachelor's degree from the University of Virginia in 1980. Mrs. Brennan began her career as a litigator at Whiteford, Taylor & Preston after graduating from the University of Baltimore School of Law in 1984.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2005
As millions of Americans fill their plates with protein-rich steak and burgers rather than carb-heavy pasta or potatoes, researchers are reporting the strongest evidence yet that eating a lot of red meat increases the risk of colorectal cancer. Those who ate the equivalent of a hamburger a day were about 30 percent to 40 percent more likely to develop cancer of the colon or rectum than those who ate less than half that amount. Long-term consumption of high amounts of processed meat such as hot dogs increased the risk of colon cancer by 50 percent.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2001
Armed with nearly $16 million from the national tobacco settlement, health officials are launching a statewide blitz to fight a silent, often overlooked, killer: colorectal cancer. As public awareness and screening programs take shape this year, Marylanders - whether sitting in church, surfing the Internet or talking with a neighbor - can expect a swarm of messages about a cancer that is the second-deadliest in the state. "Our mission is simple: We've got to save lives," Dr. Ebenezer Israel, St. Mary's County health officer, said of the campaigns, which will be run by local health departments.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2012
Carol Carr showed all the signs of colorectal cancer seven years ago, but doctors thought the 44-year-old Glen Burnie woman was too young to have the disease and never tested her for it. Instead, they said her diarrhea, vomiting, cramping, iron deficiency and extreme fatigue were more likely caused by the flu, anxiety and even a brain disorder. Treatments for those illnesses failed and Carr got so sick she had to stop working. When she finally saw a specialist who ordered a colonoscopy she was suffering from Stage II colorectal cancer.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | May 5, 2009
Anne Talbot Brennan, a longtime litigator with the Baltimore law firm of Whiteford, Taylor & Preston and a colorectal cancer activist, died Saturday of the disease at her home in Phoenix, Baltimore County. She was 50. Anne Talbot Hardy was born in Baltimore and raised in Lutherville and Long Green Valley. After graduating from John Carroll School, she earned a bachelor's degree from the University of Virginia in 1980. Mrs. Brennan began her career as a litigator at Whiteford, Taylor & Preston after graduating from the University of Baltimore School of Law in 1984.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 4, 2008
People with a family history of colon cancer carry the emotional burden of knowing that they have twice the risk of developing the disease themselves. But a new study might ease some of their anxiety. Patients with a family history of colon cancer, the researchers found, are also more likely to survive it. The paradox, being published today in The Journal of the American Medical Association, could steer researchers toward new treatments and a better understanding of the disease. An estimated 153,000 cases of colon and rectal cancer will be diagnosed in the United States in 2008, according to the American Cancer Society, and about 50,000 people will die of it. Studies of twins show that about 35 percent of colon cancers are inherited, and about 11 percent of patients have at least two close relatives with the disease.
NEWS
March 5, 2008
Program aids grocery shoppers Lauer's Supermarket, 8095A Edwin Raynor Blvd. in Pasadena, will join the Anne Arundel County Department of Health's Learn to Live program to sponsor a Good Food For Good Health Weekend from Friday to Sunday. The program helps consumers select nutritious low-fat, high-fiber foods at the supermarket. Shoppers can visit nutrition booths staffed by health educators and take home bags containing free healthful recipes, brochures and a magnet. Good Food for Good Health Weekend hours at Lauer's are 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Friday; 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday; and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday.
NEWS
October 7, 2007
The American Cancer Society is sponsoring a "Look Good, Feel Better" program for cancer patients at 6 p.m. Tuesday at Upper Chesapeake Medical Center. The program provides guidance on makeup and hairstyling techniques that counter the effects of treatment. Information: 800-515-0044. Colorectal cancer support group Upper Chesapeake Health will offer a support group for people affected by colorectal cancer at 7 p.m. Wednesday at Upper Chesapeake Medical Center, third-floor conference room.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | June 29, 2003
Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr., who has repeatedly sparred with the County Council since taking office, has now drawn council members' ire for diverting advertising money to star in skin cancer awareness ads. The critical council members accuse Smith of misusing a $950,000 advertising contract. The council had approved spending the $950,000 on advertisements to raise awareness of colorectal cancer, but Smith used nearly $212,000 of the funding to appear in ads that aired 634 times on television and radio about skin cancer, according to a county auditor memo.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 18, 2002
FOR THE SECOND year in a row, Brock Yetso is organizing a 5K run/walk and 25K bike ride to help fight colon cancer, the disease that claimed his mother, Marilyn. Yetso's mother died in March 2000, less than a month after she was found to have stage IV colon cancer. "About a month before she went into the hospital, she started feeling like she had the flu," Yetso said. "They did a scan and said she had a tumor in her colon ... and from there it was just extremely quick." Yetso, 25, was already involved in cancer awareness when his mother became sick.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.