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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
It was three years ago -- it only seems like 13 -- in June that I launched Midweek Madness, a good enough excuse to offer an encore of the inaugural posting and the perfect way to celebrate the first full week of summer. Here is the fab Mari Lynn, self-proclaimed coloratura soprano and musicologist, veering off her usual heilige kunst to destroy, I mean, deliver Gershwin's "Summertime. " If you can't endure all of it, don't miss the very end of the performance.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
It was three years ago -- it only seems like 13 -- in June that I launched Midweek Madness, a good enough excuse to offer an encore of the inaugural posting and the perfect way to celebrate the first full week of summer. Here is the fab Mari Lynn, self-proclaimed coloratura soprano and musicologist, veering off her usual heilige kunst to destroy, I mean, deliver Gershwin's "Summertime. " If you can't endure all of it, don't miss the very end of the performance.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2013
Sad to hear about Deanna Durbin's death this week at the age of 91. The Winnipeg-born Hollywood actress and singer was a terrific talent whose 1930s and '40s movies earned her enormous popularity (my late father was one of her biggest fans). Deanna Durbin became nearly as famous for her extraordinary retirement from show business in 1949 -- giving up everything to move to France with her third husband. She remained basically secluded for the rest of her long life. At the risk of seeming inappropriate, I thought you wouldn't mind if I devoted this installment of my Midweek Madness featurette to this endearing artist, especially since this clip manages to capture her operatic ability, charm and comedic flair all in one. This is a scene from her last film, "The Love of Mary" (1948)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2013
Sad to hear about Deanna Durbin's death this week at the age of 91. The Winnipeg-born Hollywood actress and singer was a terrific talent whose 1930s and '40s movies earned her enormous popularity (my late father was one of her biggest fans). Deanna Durbin became nearly as famous for her extraordinary retirement from show business in 1949 -- giving up everything to move to France with her third husband. She remained basically secluded for the rest of her long life. At the risk of seeming inappropriate, I thought you wouldn't mind if I devoted this installment of my Midweek Madness featurette to this endearing artist, especially since this clip manages to capture her operatic ability, charm and comedic flair all in one. This is a scene from her last film, "The Love of Mary" (1948)
NEWS
February 13, 1994
The dismissal last week of superstar soprano Kathleen Battle from the Metropolitan Opera Company for "unprofessional conduct" is sure to ignite lively controversy among fiercely partisan devotees. Ms. Battle, 45, is one of the classical music world's biggest stars, right up there with Luciano Pavarotti and Placido Domingo. Observers are rightly comparing her tiff with Met General Manager Joseph Volpe to the famous rift that developed between diva Maria Callas and Met boss Rudolph Bing more than a quarter-century ago.Ms.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2002
Marguerite A. Mergehenn, a music teacher, vocalist and pianist, died in her sleep Tuesday at the Charlestown Retirement Community in Catonsville. She was 97. She played musical accompaniment for silent movies during the 1920s, sang on WBAL-Radio in the 1930s and, at the end of her life, performed with the Charles Tones Band at Charlestown. Mrs. Mergehenn taught piano and voice for 50 years, beginning in 1946 in a studio in her Hunting Ridge home, and later in Catonsville, where she moved in 1955.
FEATURES
By Karin Remesch | November 9, 1998
Annapolis Opera. "Tosca," performance in November 1999, and an opera concert, spring of 2000. Needed are spinto soprano, coloratura soprano, mezzo soprano, Puccini tenor, lyric tenor, baritone and bass. Friday-Saturday. To register for audition, call 410-383-8597 between 9 a.m. and 9 p.m.Pasadena Theatre Company. "Godspell." Cast members needed, also director, stage manager, off-stage help. Send resume to the theater company at P.O. Box 1801, Glen Burnie 21060-1801. Call 410-969-1801.Theatre on the Hill.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | September 23, 1991
Gary Karr, long regarded as a leading double bass player and playing the instrument of the legendary Serge Koussevitzky, performs Sunday, Sept. 29, here in the first concert of a free new classical music series by winners and advisers of the annual Rosa Ponselle International Competition.Pianist Harmon Lewis will accompany Karr in the 7:30 p.m. concert at Kraushaar Auditorium, Goucher College. Admission is free but you are advised to call the foundation at 486-4616 to reserve tickets.Also performing will be coloratura soprano Cheryl Parrish, recipient of the foundation's Hazel Ann Fox Award, and tenor John Weber, winner of a joint foundation-Richard Tucker Music Foundation Award.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 18, 1997
The Annapolis Chorale's "Celebration of Christmas" concert Friday featured some rarely heard works by the chorale and the Chamber Chorus and from the Chamber Orchestra, a range of music from Handel's "Messiah" to Leroy Anderson's "Sleigh Ride."The Chamber Orchestra played the classical works beautifully and brought to such familiar songs as "Silver Bells" and "I'll Be Home for Christmas" a lush fullness associated with much larger groups.When he opened his arms wide, Ernest Green pressed the orchestra to express all those warm sentiments of the season.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 5, 1998
The finals of Annapolis Opera's 10th annual Maryland Vocal Competition, held at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts Sunday afternoon, were proof that the local company is attracting high-caliber talent.Of the eight finalists, who had to be living or studying in Maryland to be eligible for the competition, five are high-quality singers, and there were things to like about the other three. Each of the three top finishers could have been named the winner with ample justification. It was that close.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2002
Marguerite A. Mergehenn, a music teacher, vocalist and pianist, died in her sleep Tuesday at the Charlestown Retirement Community in Catonsville. She was 97. She played musical accompaniment for silent movies during the 1920s, sang on WBAL-Radio in the 1930s and, at the end of her life, performed with the Charles Tones Band at Charlestown. Mrs. Mergehenn taught piano and voice for 50 years, beginning in 1946 in a studio in her Hunting Ridge home, and later in Catonsville, where she moved in 1955.
NEWS
February 13, 1994
The dismissal last week of superstar soprano Kathleen Battle from the Metropolitan Opera Company for "unprofessional conduct" is sure to ignite lively controversy among fiercely partisan devotees. Ms. Battle, 45, is one of the classical music world's biggest stars, right up there with Luciano Pavarotti and Placido Domingo. Observers are rightly comparing her tiff with Met General Manager Joseph Volpe to the famous rift that developed between diva Maria Callas and Met boss Rudolph Bing more than a quarter-century ago.Ms.
FEATURES
By Judith Green | October 30, 1997
When Georg Friedrich Haendel came to England as court composer to the Elector of Hanover, who had been named King George I, he changed his name to George Frederick Handel and became a British subject.But there was one thing he didn't change. As one of the foremost opera composers in Europe, he continued to write operas in Italian, after the fashion of the time. He reckoned, however, without the stubborn British public distaste for foreign languages.For the better part of a decade (1730-1736)
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 2, 2003
"How silver-sweet sound lovers' tongues by night, like softest music to attending ears," says Romeo in Act II of Shakespeare's ultimate love tragedy. That silver sweetness will reverberate in the lofty space of Unitarian Universalist Church of Annapolis this weekend when coloratura soprano Kathleen Kinhan, tenor Vincent Tulli Chambers and baritone Joseph Specter visit the church for a program of vocal music, "Love Songs Through the Ages." "Music in general touches people on a visceral level," says Tulli Chambers, who has sung with New York's Dicapo, Amato and Regina opera companies.
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