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By Chicago Tribune | September 23, 1990
GRAND CANYON NATIONAL PARK, Ariz. -- It's so relaxin drifting on a raft down stretches of the Colorado River, beneath the towering red walls of the Grand Canyon, that you can easily slip into that twilight zone between consciousness and sleep. Just about the time you're ready to doze off in the blazing sunshine, however, there comes this sound.Faint at first, but growing louder, is an ominous rumble that causes all your survival instincts to flash bright red."If you hear it but can't see it, watch out," river guide Paul Thevenin says calmly, nodding in the direction of the increasingly deafening din.Mr.
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Tim Wheeler | May 15, 2012
The Potomac River, which flows between Maryland and Virginia, was named the nation's "most endangered" waterway today by a Washington-based environmental group. American Rivers put the Potomac atop its annual list of endangered rivers.  Though cleaner than it used to be, the "nation's river," so named because it flows through Washington, D.C., still faces threats from urban and agricultural pollution, the group says, and from cutbacks being pushed in Congress of federal environmental regulations.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 4, 2007
A Western drought that began in 1999 has continued after the respite of a couple of wet years that now feel like a cruel tease. But this time people in the driest states are not just scanning the skies and hoping for meteorological rescue. About $2.5 billion in water projects are planned or under way in four states, the biggest expansion in the West's quest for water in decades. Among them is a proposed 280-mile pipeline that would direct water to Las Vegas from northern Nevada. A proposed reservoir just north of the California-Mexico border would correct an inefficient delivery system that lets excess water pass to Mexico.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 4, 2007
A Western drought that began in 1999 has continued after the respite of a couple of wet years that now feel like a cruel tease. But this time people in the driest states are not just scanning the skies and hoping for meteorological rescue. About $2.5 billion in water projects are planned or under way in four states, the biggest expansion in the West's quest for water in decades. Among them is a proposed 280-mile pipeline that would direct water to Las Vegas from northern Nevada. A proposed reservoir just north of the California-Mexico border would correct an inefficient delivery system that lets excess water pass to Mexico.
FEATURES
By Mike Steere and Mike Steere,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 9, 1997
Desert diving sounds like a laugh line, like "Ski Jamaica."But the joke may be on scuba enthusiasts who come to the Southwest and bypass the underwater adventuring in lakes Powell and Mead. These huge, man-made reservoirs on the Colorado River lie, respectively, upstream and downstream from the Colorado's Grand Canyon.Divers in these waters swoop and hover in flooded gorges, alongside vertical walls and pinnacles that soar hundreds of feet. "It's like flying in the Grand Canyon," one aficionado says.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 17, 2003
EL CENTRO, Calif. - Inch by inch, the life's blood of a large swath of the United States - Colorado River water - seeped across the desert. Or rather, across the desert that is now Mike Cox's cotton field. For Cox, circling the field in his pickup truck to check on the water's progress, soaking his cotton is a routine procedure. Every 10 days during the summer, he uses 7.8 million gallons of water diverted by canals from the Colorado River to irrigate the 70-acre field, just a fraction of the 1,000 acres he farms in California's Imperial Valley.
NEWS
December 27, 1991
WHARTON, Texas -- Some southeastern Texas residents headed for higher ground, and others waited it out at home today, as rain-swollen rivers threatened more destruction in the region declared a disaster area by President Bush.Bush flew over some of the areas hit hardest by flooding this morning, including Travis and Bosque counties, before landing at Chase Naval Air Field in Beeville, 60 miles from this hard-hit town.Floods caused by record-breaking rainfall over the past week have killed at least 15 people across Texas, swamped farmland, drowned scores of livestock and caused millions of dollars in damage.
NEWS
By Judith Graham and Judith Graham,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 14, 2003
SALT LAKE CITY - As the sun begins to set, light pours from the sky like water from a tipped pitcher. The Wasatch Mountains glow mauve and pink against the deepening gray-blue dusk. Antelope Island seems to rise from the mist. But where the fading rays of light should be glinting off darkening waters, there is no water to be seen, only cracked gray mud, with grasses turning brown along beaches where waves should be lapping. The Great Salt Lake has disappeared here, just outside Salt Lake City, along the first mile of the causeway leading from the mainland to Antelope Island, a refuge for coyotes, bison, bobcats and antelope.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 4, 2002
PAGE, Ariz. - For 40 years, Glen Canyon Dam has stood as a brawny symbol of growth in the Southwest, taming the flow of the Colorado River and supplying electricity to booming communities. But the dam is putting an environmental stranglehold on a national icon just downstream: the Grand Canyon. Like a giant concrete stopper, the dam has plugged the seasonal ebb and flow of sediment and water temperature. As a result, four native fish are gone and a fifth - the humpback chub - is disappearing and may not have enough adult fish left to sustain the species.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | June 25, 1994
Dr. MacCallum Rienhoff, a Baltimore native, physician and conservationist who was in the real estate business in Colorado, died May 7 of complications of cancer. He was 61.Dr. Rienhoff moved to Denver in 1967 to complete a residency in pathology at the University of Colorado.For the past 25 years, he was a real estate broker and partner in the Ouray Ranch and Anglers Club, the community where he lived at the headwaters of the Colorado River in the Rocky Mountains.As a conservationist, he was interested in balancing the needs of nature and of those who live in it. He and his partner restored part of the Colorado River running through their 600-acre property.
TRAVEL
By Jane Engle and Jane Engle,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 1, 2006
Grand Canyon National Park will start taking applications today for self-guided rafting permits on the Colorado River, using a new lottery that replaces a 26-year-old wait-list system. The lottery will allocate permits for private trips as opposed to those run by commercial outfitters. Private, or noncommercial, trip permits, which have attracted more than 1,000 applicants a year, are among the most coveted and hardest to obtain in the national parks. Whether the lottery will make the permits easier to get is debatable.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,Sun Staff | April 18, 2004
Now Is the Time to Open Your Heart, by Alice Walker. Random House. 240 pages. $24.95. On the first day of her trip down the Colorado River, Kate Talkingtree -- the protagonist of Alice Walker's 10th novel -- asks: "Who would she be at the end of this journey?" The question sets the stage for a work touted by Random House as one woman's "spiritual adventure, quest for self and collision with love." Instead, with its disjointed narrative, distant characters and internal musings, Now is the Time reads more like psychic self-help.
NEWS
By Judith Graham and Judith Graham,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 14, 2003
SALT LAKE CITY - As the sun begins to set, light pours from the sky like water from a tipped pitcher. The Wasatch Mountains glow mauve and pink against the deepening gray-blue dusk. Antelope Island seems to rise from the mist. But where the fading rays of light should be glinting off darkening waters, there is no water to be seen, only cracked gray mud, with grasses turning brown along beaches where waves should be lapping. The Great Salt Lake has disappeared here, just outside Salt Lake City, along the first mile of the causeway leading from the mainland to Antelope Island, a refuge for coyotes, bison, bobcats and antelope.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 17, 2003
EL CENTRO, Calif. - Inch by inch, the life's blood of a large swath of the United States - Colorado River water - seeped across the desert. Or rather, across the desert that is now Mike Cox's cotton field. For Cox, circling the field in his pickup truck to check on the water's progress, soaking his cotton is a routine procedure. Every 10 days during the summer, he uses 7.8 million gallons of water diverted by canals from the Colorado River to irrigate the 70-acre field, just a fraction of the 1,000 acres he farms in California's Imperial Valley.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | December 10, 2002
A plan to flush part of the Colorado River with a tidal wave of water and sediment to save an endangered fish and restore the beaches of Arizona's Grand Canyon was approved yesterday by the federal government. The flooding is the second half of a two-part experiment scheduled to begin next month, when pulses of water will be released southward from the Glen Canyon Dam near the Arizona-Utah border to disrupt the spawning of non-native rainbow and brown trout. The trout have overwhelmed and eaten the native humpback chub, reducing the population from millions to fewer than 2,000 adults.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 4, 2002
PAGE, Ariz. - For 40 years, Glen Canyon Dam has stood as a brawny symbol of growth in the Southwest, taming the flow of the Colorado River and supplying electricity to booming communities. But the dam is putting an environmental stranglehold on a national icon just downstream: the Grand Canyon. Like a giant concrete stopper, the dam has plugged the seasonal ebb and flow of sediment and water temperature. As a result, four native fish are gone and a fifth - the humpback chub - is disappearing and may not have enough adult fish left to sustain the species.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | December 10, 2002
A plan to flush part of the Colorado River with a tidal wave of water and sediment to save an endangered fish and restore the beaches of Arizona's Grand Canyon was approved yesterday by the federal government. The flooding is the second half of a two-part experiment scheduled to begin next month, when pulses of water will be released southward from the Glen Canyon Dam near the Arizona-Utah border to disrupt the spawning of non-native rainbow and brown trout. The trout have overwhelmed and eaten the native humpback chub, reducing the population from millions to fewer than 2,000 adults.
FEATURES
By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,Contributing Writer Los Angeles Times Syndicate | November 7, 1993
"Look at the big lips!" "A mummy face." "There's a raven." "Butterfly!" "Did you see the globe up there?"We were floating down a 16-mile, calm stretch of the Colorado River from Glen Canyon Dam to Lee's Ferry in a big rubber raft along with a dozen other rafters, staring up 800 feet, dwarfed by the imposing walls of the Grand Canyon. Everywhere they looked, the kids could find shapes in the rock.Prior to the trip, I had worried that 9-year-old Matt, 7-year-old Reggie and my 5-year-old nephew, Michael, would be bored by this all-day trip, which would separate them from Nintendo and TV. Nor were there any rapids to provide thrills.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | January 27, 2002
MARBLE CANYON, Ariz. -- Looking down from Historic Navajo Bridge to the green Colorado River 470 feet below, it's easy to have a boatload of admiration for John Wesley Powell. The one-armed explorer and his crew accomplished the monumental task of navigating and mapping the river in 1869. Take a hike down to the river's edge, stick a hand in the shockingly cold water and it's easy to admire a more recent accomplishment. While others were busy trimming trees and buying gifts in December, Julie Munger, Kelly Kalafatich and Rebecca Rusch floated and bobbed 300 miles through the Grand Canyon, from the base of the Glen Canyon Dam near the town of Page to Pierce Ferry near Lake Mead.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 26, 2000
CADIZ, Calif. - Faced with projected shortages in the years ahead, Southern California is close to concluding an agreement that would introduce market forces into the management of its most basic resource - water. The Metropolitan Water District, the government agency that delivers water to nearly 17 million people in the region surrounding Los Angeles, is within weeks of concluding its first contract to buy large volumes from a private company, Cadiz Inc. Under the terms of the nearly concluded contract, officials on both sides say, Cadiz Inc. (pronounced KAY-deez)
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