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NEWS
By Jeff Danziger | October 13, 1990
WHILE YOU SLEPT, the colors have changed. Not on the trees. In the fall mail-order catalogues.Remember how proud you were when you learned that ecru was basically an off-white? Well, ecru, named after the small French animal from whose leavings the color is distilled, is now on the passe color list. My catalogues from J. Crew, Tweeds and other upscale schmutterfloggers, barely use the term. Garments are no longer listed in white or ecru. White sweaters are now snow, winter or limestone. Off-white is now parchment, lava, quartz, bone, shell or ale.I swear, I am not making any of this up.Slightly darker tones, moving to what the unenlightened might call tan, are now sand, mortar, feather, rattan, palomino, thorn, mushroom and creme.
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FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | October 11, 1998
Color is one of the simplest and yet most profound ways human beings have of shaping their surroundings to suit their style, taste and whim. Color can suggest a sense of history (Williamsburg blue), a sense of place (Provencal yellow), an era (mauve, the Gilded Age; turquoise, the 1950s), a discipline (minimalist white), a sport (black and orange), a gender (pink or blue). It can lift or soothe the spirits, whisper conformity or scream eccentricity. But how many of us really know how to use it?
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,Sun Staff | June 8, 2003
In case you haven't noticed, color is back in a big way this summer. We're not talking dainty florals or big bold Hawaiian prints, and we don't even mean measured cabana stripes. What we're talking about is hot pink, fiery orange and bright blue in big bold splashes that are impossible not to notice. So pack up the black. It's time to toss on a little color, race outside and cavort like a jumping bean. Here are some ideas to get you started: Hot in the shade Maybe there was a time when you wanted your sunglasses basic and black -- it was all about blending in. Now it's all about making a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt | May 20, 1999
Even after the invention of photography, painters still claimed supremacy in rendering color, especially in portraiture. Photographers responded by hand-painting their images to make them more lifelike."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2004
HOLLYWOOD -- Flesh tone alert! Colorization is back. Along with the mullet hairstyle, Vanilla Ice and Andrew Dice Clay, colorization was among the biggest embarrassments of the 1980s and early '90s. Thanks to complaints of filmmakers and movie purists, though, colorization faded from sight like a painful memory. Until now. Columbia TriStar Home Video has unleashed two collections of vintage Three Stooges shorts -- in computerized color. Nyuk, nyuk, yuck! Why the just-add-color revival?
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,Staff Writer | May 27, 1992
It just wasn't fitting that the woman who may be the U.S. Naval Academy's last Color Girl helped transfer the brigade flags on the cement floor of a hockey rink instead of the green grass of sun-splashed Worden Field yesterday.But drenching rains forced the ceremony, a 121-year-old tradition that is on the verge of falling victim to changing sensibilities, inside cavernous Dahlgren Hall and turned it into a pale shadow of its former self.Instead of the entire brigade of midshipmen stretched out across the field, only the color company was formed at one end of the rink.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Sun Staff Writer | April 16, 1994
Buying a car was a lot easier back in the days of the Model T Ford, especially when it came to picking the color. You could get black, or you could get black.But in the era of antilock brakes and turbo-charged fuel injection, life is not nearly so simple.Car manufacturers are being offered more than 150 different colors to pretty up their latest offerings, including pink and purple.There are even new paints that people in the industry call bi-color hues, where the color changes depending on the angle from which the car is viewed.
FEATURES
By L. D. Buckner and L. D. Buckner,Sun Staff Writer | March 10, 1994
Redbone, yellow, taffy, peanut butter, caramel, walnut, chocolate, coffee, black -- too black -- such are the colors of the rainbow in Stevie's universe. For Stevie's peers, it's color, boys and being cool that keep the Earth rotating on its axis.But in a telling scene in this first novel, Jean "Stevie" Stevenson and a group of girlfriends hold their adolescent arms out in a brown spectrum, quibbling over who is lighter or darker than the next. Stevie asks, "Why do we do this?"She's about 12 when she furrows her brow, sucks her teeth and pulls her very toasted arm away from the crowd.
FEATURES
By Elsa Klensch and Elsa Klensch,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | October 10, 1996
I have no confidence at all when it comes to buying clothes, and I might as well be colorblind. I'm so insecure, I always stick to neutrals.I go for grays and beiges as well as those other safe colors, black and brown.My sister constantly nags me about it. Her latest approach has been to buy me what she wants me to wear.For fall, she gave me a red coat, saying, "At the very least dress up those boring colors."I actually like the coat, but I don't know whether this is right for me.Can I wear it with my beige suits and other neutrals?
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | April 24, 1996
In "Lucy Sleeps With Master Muford," the eighth cut on their new compact disc, singer Aleta Greene and guitarist Wall Matthews conjure a smoky ghost from a fire stoked in the seven previous songs. This ghost is a woman-child -- innocent, abused, weepy, weary -- and hers is the voice of midnight. She is Lucy, a slave somewhere in America somewhere in time. She comes to life as Greene sings and Matthews plays, a collaboration for which all people interested in interesting music should be grateful.
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