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by Carson Porter | August 12, 2011
This looks like a fun little party trick. Or maybe it just caught my eye because I went to an awesome black light party a few weeks ago. Either way for $12 it's worth a look.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
We are approaching prime time for viewing fall foliage in the mountains of Western Maryland, according to a report Monday. Much of Garrett County has reached a "high" level of foliage color, according to the Foliage Network, with peak color likely not far behind. The network, a group that pulls foliage reports from spotters around the country, considers high color to be when 61-80 percent of leaves have changed color. Travel + Leisure magazine named the Garrett town of Oakland as the best place in the country to view changing leaves.
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EXPLORE
Kathy Hudson | September 4, 2011
As the days shorten, one bright spot in scraggly gardens is the increased intensity of summer annuals. Zinnias, vincas, begonias and geraniums in our yard are deeper pinks than they've been all this scorching summer.    When flowers are produced in color temperatures, their colors are deeper. Thankfully, temperatures in recent weeks have been much coolor. Our deep pink geraniums and drought-tolerant vincas now look fluorescent. Ditto the magenta-purple zinnias whose seeds were given to me by a friend.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | September 26, 2014
Major League Lacrosse is planning on starting the 2015 season earlier than in the past, with April 11 as the proposed start date, two weeks earlier than the 2014 season began. The final regular-season game in the National Lacrosse League is set for May 2, meaning there will be more overlap between MLL and NLL seasons if MLL starts earlier. The MLL also is experimenting with ways to make the ball more visible on TV, including changing the color or adding a stripe, after trying a smooth, orange ball last season.
NEWS
April 3, 1995
Sometimes an eight-cent bumper sticker can speak volumes.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke has been distributing a bumper sticker for his re-election bid in the tri-colors long associated with African-American pride. "Mayor Schmoke Makes Us Proud," it reads.Politicians have always made unique appeals to their own and to other ethnic groups. The Italians are awash in blarney on St. Patrick's Day and gentile pols stress pro-Israel positions in the Jewish neighborhoods. So what's wrong with Baltimore's first elected black mayor reaching out to voters in this majority black city?
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2013
Miguel De La Cuadra calls his Charles Village garden a work in progress, yet its profusion of color gives the impression of a long-completed work of art. Just three years in the making, the rowhouse garden features raised beds overflowing with lilies, hosta, astilbe and roses. A Japanese maple drapes gracefully over a koi pond. Potted impatiens, petunias and geraniums brighten a privacy fence. De La Cuadra, a human resources generalist, says he aspired to create a garden that blooms with color from spring to fall.
NEWS
By Rosemary J. Zook | June 11, 2002
EAST STROUDSBURG, Pa. - I woke up this morning in a cold sweat because I didn't know what color it was. I used to question the weather upon awakening. But since the color-coded Homeland Security Advisory System was devised, all I want to know is what's the color of the day. It's a whole lot more comfortable with my head in the sand. But I, like my fellow Americans, now realize that terrorists abound and can plan all kinds of heinous activities against our people. And that includes me. Just about the time I was beginning to lull myself into an obviously false sense of security, the color-coded system brought new terror to my heart.
NEWS
By LINDA L.S. SCHULTE | February 4, 1992
Oh, NOW I understand. The key to the bigotry of the GeorgeLincoln Rockwells and Saddam Husseins lies not in their souls but in their coloring books.2 And pass me the David Duke Pure White, please.Linda L.S. Schulte stays within the lines of Laurel.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | October 23, 1997
A major pleasure of Deborah Donelson's work is that it doesn't stagnate. She continues to develop, as her current exhibit at Gomez Gallery proves.In the early 1990s, her paintings were concerned with a search for self. Then, in her 1995 show, some paintings exhibited a new sense of self-worth and confidence, while others explored subjects in the history of art and literature. That show also demonstrated her control and mastery of color.In her seven paintings at Gomez, she appears interested in exploring color for its own sake, in an abstract way. Her pictures are still representational, are still populated with women and can have themes.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts | October 21, 1993
Men of the '90s, bless them, are a lot more conversant with fashion than their fathers dreamed of being. We can attribute that to TV (you've heard men trash Sam Donaldson's ties) and major ad campaigns by designers (most men recognize a Polo logo) who have discovered that men care and spend on their appearance.There are hurdles though, when fashion takes a new twist. Tweeds, which haven't been a factor since the late '50s, are a new test of fashion savvy.Tom Julian, fashion director of the Fashion Association, knows all the subtleties of male attire.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
Otakon is many things, all of them having to do with Japanese and East Asian popular culture. But most of all -- at least to outsiders -- it's all about the costumes. Check out the area around the convention center Friday morning, before the fan convention's 8:30 a.m. opening, and you'll see hundreds of people lined up outside, few of them wearing anything normal. The whole scene resembles an anime artist's sketchbook come to vivid life. Visit the Inner Harbor over the weekend, or hang around outside nearby Oriole Park at Camden Yards, and the selection of magical girls, evil spirits, ninja warriors, faeries and Pokemen on display feels almost otherworldly.
NEWS
By E.R. Shipp | August 3, 2014
If you are black and have done business with the city or the state - or have even thought of it - you probably know the name Arnold Jolivet. If you are a politician who has anything at all to do with granting government contracts, you definitely know that name. People like me, on the other hand, who go about our lives without giving a thought about procurement processes, probably know nothing of the man that a city official, a construction contractor and a staunch critic of city government admiringly described to me as a warrior.
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
Armed with the right tools and tips, achieving the top hair and makeup looks for the summer season can be a breeze. From the casual comfort of a beach-inspired appearance to a more formal updo, Baltimore stylists and artists have come up with ways to recreate these looks on your own. Follow these rules and stand out from the rest. Makeup trend: Smoky eye Expert: Gavin Hebert, makeup artist at All About Me Salon and Day Spa, Towson; allaboutmedayspa.com How to achieve it: The smoky eye is a technique more than a color, according to Hebert.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
It's just one of about 100 costumes that band leader Kenley Shortmus John of Baltimore makes from scratch each year, when his designs will be showcased in the annual Baltimore/Washington One Caribbean Carnival, held this weekend. "My costumes symbolize the beauty of life in the tropics," says John, the founder and leader of Caribbean Tropical Expressions, one of 15 bands that will participate in the parade that is the festival's centerpiece. "My costumes are an expression of ... our cultural heritage.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
Don Scott will sign off for the last time Friday morning at WJZ -TV after 40 years at the station. Tens of thousands of Baltimore viewers have started their day with him for the more than three decades that he's been at the station's morning anchor desk. That's a run not likely to be duplicated by many in the new media world. And WJZ has consistently finished at or near the top of the ratings during that time. I talked with the 64-year-old broadcaster this week about his final days on the air in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
At 90 years old, Betty Williams' clearest memory of her days at Colored School 115 is running through an alley the schoolchildren thought was haunted. "It was a game to run through and not get caught," she said, describing the lane between two of the old school's buildings. Williams attended grades one through six at the school, built in 1888 in Baltimore's Waverly neighborhood, from 1929 to 1935. It was declared unfit for children in the 1920s but continued in use because of "the feeling that black children weren't deserving of anything better," said historian JoAnn Robinson.
NEWS
By Garland L. Thompson | December 6, 1990
IJUST READ a gorgeous book. Fascinating to read, but also gorgeous. ''Romare Bearden: His Life and Art,'' by Myron Scwartzman. The fascinating part has to do with the stories Bearden told Mr. Schwartzman, a Baruch College English professor and jazz pianist, over a six-year period. The gorgeous part is obvious when you stop to look at the pictures -- 250 in all, 120 in glorious, living color.And color is what the work of Romare Bearden is all about.Bearden, great-grandson of slaves, was a son of the South who spent his boyhood watching it re-impose harsh racial mores after the progress at the turn of the century.
FEATURES
By Elsa Klensch and Elsa Klensch,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | January 9, 1997
I wear only black or white, and I stay with suits with slim pants and skirts. When my husband grumbles about my lack of interest in color, I point out that minimalism costs less. But now, with all the color in the stores, I'm tempted to buy a coat that will surprise him while giving a lift to my spring wardrobe.What would be the best choice?The most functional coat is an easy-fitting seven-eighths. This length is the right proportion for pants and long or short skirts. The easy fit allows it to go comfortably over jackets, dresses or tops.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2014
With a riot of color onstage, Washington National Opera's presentation of "The Magic Flute" could not be more visually animated if it tried. There's a good deal to entertain the ears as well. This co-production with four other companies is, above all, a showcase for Japanese-born, Omaha-based artist Jun Kaneko. His set and costume design, a kind of pop art/classic Asian fusion, gives Mozart's opera a fresh flash of fantasy, not to mention whimsy. If there are times when the stylized look seems arbitrary (many of the projections suggest a digital Etch A Sketch)
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2014
Billy Howarth filled a plastic bottle with bright blue cornstarch and patiently waited for the first of the Color Run participants to pass through the blue zone. "They told us we have to go like a hose," said Howarth, a 21-year-old University of Delaware student in town to volunteer as a color thrower for Saturday's 5K run, as he motioned the bottle from side to side. "You can't go up and down. And for little kids we have to do it gently. " The color throwers covered their mouths with bandannas as the first runners came through, pelting them with blue until a cloud of color rose high into the air in the parking lot near Oriole Park at Camden Yards . Blue was the last of five colors the runners would race through before crossing the finish line.
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