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Colony Collapse Disorder

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By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2010
A Maryland research center established to protect soldiers from chemical and biological attack has been enlisted in the fight to save honeybees from the mysterious disorder that has been devastating commercial bee populations. Scientists at the Edgewood Arsenal's Chemical Biological Center, in Harford County, have turned equipment developed several years ago to identify proteins present in potential biological weapons, such as anthrax, to figure out what kind of viruses, bacteria or other pathogens are killing the bees.
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By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2013
Honeybees responsible for pollinating crops worth billions of dollars are under attack from a cocktail of fungicides and pesticides that weaken colonies and make them susceptible to a deadly parasite, according to a study by the University of Maryland and federal agriculture researchers. The report, published in the online scientific journal PLOS ONE this week, said contaminated pollen from seven different test crops on the East Coast reduced the ability of healthy bees to fend off a parasite that causes them to starve to death.
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By McClatchy-Tribune | June 27, 2008
WASHINGTON - A record 36 percent of U.S. commercial bee colonies have been lost to mysterious causes so far this year and worse may be yet to come, experts told a congressional panel yesterday. The year's bee colony losses are about twice what follows a typical winter, scientists warn. Despite ambitious new research efforts, the causes remain a mystery. "We need results," pleaded Steve Godlin, a California beekeeper. "We need a unified effort by all." The escalating campaign against what's generically called colony collapse disorder includes more state, federal and private funding for research.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2011
Behold the honeybee. Tireless worker. Loyal to the homeland. Responsible for much of what we buy in the grocery store. That's a big burden for such tiny wings. Hundreds of visitors came Saturday to the Patuxent Wildlife Refuge in Laurel to pay their respects, stroll around flower-dotted lawns and buy honey and beeswax candles as part of the fourth annual Maryland Honey Harvest Festival. Thebees didn't disappoint, taking center stage for hourly demonstrations to prove how docile and industrious they are when compared to their unruly relative, the wasp, which visitors were informed "live to sting.
NEWS
By Marc Hoffman | June 28, 2007
Between 40 percent and 50 percent of Maryland's bee colonies die off each year, and these losses must be made up every spring and summer by buying replacements and by splitting existing hives. Can you imagine the attention the poultry industry, the horse industry or pet owners would demand if half of their animals were lost annually? Maryland beekeepers need public support, through an adequately funded apiary inspection program, Maryland-specific research and an extension service that applies the research to the practice of beekeeping.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,Sun reporter | April 22, 2008
Each year, Don Kolpack can't wait for spring. Pollen-rich flowers begin to burst open and the hundreds of thousands of African honeybees that the Howard County beekeeper cares for busily collect nectar to help make their honey supply for the season. But when the retired carpenter went to check on the hives he kept in a wooded area in Savage last month, they were gone. "I thought to myself, `Who in the world would do this?'" said Kolpack, 74, who has kept bees as a hobby for 55 years.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2011
Behold the honeybee. Tireless worker. Loyal to the homeland. Responsible for much of what we buy in the grocery store. That's a big burden for such tiny wings. Hundreds of visitors came Saturday to the Patuxent Wildlife Refuge in Laurel to pay their respects, stroll around flower-dotted lawns and buy honey and beeswax candles as part of the fourth annual Maryland Honey Harvest Festival. Thebees didn't disappoint, taking center stage for hourly demonstrations to prove how docile and industrious they are when compared to their unruly relative, the wasp, which visitors were informed "live to sting.
FEATURES
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2013
Honeybees responsible for pollinating crops worth billions of dollars are under attack from a cocktail of fungicides and pesticides that weaken colonies and make them susceptible to a deadly parasite, according to a study by the University of Maryland and federal agriculture researchers. The report, published in the online scientific journal PLOS ONE this week, said contaminated pollen from seven different test crops on the East Coast reduced the ability of healthy bees to fend off a parasite that causes them to starve to death.
FEATURES
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2013
Something is killing the honey bees of Maryland. Close to 60 percent of the managed hives died last fall and over the winter - about twice the national average, according to the state bee inspector and local keepers. "I had a healthy hive that produced 50 pounds of honey last year, and we were anticipating another great year," said Stephen Christianson, a Mount Washington beekeeper of three years. "Then, they were just gone. It took my breath away. " Some blame inexperience on the part of the beekeepers, most of whom tend their hives as a hobby, coupled with a bad winter.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby | May 11, 2008
Those hard-working honeybees so vital to the success of Maryland's $80 million-a-year fruit and vegetable industry are faring better here than in other parts of the country. Commercial beekeepers across the nation reported that they lost 36.1 percent of their honeybees over the winter, according to a recent survey by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. A large portion of those losses -- about a third -- are due to a phenomenon scientists call colony collapse disorder, or CCD, in which the adult bees leave a hive and die. "We normally lose about 25 percent of our honeybee population over the winter," said Kim Kaplan, a representative of the Agricultural Research Service Center in Beltsville.
FEATURES
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2010
A Maryland research center established to protect soldiers from chemical and biological attack has been enlisted in the fight to save honeybees from the mysterious disorder that has been devastating commercial bee populations. Scientists at the Edgewood Arsenal's Chemical Biological Center, in Harford County, have turned equipment developed several years ago to identify proteins present in potential biological weapons, such as anthrax, to figure out what kind of viruses, bacteria or other pathogens are killing the bees.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | June 27, 2008
WASHINGTON - A record 36 percent of U.S. commercial bee colonies have been lost to mysterious causes so far this year and worse may be yet to come, experts told a congressional panel yesterday. The year's bee colony losses are about twice what follows a typical winter, scientists warn. Despite ambitious new research efforts, the causes remain a mystery. "We need results," pleaded Steve Godlin, a California beekeeper. "We need a unified effort by all." The escalating campaign against what's generically called colony collapse disorder includes more state, federal and private funding for research.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,Sun reporter | April 22, 2008
Each year, Don Kolpack can't wait for spring. Pollen-rich flowers begin to burst open and the hundreds of thousands of African honeybees that the Howard County beekeeper cares for busily collect nectar to help make their honey supply for the season. But when the retired carpenter went to check on the hives he kept in a wooded area in Savage last month, they were gone. "I thought to myself, `Who in the world would do this?'" said Kolpack, 74, who has kept bees as a hobby for 55 years.
NEWS
By Marc Hoffman | June 28, 2007
Between 40 percent and 50 percent of Maryland's bee colonies die off each year, and these losses must be made up every spring and summer by buying replacements and by splitting existing hives. Can you imagine the attention the poultry industry, the horse industry or pet owners would demand if half of their animals were lost annually? Maryland beekeepers need public support, through an adequately funded apiary inspection program, Maryland-specific research and an extension service that applies the research to the practice of beekeeping.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 15, 2014
The mysterious die-off of honey bees continues, as beekepers across the nation lost more than one in three of their colonies since last spring, researchers reported Thursday.  The losses in Maryland were even more extreme, where nearly half were lost, according to the state's chief apiary inspector. The national survey of beekeepers found that they lost one in five honey bee colonies over the winter, fewer than the winter before. But they reported seeing substantial die-off in summer as well, pushing their year-round losses to more than a third.
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