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By Andrea K. Walker | June 3, 2013
The New York Times looked at the varying costs of a colonoscopy at hospitals around the country to illustrate how simple medical procedures are driving up health care costs. The story that ran over the weekend found that the costs of medical procedures in the United States are often higher than in other developing countries and varies widely from hospital to hospital. Baltimore has some of the lowest rates for colonoscopies, according to one New York Times chart. The most someone will pay for a colonoscopy in the city is $1,908.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | June 3, 2013
The New York Times looked at the varying costs of a colonoscopy at hospitals around the country to illustrate how simple medical procedures are driving up health care costs. The story that ran over the weekend found that the costs of medical procedures in the United States are often higher than in other developing countries and varies widely from hospital to hospital. Baltimore has some of the lowest rates for colonoscopies, according to one New York Times chart. The most someone will pay for a colonoscopy in the city is $1,908.
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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 27, 2005
Virtual colonoscopy, an increasingly popular technique that uses CT scans instead of invasive endoscopy to identify colon polyps, can identify many medical problems outside the colon, making it a more valuable tool than researchers had previously believed. In 500 men undergoing virtual colonoscopy, 45 had significant problems outside the colon, including aneurysms and other cancers, researchers from the University of California, San Francisco, report today in the journal Radiology. "We found that virtual colonoscopy can detect cancers and other conditions that would be missed with conventional colonoscopy with a negligible radiation risk, roughly comparable to that of a routine CT scan of the abdomen," said the principal author, Dr. Judy Yee, a radiologist at the University of California.
EXPLORE
May 20, 2011
The month of May has been designated as Women's Health Month to encourage women to take charge of their health. There is no better step that a woman over the age of 50 (or 45 for African-Americans) can take than to schedule a colonoscopy. Colon cancer is the third leading cause of cancer deaths for women, but with early detection, it is 90 percent curable. And while mammograms and Pap tests are critical for the early detection of breast and cervical cancer, a colonoscopy can actually prevent colon cancer because colon cancer often starts as a benign polyp.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | December 4, 2003
The recent headlines about virtual colonoscopy have lifted the spirits of many of us in the geezer and near-geezer communities, although no one is exactly popping champagne and throwing confetti just yet. Personally, I had hoped for a bit more from the medical community on this issue. In fact, I had hoped for headlines that blared: "Colonoscopy, schmolonoscopy: researchers call procedure `huge waste of time' " and "Public urged to adopt `que sera, sera' attitude toward colon-cancer screening."
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | June 5, 2003
I THOUGHT today we could discuss something that has undoubtedly been on the minds of many of you, and that, of course, is my recent colonoscopy. Writing about your colonoscopy is the pathetic legacy of the baby boomer generation. The generations before us wrote about surviving wild animal attacks, exploring uncharted territories, fighting in great wars, enduring killer epidemics. But baby boomers have so few hardships in their lives that they elevate routine medical procedures to the status of heroic, life-or-death struggles to be glorified in print.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,sun reporter | June 20, 2007
Johns Hopkins researchers are developing a simple blood test that can help doctors determine who needs a colonoscopy, a screening procedure for colon cancer recommended for all adults over 50 - but one considered so unpleasant that many avoid it. The new test, which looks for cancer-related proteins in the blood, identifies colon cancer and precancerous polyps almost as well as a colonoscopy, according to a study published in the journal Cancer Research....
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 2, 2003
An X-ray technique called virtual colonoscopy appears to be as effective as the conventional procedure for detecting polyps in the colon but is less invasive, does not require sedation and eliminates the risk of inadvertently puncturing the intestine, researchers said yesterday. The new procedure does not eliminate the onerous 24-hour cleansing procedure in which wastes are washed out of the intestines - a process that many patients find the most objectionable part of the procedure. And a regular colonoscopy is required if polyps are detected.
NEWS
By Peter Wallsten and Peter Wallsten,Los Angeles Times | July 22, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Five small polyps removed yesterday from President Bush's colon will be examined for signs of cancer, but the White House said that none "appeared worrisome" and are considered likely to be benign. The results of testing, to be conducted at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, will be announced by Tuesday and will "determine the final diagnosis and recommendations for future examinations," according to a White House statement. Each polyp was less than 1 centimeter in diameter, meaning they were probably caught before cancer could develop.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | May 19, 2005
Five years after a large study found that colonoscopy is the best way to detect early colon cancers in men, another has found that the same is true for women - only more so. The reason: the less-invasive test that many patients prefer is likely to miss 65 percent of the precancerous growths that colonoscopy detects in women. In men, only a third would be missed. "This means that it's even that much more important for women to use colonoscopy as their preferred tool for colorectal cancer screening," said Dr. Philip Schoenfeld, an assistant professor of medicine at the University of Michigan and lead author of the study in today's New England Journal of Medicine.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | September 19, 2008
The fun of Ghost Town starts with the title and doesn't end until the final line. In fact, the ending, in its own milder way, is as perfect as "nobody's perfect" in Some Like It Hot. In this movie, New York City is the ghost town, and not because everyone has left it, as in I Am Legend. Without even knowing it, surviving friends and loved ones, because of their unresolved emotions, keep a horde of dead Manhattanites tethered to Earth. As the dentist who discovers he can converse with the dead, Ricky Gervais gives the film a rich, bittersweet center.
NEWS
By JANET GILBERT | September 14, 2008
Why is it that I can't seem to shake problematic service providers - from my head down to my ... colon? Let's start at the top. Several years ago, I had my hair highlighted at a salon. The stylist said that because my hair was short, she could achieve a nice result by "pulling it through the frosting cap." Unbeknownst to her, another stylist already had used the cap. The bleach bled through the larger holes into an almost geometric, chunky pattern all over my head. In short, I entered the salon as Nancy Pelosi, and I left as Courtney Love.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,Sun reporter | March 20, 2008
New findings by California researchers may change the way doctors think about colonoscopy -- a popular screening test for colon and rectal cancer. The research suggests that flat lesions growing on the colon wall are more common than previously thought -- and are five times more likely to be cancerous than the more well-known, protruding growths called polyps. Many doctors are not as familiar with the flat lesions, which are much more difficult to spot during colonoscopy, and may not know how dangerous they can be. "It has been thought in the past that big polyps were the big players that turned into cancer," said Dr. Peter Darwin, director of gastrointestinal endoscopy at the University of Maryland Medical Center.
NEWS
By Peter Wallsten and Peter Wallsten,Los Angeles Times | July 22, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Five small polyps removed yesterday from President Bush's colon will be examined for signs of cancer, but the White House said that none "appeared worrisome" and are considered likely to be benign. The results of testing, to be conducted at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, will be announced by Tuesday and will "determine the final diagnosis and recommendations for future examinations," according to a White House statement. Each polyp was less than 1 centimeter in diameter, meaning they were probably caught before cancer could develop.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,sun reporter | June 20, 2007
Johns Hopkins researchers are developing a simple blood test that can help doctors determine who needs a colonoscopy, a screening procedure for colon cancer recommended for all adults over 50 - but one considered so unpleasant that many avoid it. The new test, which looks for cancer-related proteins in the blood, identifies colon cancer and precancerous polyps almost as well as a colonoscopy, according to a study published in the journal Cancer Research....
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | February 17, 2006
Are pets good for people's health? Probably, though the data are mixed. In the 1980s, some studies suggested that pet ownership was linked to better health in a number of ways. But a review of more recent studies, published late last year in the British Medical Journal, disputed that. Researchers could not confirm, for instance, that pet ownership was linked to a lower risk of heart disease, that pet owners made fewer doctor visits or that owning a pet boosted the mental and physical health of older adults.
NEWS
February 3, 2002
IF YOU'RE over 50, Johns Hopkins may be your new best friend. Scientists at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center reported this week that they have developed a test for colorectal cancer that would significantly reduce the number of people who have to undergo colonoscopies. The test is expected to be available for widespread use in three to five years. According to a study published in The New England Journal of Medicine on Thursday, the test requires a patient to submit a stool sample for genetic testing, and only those who test positive using the new procedure would have to undergo a colonoscopy.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 29, 2002
WASHINGTON - President Bush said yesterday that he would transfer the powers of the presidency to Vice President Dick Cheney for a short time today while he is under sedation for what he described as a routine colonoscopy. The White House counsel, Alberto R. Gonzales, said Cheney would be acting president "for a matter of hours" under a clause in the 25th Amendment. That clause has been invoked at only one other time in American history, in July 1985, when President Ronald Reagan underwent surgery for colon cancer and transferred powers for about nine hours to Bush's father, then the vice president.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 27, 2005
Virtual colonoscopy, an increasingly popular technique that uses CT scans instead of invasive endoscopy to identify colon polyps, can identify many medical problems outside the colon, making it a more valuable tool than researchers had previously believed. In 500 men undergoing virtual colonoscopy, 45 had significant problems outside the colon, including aneurysms and other cancers, researchers from the University of California, San Francisco, report today in the journal Radiology. "We found that virtual colonoscopy can detect cancers and other conditions that would be missed with conventional colonoscopy with a negligible radiation risk, roughly comparable to that of a routine CT scan of the abdomen," said the principal author, Dr. Judy Yee, a radiologist at the University of California.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | May 19, 2005
Five years after a large study found that colonoscopy is the best way to detect early colon cancers in men, another has found that the same is true for women - only more so. The reason: the less-invasive test that many patients prefer is likely to miss 65 percent of the precancerous growths that colonoscopy detects in women. In men, only a third would be missed. "This means that it's even that much more important for women to use colonoscopy as their preferred tool for colorectal cancer screening," said Dr. Philip Schoenfeld, an assistant professor of medicine at the University of Michigan and lead author of the study in today's New England Journal of Medicine.
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