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September 27, 1992
Maryland history will come to life next weekend during the 25th anniversary of the Historic Pageant and Blessing of the Fleet at St. Clement's Island. The island was the original landing site of the Maryland colonists in 1634.The 7th District Optimist Club, sponsor of the event, has planned a big celebration Saturday and next Sunday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Visitors can take a free boat ride to the island from St. Clement's Island-Potomac River Museum at Colton's Point. On the island there will be activities for all ages, including arts and crafts, an amateur decoy carving contest, musical entertainment, Maryland seafood, puppet shows and many other activities for children.
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TRAVEL
By Shruti Rastogi | March 26, 2010
There's a lot more to the Maryland Day celebration at Historic St. Mary's City on Sunday than just honoring the 376th anniversary of Maryland's founding. St. Mary's City is a living history museum and has four sites that immerse visitors in 17th-century life. Maryland Day is March 25, commemorating the day the first colonists, who sailed in on the Ark and Dove, landed on St. Clements Island in 1634. However, the museum celebrates it on the Sunday closest to that date, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., with all exhibits and events free to the public.
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NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | June 25, 1993
WASHINGTON -- When archaeologists excavated 18 graves at a 3-century-old Calvert County plantation a few years ago, they had no headstones, no diaries, no letters and no church records. Nothing to tell the stories of those long-vanished colonists.Now Douglas H. Ubelaker, an anthropologist at the Smithsonian Institution, has made the bones talk.By studying wear and tear and the shapes and sizes of the bones, Dr. Ubelaker has produced grim snapshots of life on a mid-17th century Maryland settlement: of shoulders strained by heavy lifting and hauling, of clay pipes puffed habitually through clenched teeth, of bones made brittle by disease, of malnutrition and early death.
FEATURES
March 5, 2007
March 5 1770 The Boston Massacre took place as British soldiers, taunted by colonists, opened fire, killing five people. 1997 North and South Korea met for the first time in 25 years to talk peace.
FEATURES
March 5, 2007
March 5 1770 The Boston Massacre took place as British soldiers, taunted by colonists, opened fire, killing five people. 1997 North and South Korea met for the first time in 25 years to talk peace.
TRAVEL
By Shruti Rastogi | March 26, 2010
There's a lot more to the Maryland Day celebration at Historic St. Mary's City on Sunday than just honoring the 376th anniversary of Maryland's founding. St. Mary's City is a living history museum and has four sites that immerse visitors in 17th-century life. Maryland Day is March 25, commemorating the day the first colonists, who sailed in on the Ark and Dove, landed on St. Clements Island in 1634. However, the museum celebrates it on the Sunday closest to that date, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., with all exhibits and events free to the public.
NEWS
November 26, 1998
In good years and bad, Americans have been observing public days of thanksgiving since 1621, the year after the Pilgrims' arrival in the New World. Here are abridged texts of some Thanksgiving proclamations past and present.In 1675, a coalition of Indian tribes attacked colonists in central Massachusetts and laid waste to several settlements. They were led by Metacomet, a Wampanoag chieftain called by the colonists King Philip. Ironically, he was a son of Massasoit, who had befriended the Plymouth colonists half a century earlier and saved them from starvation.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | November 28, 1991
Paris -- One might have expected this year's to be a happy Thanksgiving, rather than the troubled one it proves to be. A year ago the United States was marching toward a war about whose costs no one could be sure.Today that is past, and the Cold War is over; and if the world remains a violent place, the United States now is mainly engaged as a peacemaker.The anxiety comes from within. Superficially it concerns the economy. Beyond that, however, is concern that other things in the country have been getting worse, including education, racial and minority relations, even relations between the sexes.
FEATURES
By Randi Kest and Randi Kest,Contributing Writer | November 8, 1998
Among decorating cognoscenti, the notion of paring down has gained popularity in recent years. The glossy home magazines have embraced this minimalism with a bear hug, even at the holidays. When was the last time you saw Martha Stewart trimming her trees with tinsel or spraying them with gaudy flocking?Peeling away the layers of froufrou may seem like a new idea, but the Colonists who settled Williamsburg practiced it nearly 300 years ago. Their idea of decking the halls for the holidays was a display of simple greens in the windows and sumptuous fruit arrangements on the tables (to be eaten, of course, since Colonists couldn't afford to use edible items only for show)
NEWS
By Eric K. Shinseki | June 15, 2000
WASHINGTON -- In two weeks, Mel Gibson's latest movie, "The Patriot," opens nationwide. Set during the American Revolution, it is the story of a colonist who becomes a militia leader when the sweep of war and the advance of the British endanger his farm and family. Whether by design or mere coincidence, the release of "The Patriot" comes at a particularly fitting time in our nation's history because this month marks the 225th anniversary of the birth of our Army. The birth of our nation and the birth of our Army are inseparably linked.
TRAVEL
October 1, 2006
FODOR'S ISRAEL Fodor's / $21.95 If you've tried to buy a guidebook to Israel, chances are the most up-to-date book you found was from 2003. Fodor's has recently published a revised guide to Israel -- its first since 2001. And this fall it will release an updated Exploring Israel guide. Tourism to Israel sank after the Sept. 11 attacks, but it has been steadily increasing for the past several years. While Israel has long been a destination for Jewish Americans, in recent years tours for Christian travelers have become popular, too. Itineraries in the Fodor's guide include a six-day "Footsteps of Jesus" tour -- including the Mount of Olives, the Garden of Gethsemane, the Stations of the Cross, Mount Zion and the Sea of Galilee.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 27, 2004
PORTSMOUTH, England - Colin Nhennah is 74 and has lived here in the south of England his entire life, in the county called Hampshire. He is pretty sure he knew that people from his area colonized what is now part of the Northeast of the United States. As far as he's concerned, though, nobody from his side of the Atlantic can be blamed for the peculiar U.S. presidential election system, which today focuses on New Hampshire, his home's namesake. "As far as I'm concerned," Nhennah said, puffing on his pipe and sitting on his bar stool at the Ship Anson pub on Portsmouth's waterfront, "we have a cuckoo government over here and you have a cuckoo government over there, and any election that put those governments in power is cuckoo itself."
FEATURES
By Marlene Parrish and Marlene Parrish,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | April 25, 2001
Real Low-Country cooking is hard for a tourist to experience. If you don't get invited into a private home, you might never taste this unique cuisine of South Carolina, except for perfunctory renditions of shrimp, rice and grits on restaurant menus. Why? It is a casualty of modern society and its homogenized tastes. Blame television and the food chains, and blame the bridges for allowing trucks to cart nonlocal foodstuffs into an area that for many years was set apart. But Low-Country cooking is as much a state of mind as a regional cuisine.
NEWS
By Eric K. Shinseki | June 15, 2000
WASHINGTON -- In two weeks, Mel Gibson's latest movie, "The Patriot," opens nationwide. Set during the American Revolution, it is the story of a colonist who becomes a militia leader when the sweep of war and the advance of the British endanger his farm and family. Whether by design or mere coincidence, the release of "The Patriot" comes at a particularly fitting time in our nation's history because this month marks the 225th anniversary of the birth of our Army. The birth of our nation and the birth of our Army are inseparably linked.
NEWS
November 26, 1998
In good years and bad, Americans have been observing public days of thanksgiving since 1621, the year after the Pilgrims' arrival in the New World. Here are abridged texts of some Thanksgiving proclamations past and present.In 1675, a coalition of Indian tribes attacked colonists in central Massachusetts and laid waste to several settlements. They were led by Metacomet, a Wampanoag chieftain called by the colonists King Philip. Ironically, he was a son of Massasoit, who had befriended the Plymouth colonists half a century earlier and saved them from starvation.
FEATURES
By Randi Kest and Randi Kest,Contributing Writer | November 8, 1998
Among decorating cognoscenti, the notion of paring down has gained popularity in recent years. The glossy home magazines have embraced this minimalism with a bear hug, even at the holidays. When was the last time you saw Martha Stewart trimming her trees with tinsel or spraying them with gaudy flocking?Peeling away the layers of froufrou may seem like a new idea, but the Colonists who settled Williamsburg practiced it nearly 300 years ago. Their idea of decking the halls for the holidays was a display of simple greens in the windows and sumptuous fruit arrangements on the tables (to be eaten, of course, since Colonists couldn't afford to use edible items only for show)
NEWS
By Kenneth Lasson | March 25, 1993
THREE hundred fifty-nine years ago today, when the two tin sailing ships Ark and Dove dropped anchor in Maryland, many of the first colonists clambered ashore hopeful they'd found a haven from religious persecution abroad.Little could they have suspected how difficult the struggle for tolerance would be on the shores of the Chesapeake -- nor how much it would prove that liberty is relative, that it requires eternal vigilance.Since then no other colony or state has had a more raucous religious history than Maryland, or engendered as much sweeping legislation and landmark case law to further the cause of religious liberty.
NEWS
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,special to the sun | October 15, 1995
Espionage: It happened in the Pacific too, in World War IIDouglas MacArthur wouldn't have the OSS in his Pacific Theater in World War II; he set up his own, unglamorized intelligence services. Some of their agents penetrated deep inside Japanese-held terrain.In 1943, a unit of three Americans and nine natives was put ashore in the Philippines. Among them was Robert E. Stahl, a 23-year-old enlisted man trained in radio and cryptography. From Mindanao, then Samar, then Luzon, Stahl's group flashed coded word as to enemy aircraft, ships and troops.
NEWS
By Jessica Lazar and Jessica Lazar,SPECIAL TO THE SUN Contributors to this section; Sun research librarians Paul McCardell, Jean Packard and Andrea Wilson, and news intern Brenda Santamaria, contributed to these articles | April 26, 1998
KIBBUTZ EIN HAROD, Israel - In the rosy light of a March dawn, the fields of the Jezreel Valley slope to the west, quilting the foothills of the Gilboa with an undulating spread of olive trees, sweet-smelling citrus and scarlet anemone.From the veranda outside the dining hall on Kibbutz Ein Harod, the air above the fields already swirls with tractor exhaust and tufts of raw cotton spewed from the combines.H. L. Mencken saw the same bucolic landscape when he visited this experiment in communal living in 1934 and came away most impressed by the early Zionists.
BUSINESS
By Joanne E. Morvay and Joanne E. Morvay,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 11, 1996
History says Libertytown took a turn for the worse the day folks voted not to let the railroad wind its way through the area.Talk to people who live in the Frederick County village today, however, and they tell a different story.Jan Dijkstra and Kristina Zaal found their dream home on Main Street in Libertytown. Veronica and Dean Perkins discovered a business opportunity. And Vince and Tami VanSant looked only as far as their own front yards to find a place to raise their children with the same strong morals that punctuated their own youth.
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