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November 30, 2011
Catonsville native William Roberts III was recently promoted to the rank of colonel in a ceremony at Fort George Meade Army Base. He has served for more than 27 years in both active and reserve capacities. In 1975, Roberts graduated from Catonsville High School, where he was the first black male to win the school's Scholar Athlete Award. After earning a degree in sociology at Towson State University, he worked for the Anne Arundel County Department of Corrections for more than 25 years.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
Dr. Paul A. Mullan, a retired Baltimore pediatrician who had also served in the Air Force Medical Corps, died Sunday at Stella Maris Hospice of complications from a stroke. He was 84. The son of George Vaughn Mullan, who was supervisor of maintenance for the New York subway system, and Mary Calaghy Mullan, an administrative assistant, Paul Aloysius Mullan, was born in New York City and raised in Brooklyn. He was a graduate of St. Francis deSales School in Geneva, N.Y., and graduated in 1948 from Seton Hall Preparatory School in South Orange, N.J. After earning a bachelor's degree in 1952 in chemistry, he enrolled at the University of Maryland School of Dentistry, and after a year entered the University of Maryland School of Medicine, where he earned a medical degree in 1957.
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NEWS
November 11, 2005
On November 8, 2005 BISHOP, COLONEL PERCY ELDER loving husband of Theresa Elder. He is also survived by two daughters Shirley and Mercedes Elder; two sons Colonel II and Jesse Elder; sisters Josephine Parrish-Wren, Love Cornelius Watkins, C. Ophelia Cooper, Cherry Elder Smith (Randolph) and brother Clarence L. Elder (Barbara); two grandchildren, three great-grandchildren and a host of other relatives and friends. Friends may call at the family owned MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST, INC., 4300 Wabash Avenue on Friday after 9. Family will receive friends on Saturday at St. John Baptist Church, 2929 Dupont Street at 10 followed by funeral services at 10:30.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
Your Midweek Madness provider is on vacation for a couple of weeks, but understands your need for periodic relief from the dreariness of life, hence this Beethoven-ized blast of a well-known march tune played by the ever so clever Dudley Moore.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | December 7, 1993
The garrison commander of Fort Meade, under investigation for allegedly using profanity and telling lurid stories in speeches at the post, is getting support from employees who deny his remarks were offensive or constituted sexual harassment.Rather, they said, Col. Robert G. Morris III gave an "uplifting" talk using strong language that convinced them the Army post, itself the subject of seven criminal investigations, will be cleaned up."He was giving his philosophy on what would really upset him," said Joan Daughety, chief of non-appropriated funds in the civilian personnel office.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,Staff Writer | January 14, 1994
Fort Meade commander Col. Robert G. Morris III urged soldiers and their families attending yesterday's services honoring the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday to welcome changes in society as a chance to make a difference."
NEWS
By Seattle Post-Intelligencer | July 9, 1994
SEATTLE -- Margarethe Cammermeyer, the decorated Army nurse who was discharged from the Washington National Guard after disclosing that she is a lesbian, was reinstated yesterday by the U.S. Army acting under a court order.But her legal battle with the military is not over. The colonel with 26 years in uniform would be discharged again if the Army prevails in court, according to an Army memorandum.Colonel Cammermeyer won the first round June 1, when U.S. District Judge Thomas Zilly of Seattle rejected the government's contention that the presence of a homosexual would harm military effectiveness.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | December 3, 1993
The 1st U.S. Army inspector general's office is investigating allegations that Col. Robert G. Morris III, the garrison commander of Fort Meade, used profanity and told lurid stories about Army nurses during briefings in front of hundreds of civilian workers.An anonymous letter sent to the Defense Department last month prompted the investigation, said Lt. Col. Baxter Ennis, a 1st Army spokesman, who confirmed the probe yesterday.The letter, from "a concerned soldier," also was sent to The Sun. It details the incidents, which allegedly occurred during meetings at the Post Theater in August and at the Officers Club in September.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | May 2, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The colonel who steered the Marine Corps' war-fighting strategy away from frontal assaults and toward the speed and maneuvering that marked Operation Desert Storm has been forced into early retirement.Col. Mike Wiley, 51, was passed over for promotion to general on March 19. In the military, this means mandatory retirement. His dismissal takes effect in October.Some officers say they fear that the dismissal of Colonel Wiley may mean a reversion to old-fashioned thinking and could send a message to other young officers that innovative ideas do not promote careers.
NEWS
September 16, 2003
Clarence Louis Jasper, a retired Baltimore County police colonel, died of cancer Saturday at the Lorien Bel Air nursing home. The Overlea resident was 81. Colonel Jasper was born and raised in Overlea and graduated in 1940 from Kenwood High School. During World War II, he served in the Marine Corps and earned a Purple Heart when he was wounded while serving in the Marshall Islands. He joined the county police force in 1946, and in his early years was assigned to the Essex and Fullerton stations.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
Franklin Waters "Buck" Trapnell Jr., a retired Army colonel who served in Vietnam, died of a heart attack May 31 while visiting family near Richmond, Va. The former Roland Park resident was 77. Born in Baltimore and raised on Lake Avenue in Cedarcroft, he was the son of Franklin Waters Trapnell, an attorney who became an Office of Strategic Services and Central Intelligence Agency officer. His mother was Emily Willson Rieman Smith, a homemaker and volunteer. According to an autobiographical sketch, he spent much of his youth in Berlin, Germany, and Vienna, Austria, after World War II during the military occupation.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
Odis Lee Sistrunk Jr., a retired Baltimore police lieutenant colonel known as the "Big O," died of undetermined causes May 19 at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The Northeast Baltimore resident was 65. Born in Steubenville, Ohio, he was the son of Odis Lee Sistrunk Sr., a steelworker, and Winnie Mae Sistrunk, a homemaker. He was a 1968 graduate of Steubenville High School, where he played on the basketball team. He joined the Job Corps in New York and responded to an ad that said Baltimore was recruiting police cadets.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2014
George F. Carter, a retired Army colonel who witnessed the Pearl Harbor attack as a young lieutenant, died of complications from a stroke Feb. 24 at the Oak Crest retirement center. The Timonium resident was 96. Born in Oakland, Calif., he was the son of Thomas Carter and Louise Carrau Carter. He earned a bachelor's degree at St. Mary's College of California in Moraga, where he enlisted in Reserve Officers Training Corps. He began his military service as a lieutenant and was assigned to the 25th Infantry Division in Hawaii.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2013
Col. Erland A. Tillman, a decorated Army officer and noted civil engineer who helped design the Maryland Transit Administration's Metro subway from Owings Mills into downtown Baltimore, died of complications from heart failure Sept. 6 at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The longtime resident of Brightwood Retirement Community was 101. "He had two 28-year careers, both successful," said Russell Tillman, a nephew who lives in Mississippi. "He was an interesting man. " Colonel Tillman was born in Iowa, then raised in Minnesota, Massachusetts and Rhode Island, where his father was a Lutheran minister.
NEWS
By Jeff Hutchinson | September 5, 2013
My oldest son turned 16 last month, and I took a day off from work to spend it with him. It was also my plan to get his learner's permit. I thought a trip to the Motor Vehicle Administration would make a great birthday present, and it would afford us some father-son bonding time. Yep, he was finally 16 and ready for another rite of passage and the freedom that comes with driving. As my wife loves to say, "How hard could it be?" I, of course, had no illusion that this would be easy.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2013
Gregory A. "Willie" Eads Sr., a retired Baltimore police officer who attained the rank of colonel during a career that spanned more than three decades, died June 30 from pancreatic cancer at his Catonsville home. He was 61. The son of an Arundel Corp. worker and a funeral home hairdresser, Gregory Augustus Eads Sr., was born in Baltimore and raised in the 800 block of Ostend St., in South Baltimore. After graduating in 1970 from Merganthaler Vocational-Technical High School, he worked at the Cross Street Market and at Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s Sparrows Point plant, before joining the Police Department in 1972.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | February 18, 1993
Col. Kent D. Menser, the garrison commander of Fort George G. Meade who has been changing the base from a training ground for soldiers to a "federal office park," confirmed last night that he has been asked to retire.The 49-year-old garrison commander may be falling victim to the same military downsizing that triggered changes at Fort Meade. He has been transforming a base once used to prepare soldiers for war into one that functions primarily as an administrative post.Fort Meade officials have declined to comment for the past several weeks on Colonel Menser's future, stressing that a decision is not yet final.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 26, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Fair-skinned and hard as nails, Col. Julio Roberto Alpirez is "a soldier above all," in the words of Gen. Hector Gramajo, a former Guatemalan defense minister.For at least five years, Colonel Alpirez was also a well-paid secret operative for the CIA and a murderer, a U.S. congressman says.The colonel's life can be sketched through U.S. Army records, interviews with Guatemalan officials, affidavits and descriptions of secret records on his relationship with the CIA.Colonel Alpirez has been linked to the murder of Michael DeVine, an American innkeeper who lived and worked in the Guatemalan jungle, and the torture and killing of Efrain Bamaca Velasquez, a leftist guerrilla who was the husband of an American lawyer.
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
The Poly boys basketball team needed some time to get comfortable in the Class 4A state semifinal at the University of Maryland's Comcast Center on Thursday night. Going against defending state champion Magruder, it was time the No. 10 Engineers simply couldn't afford. Falling behind early, the Engineers did all they could to climb back, but the Colonels had more than enough answers to come away with a 62-50 win. The Engineers' offensive struggles led to the loss as they only shot 24 percent from the field and made only two of 16 from behind the 3-point line.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2012
Herman G. "Hank" Tillman Jr., a retired Air Force colonel and pilot who flew in World War II, Korea and Vietnam and was one of Maryland's most decorated veterans, died Sunday of liver failure at his Chester home. He was 89. He was born in his immigrant grandparents' Anne Arundel County farmhouse, and later moved with his family to a home at Pontiac Avenue and Sixth Street in Brooklyn. After graduating from Polytechnic Institute in 1940, he attended the Johns Hopkins University at night and worked at Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.'s engineering department during the day. "As a kid, he was fascinated with flying.
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