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By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | April 4, 2000
The Orioles didn't lose their 2000 opener in the first two innings, but they wasted several chances to break it open then. Five of the nine runners the Orioles left on base in their 4-1 loss to the Indians yesterday were stranded in the first two innings. Cleveland starter Bartolo Colon left his control back in 1999, but the Orioles were unable to deliver the blow that would have given Mike Mussina a bigger lead to work with and enlivened manager Mike Hargrove's debut. "We had some chances early, but Colon made enough good pitches to get out of the jams he was in," B. J. Surhoff said.
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SPORTS
By Aaron Oster | March 16, 2014
On Friday night, the WWE announced Carlos Colon as the latest inductee into the 2014 Hall of Fame. While he's not the biggest name, especially to casual wrestling fans, Colon certainly deserves the induction based on his contributions to wrestling. However, he also brings some controversy. To put it simply, Carlos Colon represents professional wrestling in Puerto Rico. He helped to start the World Wrestling Council, the biggest promotion in Puerto Rico, and was its booker and a wrestler for several decades.
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SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,SUN STAFF | August 23, 1998
Ninth-place hitters like Mike Bordick are supposed to be a little intimidated by young flame-throwing pitchers like Cleveland's Bartolo Colon.Colon came to Camden Yards yesterday throwing the ball 101 mph on the speed gun and sporting a 13-6 record with a 3.07 ERA and 137 strikeouts in 176 innings.But Bordick walked up to the plate three times against Colon and once against reliever Paul Shuey and never seemed to flinch.He jumped on the first pitch twice from Colon for two base hits, slamming a run-scoring double to left-center in the fourth inning and a single to left in the sixth, which loaded the bases.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2012
Sourcefire Inc., a Columbia-based provider of cybersecurity technology to government and commercial clients, said its CEO retired earlier this week after taking a medical leave to be treated for colon cancer. John C. Burris, 57, led Sourcefire since 2008. Company officials credited Burris, a former top executive with Citrix Systems, Lucent Technologies and AT&T, with helping it achieve profitability and expand its product offerings. Burris had been on medical leave since July. Martin Roesch, Sourcefire's founder and chief technology officer, is serving as the company's interim CEO until a successor for Burris can be found.
NEWS
By Joe Strauss and Jonathan Bor and Joe Strauss and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | June 18, 1997
Doctors expressed cautious optimism yesterday after confirming they had removed a fist-sized, cancerous mass from the colon of Orioles right fielder Eric Davis.The diagnosis verified what doctors had suspected as early as two weeks ago, but surgeons were encouraged by what they found. During an afternoon news conference, a team of three doctors said they believe the entire cancer was removed before it had invaded other organs."I see no reason why he could not play baseball again," Orioles team physician Dr. William Goldiner said.
NEWS
By New York Times | March 5, 1992
New research suggests that a screening technique in which doctors use instruments to view the colon and rectum may greatly reduce the risk of death from cancers that arise there.But researchers found that the tests need be performed only every 10 years, rebutting arguments by some health organizations that patients should be tested every three to five years.Although some experts raised cautions about the design of the study, reported in to day's New England Journal of Medicine, they also said it was one of the most comprehensive efforts to settle a long-standing controversy over the usefulness of the test, called sigmoidoscopy.
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss and Jonathan Bor and Joe Strauss and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | June 14, 1997
A Johns Hopkins Hospital medical team removed one-third of Orioles right fielder Eric Davis' colon yesterday and will conduct tests this weekend to determine whether a mass that had caused him excruciating pain is cancerous, Orioles sources confirmed.Dr. Keith Lillemoe, the general surgeon who operated on Davis, declined to elaborate on the illness that forced the 2 1/2 -hour operation -- saying only that Davis was plagued by a mass on his colon.But the scope of the surgery was greater than what had been originally anticipated.
SPORTS
June 25, 2005
2985 Last night: Went 1-for-4 with a double vs. Braves Today: 1:20 p.m., vs. Braves (Colon 0-3)
SPORTS
December 24, 2006
Ravens linebacker Terrell Suggs vs. Steelers right tackle Willie Colon George Kokinis, the Ravens' pro personnel director, sizes up today's critical matchup against the Steelers: The players In his fourth season, Suggs already has become one of the best pass rushers in Ravens history. His total of 38 1/2 career sacks ranks third all time behind Peter Boulware (70) and Michael McCrary (51). Suggs is fourth on the Ravens this season with eight sacks and leads the team with three forced fumbles.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2001
When Richard Colon took over the operations of Mace Electric Co. in 1983, the Baltimore County company had a heap of debt and was on the verge of closing. Colon knew it was a risky venture, but he had a plan to turn the company around. As a manager at the now-defunct H. P. Foley Electric Co., Colon had found subcontractors to help his employer comply with laws that called for greater participation of minority- and women-owned businesses in publicly financed projects. The son of a Colombian mother and a Puerto Rican father, Colon saw a gold mine in government contracts.
NEWS
August 2, 2012
Carol Carr's diagnosis of colorectal cancer at age 44 ("Colon cancer rises for young," July 30) underscores the point that even though current national guidelines for average risk individuals call for colon screening to start at age 50, there are important exceptions. Anyone experiencing symptoms like Ms. Carr's should talk to a gastroenterologist. African-Americans fall into a high-risk category and are another exception to the rule to start screening at age 50. The American College of Gastroenterology in its official screening guidelines recommends that African-Americans should start younger - at age 45 - because they face a higher incidence of colorectal cancer generally, have more cancers in the right side of the colon, as well as potentially more aggressive tumors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2012
The Black Keys have predictably sold out their show at the Verizon Center this Friday. But there's no need to pay a scalper or StubHub your life's savings for tickets. It's likely the band will return to the area this summer to play Merriweather Post Pavilion, says a reliable source with knowledge of the band's tour schedule. An announcement with the date is said to be forthcoming. Meanwhile, we've reached out to the band's reps for confirmation and we'll update when we hear back.  It would be the band's second recent appearance at Merriweather - they were one of the headliners at last year's Virgin Mobile FreeFest, where they gave one of the best performances of the night . They are on the road promoting new album "El Camino.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 4, 2008
People with a family history of colon cancer carry the emotional burden of knowing that they have twice the risk of developing the disease themselves. But a new study might ease some of their anxiety. Patients with a family history of colon cancer, the researchers found, are also more likely to survive it. The paradox, being published today in The Journal of the American Medical Association, could steer researchers toward new treatments and a better understanding of the disease. An estimated 153,000 cases of colon and rectal cancer will be diagnosed in the United States in 2008, according to the American Cancer Society, and about 50,000 people will die of it. Studies of twins show that about 35 percent of colon cancers are inherited, and about 11 percent of patients have at least two close relatives with the disease.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,Sun reporter | March 20, 2008
New findings by California researchers may change the way doctors think about colonoscopy -- a popular screening test for colon and rectal cancer. The research suggests that flat lesions growing on the colon wall are more common than previously thought -- and are five times more likely to be cancerous than the more well-known, protruding growths called polyps. Many doctors are not as familiar with the flat lesions, which are much more difficult to spot during colonoscopy, and may not know how dangerous they can be. "It has been thought in the past that big polyps were the big players that turned into cancer," said Dr. Peter Darwin, director of gastrointestinal endoscopy at the University of Maryland Medical Center.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun reporter | November 15, 2007
J. Robert Hooper, a high-fiving state senator who has served since 1999, announced yesterday that he will resign, citing health problems that have rendered him unable to endure the demands of the statehouse. The 71-year-old Republican from Street has battled colon cancer for the past few years and suffered a mild heart attack in December. Participating in the special session of the legislature the past two weeks convinced him that he cannot keep up with the demands of the office, he said.
FEATURES
By Denise Gellene | August 9, 2007
Adding folic acid to flours, pastas and rice has reduced the rate of spina bifida and anencephaly in the United States, sparing 1,000 babies each year from these devastating birth defects. But a recent study suggests those health gains may have come at a cost: an extra 15,000 cases of colon cancer annually. The report, from Tufts University, is the latest to raise a cautionary note about a public-health policy that has been largely viewed as a success. "Have we done more harm than benefit?"
NEWS
By BRAD K. BERNER | October 12, 1992
Syracuse, New York.--In offering us the real Cristobal Colon, better known as Columbus, TV and Hollywood sanitize one crucial aspect: Colon believed he was God's instrument to redeem Christendom before the Apocalypse.Colon and the effects of his voyages have been lionized and denounced along ethnic, national and patriotic lines, but no one has given a better reason for his travels than Colon himself: ''God made me the messenger of the New Heaven and Earth, as St. John writes in the Apocalypse, after he had spoken of it by the mouth of Isaiah; and he showed me where to go.''Even before he set off on his first voyage, Colon had pledged to his Sovereigns, Isabel and Ferdinand, that the gains of the enterprise would be spent for the reconquest of Jerusalem.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | December 31, 1991
PASADENA, Calif. -- So far this year, there have been outraged ethnic groups and peeved feminists in the build-up for tomorrow's 103rd Rose Parade. Who else can get into the act?How about Mother Nature? Another rain storm is brewing out in the Pacific, and it's scheduled to arrive in Southern California tomorrow, weather forecasters say.As of late yesterday, the best estimates were that the storm will arrive sometime in the afternoon.The parade, featuring 60 floats, 22 bands and 29 equestrian groups, as well as co-grand marshals Cristobal Colon and Rep. Ben Nighthorse Campbell, D-Colo.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,sun reporter | July 8, 2007
Alex Linowitz, a former owner of Lafayette Radio Electronics on North Charles Street and an expert at repairing music boxes, died Friday of complications from Alzheimer's disease at the Fairhaven retirement community in Sykesville. He was 89. Born in New York City and raised in Brooklyn, Mr. Linowitz attended City College of New York. He did not complete his final semester because of financial hardships his family faced during the Depression. "He had to quit school and go to work," said a daughter, Judy Doyle of Reisterstown.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,sun reporter | June 20, 2007
Johns Hopkins researchers are developing a simple blood test that can help doctors determine who needs a colonoscopy, a screening procedure for colon cancer recommended for all adults over 50 - but one considered so unpleasant that many avoid it. The new test, which looks for cancer-related proteins in the blood, identifies colon cancer and precancerous polyps almost as well as a colonoscopy, according to a study published in the journal Cancer Research....
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