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September 28, 1999
Here is an excerpt of an editorial from the San Jose (Calif.) Mercury News, which was published Friday.KEEP your eye on Colombia as it puts its hand in Washington's pocket.President Andrs Pastrana's government is in its worst economic crisis since the Depression and mired in a civil war with drug-growing guerrillas. The currency is falling and unemployment has risen to almost 20 percent. Mr. Pastrana is desperately seeking $3.5 billion in international assistance.Rep. Benjamin Gilman, a New York Republican and chairman of the House International Relations Committee, wants the United States to fork over helicopters, weapons and military training.
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SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2014
Yesterday in one sentence : The gaps in the World Cup schedule, as a very smart person pointed out to me, need to be filled with something, even if it's MLS games. It was too weird without soccer this week, and now there are more days without it than with it until the end of the World Cup. What's on tap : France vs. Germany, noon, ESPN2; Brazil vs. Colombia, 4 p.m., ESPN. What you'll see : Sure, the United States has been eliminated for days, but seeing these matchups should only make everyone, even on this most patriotic day of days, understand why the United States is out and these teams are in. France and Germany have been the class of the European teams so far, while Brazil and Colombia (with respect to Argentina, which hasn't looked great)
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NEWS
By G. JEFFERSON PRICE III | November 8, 2005
Quibdo, Colombia -- The last time Eleana Cordova saw her husband was nine years ago today. His torso was lying in the dirt near the family's modest dwelling in a farming community called Bojaya near the banks of the Atrato River. Nearby lay his legs, and his arms and his head, which, Mrs. Cordova said, had been severed one at a time by a Colombian paramilitary militiaman. Why? Because her husband hesitated when he was ordered to cut the hair of his 1-year-old son. A tradition exists among her people, she explained, in which a boy's hair is not cut until he reaches a certain age, 1 1/2 or 2. But the paramilitary did not care.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
Yesterday in one sentence: Much of the Spanish team has pretty much played year-round since it won in 2010, and we are seeing the fruits of it - it's sadly clear none of them have anything left in the tank. What's on tap: Colombia vs. Ivory Coast, noon, ESPN; Uruguay vs. England, 3 p.m., ESPN; Japan vs. Greece, 6 p.m., ESPN. What you'll see: There are a lot of “musts” in play Thursday in Group C and Group D action. We kick it off with Colombia and the Ivory Coast, both of which are coming off opening-match wins and, with a win Thursday, could all but assure qualification in the next round.
NEWS
October 31, 1999
Here is an excerpt of an editorial from Caretas (Lima, Peru), which was published Sept. 10.COLOMBIA has gotten a reputation as the source of many problems, from guerrillas to narco-traffic. These evils, presumably, originated there and threaten the rest of Latin America.But what if Colombia is more the victim, and the evil is coming in from across its borders?Military sources tell of an intense trade in arms and explosives flooding into Colombia from such countries as the United States, Spain and Ireland.
NEWS
By Andres Oppenheimer | February 28, 2000
WASHINGTON -- It would be an ironic twist of history, but U.S. alarm over the explosion of drug production in Colombia could do what legions of free trade lobbyists have failed to do -- persuade Congress to expand trade preferences to Latin American countries. A soon-to-be-released bipartisan study on U.S. policy toward Colombia by the Council on Foreign Relations, an influential foreign policy interest group, concludes among other things that the U.S. government should "expand trade preferences to help Colombia's economy recover" from its current recession.
NEWS
By Adriana Lopez | December 8, 1998
THE CLINTON administration has just made a rash decision by more than doubling military aid to Colombia. While the aid ostensibly is going to fight the drug war, the Colombian government itself is implicated in the drug trade. And Colombia's military is one of the most brutal in the hemisphere.On Nov. 9, a Colombian air force cargo plane landed at FortLauderdale International Airport with 1,600 pounds of cocaine hidden aboard the aircraft.Gen. Jose Manuel Sandoval, Colombia's air force chief, resigned two days after U.S. officials discovered the cocaine-laden plane.
NEWS
By Luis Morales | September 8, 2005
WASHINGTON - Barring unforeseen U.S. congressional action to re-evaluate the war on drugs in Colombia, what little is left of the South American country's democratic institutions could die prematurely despite U.S. efforts. The lethal injection that put the bloodstained narco-state on that dire course was the so-called Justice and Peace Law, signed July 22 by President Alvaro Uribe. The importance of U.S.-Colombian ties was reflected in Mr. Uribe's visit to President Bush's Crawford, Texas, ranch Aug. 4 to promote the law as a key aspect of legitimizing paramilitaries in Colombia by allowing them to participate in the government.
NEWS
June 22, 1991
Most people know that cocaine retards the brain. What scholars at Colombia's Fedesarollo economic research organization say is that it also badly retards the economy in the country where cocaine is thought to be king. That's something to remember as it sinks in that Pablo Escobar, head of the Medellin cocaine cartel and one of the world's most brutal drug runners, is ensconced in a specially built prison from which he will continue to operate his drug ring.Here's what the economic researchers mean:Drug profits, which have made thugs like Escobar rich, are regularly repatriated as contraband consumer goods.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | May 27, 1994
COLOMBIA may become the world's first narco-ruled country.When elections are held in the South American country Sunday (although the president probably won't be chosen finally until June), it will appear that it is the old party lineup of traditional liberals against conservatives. To outsiders, it won't appear to make much difference.But what is apparently happening was characterized chillingly by Bill Olson, former deputy assistant secretary of state for narcotics, in the April 21 hearings of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee:"It is a tale of corruption and penetration of government and society that cuts to the bone of national life in the country.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2014
Yesterday in one sentence: It's a little early to declare a team completely dead, but Spain looked completely dead yesterday. What's on tap: Colombia vs. Greece, 12 p.m., ABC; Uruguay vs. Costa Rica, 3 p.m.; ABC; England vs. Italy, 6 p.m., ESPN; Ivory Coast vs. Japan, 9 p.m., ESPN. What you'll see: England and Italy are the highest-profile sides to kick off their World Cup campaigns Saturday, but they're far from the most exciting teams that will be in action. That honor goes to one of Uruguay or Colombia, a pair of South American sides that can go a long way toward advancing to the knockout rounds with wins today.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2013
Christopher Adam Wright, a teacher and former restaurant worker, died of an aneurysm Aug. 27 in Bogota, Colombia, where he was working as an English teacher. The former Mount Vernon resident was 40. Born in Towson, he was the son of John T. Wright, a concert producer at Pier Six who lives in Hunt Valley, and Colleen Hill Wright, a child therapist who lives in Jacksonville, Fla. Raised in Jarrettsville, he attended Jarrettsville Elementary School and North Harford Middle School and was a 1991 graduate of Calvert Hall College High School.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2013
The realization that long-distance runner Hannah Oneda would represent the United States at the 2013 Pan Am Junior Athletics Championships in Medellin, Colombia, this weekend didn't fully hit the Westminster native and Winters Mill graduate until she opened a package sent by USA Track & Field recently. Inside the shipment was a suitcase, which included a backpack, a uniform, a podium outfit, a rain jacket, T-shirts and shorts - all embroidered with the Team USA logo. Oneda, a soon-to-be sophomore at Johns Hopkins who earned a spot on the national team by finishing third in the 5,000-meter race at the U.S. Junior National Track & Field championships on June 20 in Des Moines, Iowa, knew the gear was coming, but she was still in awe that her name was listed on the shipping label.
FEATURES
Eduardo Garcia and Carlos Vargas, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2013
BOGOTA - Colombian lawmakers on Wednesday rejected a polarizing bill to allow same-sex marriage in the predominantly Roman Catholic nation, as hundreds of people took to the streets to demonstrate for and against the measure. The bill was rejected by 51 out of 102 lawmakers in the Senate - with 17 in favor. The negative vote was widely expected, given that lawmakers from the ruling coalition had made an alliance to oppose the initiative. Several hundred people rallied in Bogota's main colonial square as lawmakers debated the proposal to allow people of the same sex to marry.
SPORTS
Baltimore Sun reporter | August 18, 2012
Guard Jannah Tucker (New Town) is out for the rest of the FIBA Americas U18 Championship after injuring her left knee Thursday in a 68-28 victory over Argentina. The Americans cruised past Colombia, 87-36, on Friday to complete preliminary play in Gurabo, Puerto Rico. "It's extremely difficult" watching from the bench, said Tucker, who has committed to Tennessee. "But I know that they're going to use this adversity as fuel and continue to play hard like they've been doing. " Maryland recruit Lexie Brown had five points, five steals and four assists against Colombia and six points, two rebounds and two steals against Argentina.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2012
About 100 U.S. Secret Service agents will take part in a two-day ethics training this week to be overseen by professors at the Johns Hopkins University — a response to the widening prostitution scandal that began in Colombia, agency and university officials said Monday. The training, which past participants say covers a broad range of practical and theoretical ethics — including a review of Aristotle — comes as the Secret Service works to address allegations that its agents hired prostitutes in Cartagena days before President Barack Obama arrived in the country April 13 to attend a summit.
NEWS
June 30, 1994
The election of Ernesto Samper as president of Colombia may irritate its relations with the U.S. Mr. Samper is not as zealous about the war against drugs as the U.S. would wish. Nor is he as dedicated to free market economic reforms.A 43-year-old economist running for the Liberal Party of outgoing President Cesar Gavrila, Mr. Samper still carries three bullets from an assassination attempt in 1989 attributed to the Medellin drug cartel. That narco-terrorist organization, allied with leftist guerrillas, declared war on the Colombian state and lost.
NEWS
By DANIEL BLAND | June 16, 2006
A map published this year by the Colombian newsmagazine Semana shows the location of 183 known massacre sites around the country. But the magnitude of the paramilitary slaughter in Colombia likely never will be fully documented. Typically, paramilitary soldiers enter rural villages and round up townspeople they accuse of collaborating with leftist guerrillas. Some are tortured and killed and many others are taken away, never to be seen again. Human rights groups estimate there are tens of thousands of disappearances in Colombia that can be linked to the country's 50-year-long conflict.
NEWS
By David Horsey | April 23, 2012
We have learned a secret of the Secret Service: At least a few of those tight-lipped tough guys are not quite as straight-laced and serious as they appear to be. In fact, they apparently love to party like frat boys. Three Secret Service agents have already lost their jobs after it was revealed that 11 agents and 10 U.S. militarypersonnel engaged the services of as many as 20 prostitutes in one wild night while they were doing advance work for President Obama's visit to Colombia.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2012
Just what is this little cub up to? Good thing its mama is there to catch him or her. The spectacled bear, just four months old, was playing at the zoo in Cali. (Tremarctos ornatus), born in captivity four months ago, is seen with its mother at the zoo in Cali Zoo in Colombia.
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