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By New York Times | January 3, 1991
NEW YORK -- On the day the owners transferred $120 million in collusion damages to money market accounts in two banks in Texas, Mike Witt, one of the players colluded against in 1987, gained his personal benefits yesterday.Witt, a new-look free agent as a result of the collusion settlement between the owners and the players, agreed with the New York Yankees on a three-year contract worth $8 million. The contract makes him the third highest-paid Yankee ever, behind Don Mattingly and Steve Sax.Witt, who has a 114-113 career record, will receive a $500,000 signing bonus and salaries of $2.25 million, $2.75 million and $2 million.
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By Tricia Bishop | tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | January 7, 2010
A Baltimore businessman and aggressive ground rent investor pleaded guilty in federal court Wednesday to illegally rigging bids at Maryland tax lien auctions. Jack W. Stollof, 74, faces up to 10 years in prison and a $1 million fine for violating the Sherman Antitrust Act. His co-defendant and one-time ground rent partner, Harvey M. Nusbaum, is scheduled to go to trial in March on the same charge. Stollof, who will be sentenced after the trial, is not expected to testify, unlike a third defendant who reached a plea deal with the government in 2008.
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By Manny Topol and Manny Topol,Newsday | September 18, 1990
NEW YORK -- Major-league baseball owners were ordered yesterday to pay players at least $102.5 million in lost salary because they conspired to hold down salaries of free agents in the 1987 and 1988 seasons. The decision by arbitrator George Nicolau marks the fifth consecutive decision to go against the owners on collusion. Arbitrators also have ruled that the owners were guilty of suppressing salaries through a free-agent boycott after the 1985, 1986 and 1987 seasons.Last year, the players were awarded $10.5 million by arbitrator Thomas Roberts, who heard the 1986 collusion case.
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By PETER SCHMUCK | May 10, 2008
When the Major League Baseball Players Association confirmed the other day that it's investigating whether the 30 big league clubs are conspiring to keep Barry Bonds out of the game this year, I couldn't help but laugh. Does anyone seriously believe it would take some nefarious scheme to convince everyone in the game to steer clear of Bad News Barry at a point in his career when he is (a) 43 years old; (b) barely mobile; (c) under federal indictment for perjury in the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative grand jury investigation; and (d)
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | August 14, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The Securities and Exchange Commission learned of possible broker collusion on the Nasdaq stock market as early as December 1992, but didn't open a formal investigation for nearly two years, SEC documents show."
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By LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 31, 2003
LOS ANGELES - As Vladimir Guerrero, Miguel Tejada, Gary Sheffield, Andy Pettitte and several other high-caliber players prepare to test baseball's free-agent market, the players' union is considering filing a grievance through the industry's legal channels that would charge owners with acting in collusion to fix salaries during last winter's slow signing season. Donald Fehr, the union's executive director, would not comment. Sources close to the situation said Wednesday they did not know whether the union would officially act on its conviction that owners violated the bargaining agreement last winter or would simply use the threat of a grievance as warning against collusive activity this winter.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | May 10, 2008
When the Major League Baseball Players Association confirmed the other day that it's investigating whether the 30 big league clubs are conspiring to keep Barry Bonds out of the game this year, I couldn't help but laugh. Does anyone seriously believe it would take some nefarious scheme to convince everyone in the game to steer clear of Bad News Barry at a point in his career when he is (a) 43 years old; (b) barely mobile; (c) under federal indictment for perjury in the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative grand jury investigation; and (d)
SPORTS
September 19, 1990
A chronology of events in baseball's collusion cases:* Feb. 3, 1986 -- The Major League Baseball Players Association filed the first collusion grievance, charging owners acted in concert in a boycott of free agents after the 1985 season.* Feb. 20, 1987 -- The union filed a second grievance, charging the boycott extended beyond the 1986 season.* Sept. 21, 1987 -- Arbitrator Thomas Roberts ruled that teams conspired to "destroy" free agency after the 1985 season.* Jan. 19, 1988 -- The union filed a third grievance, charging the boycott continued in part after the 1987 season and that management's Player Relations Committee operated a free agent "information bank" in violation of the collective-bargaining agreement.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 18, 2003
LONDON - Officers from British Army intelligence and the Royal Ulster Constabulary in Northern Ireland helped Protestant guerrillas kill Roman Catholics in the late 1980s, a report by Britain's senior police official said yesterday. Sir John Stevens, commissioner of London's Metropolitan Police, said his 14-year investigation into the explosive allegations of official collusion had found that members of the army's covert Force Research Unit, which handled informants, and the police Special Branch espionage arm "were allowed to operate without effective control and to participate in terrorist crimes."
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By BILL ORDINE | March 21, 2008
Earlier this week, the Major League Baseball Players Association said it would look into whether there is collusion involved in Barry Bonds not being signed by a big league team so far this year. He has been in search of a new team since being released by San Francisco. Understand that union head Don Fehr isn't exactly breathing fire on this one. In fact, he's speaking kind of gingerly, saying that he's not making any accusations.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | March 21, 2008
Earlier this week, the Major League Baseball Players Association said it would look into whether there is collusion involved in Barry Bonds not being signed by a big league team so far this year. He has been in search of a new team since being released by San Francisco. Understand that union head Don Fehr isn't exactly breathing fire on this one. In fact, he's speaking kind of gingerly, saying that he's not making any accusations.
NEWS
October 12, 2007
Step by step, the freedoms, the accountability and the confidence in justice that Americans used to take for granted are being shorn away, and that "What next?" feeling leads too often to shrugged shoulders rather than real outrage. This week, the Supreme Court colluded with the administration to give the government legal immunity even when it abducts and tortures innocent people. All the government lawyers have to do is utter the magic phrase "state secrets" and apparently even the most appalling cases of misconduct can be granted a free pass, and draped in a cloak of darkness.
SPORTS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 31, 2003
LOS ANGELES - As Vladimir Guerrero, Miguel Tejada, Gary Sheffield, Andy Pettitte and several other high-caliber players prepare to test baseball's free-agent market, the players' union is considering filing a grievance through the industry's legal channels that would charge owners with acting in collusion to fix salaries during last winter's slow signing season. Donald Fehr, the union's executive director, would not comment. Sources close to the situation said Wednesday they did not know whether the union would officially act on its conviction that owners violated the bargaining agreement last winter or would simply use the threat of a grievance as warning against collusive activity this winter.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 18, 2003
LONDON - Officers from British Army intelligence and the Royal Ulster Constabulary in Northern Ireland helped Protestant guerrillas kill Roman Catholics in the late 1980s, a report by Britain's senior police official said yesterday. Sir John Stevens, commissioner of London's Metropolitan Police, said his 14-year investigation into the explosive allegations of official collusion had found that members of the army's covert Force Research Unit, which handled informants, and the police Special Branch espionage arm "were allowed to operate without effective control and to participate in terrorist crimes."
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 22, 2000
WASHINGTON - Sensing as much political promise as peril in soaring gasoline prices, Vice President Al Gore has unleashed an unusually harsh condemnation of the oil industry, accusing energy companies of "collusion" and price "gouging." Gore issued a statement late Tuesday night decrying what he called oil industry profit gains of "500 percent in the first part of this year" and demanding an investigation into allegations of price fixing and collusion. "These enormous and unreasonable profits suggest that Big Oil is gouging American consumers," Gore said.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | December 6, 1998
Baseball owners got together in Chicago this past week to discuss the economic state of the game and explore ways -- short of collusion -- to bridge the widening gap between the big-revenue and small-revenue teams.They did not reach any hard-and-fast conclusions, and they certainly did not publicly propose another all-out war with the Major League Baseball Players Association over cost control, but they did make it clear that the competitive crisis that they predicted in the early 1990s has come to pass.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Sun Staff Correspondent | March 5, 1991
SARASOTA, Fla. -- All is not quiet on baseball's labor front, where only a year ago player and management officials expressed hope for better relations in the future.Major League Players Association director Donald Fehr said yesterday that the union already has begun amassing a strike fund for the next round of negotiations."We're setting aside one-third of the licensing money to get ready," he told reporters after a meeting with Baltimore Orioles players yesterday.He added, however, that cooperation between the union and Major League Baseball has improved in some areas.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | June 3, 1995
NEW YORK -- The Justice Department is speeding up its antitrust probe of the Nasdaq stock market by imposing an early-summer deadline for investigators to come up with preliminary results of their findings.Assistant Attorney General Anne Bingaman has asked the government's team of a half-dozen attorneys and economists looking into possible collusion among Nasdaq dealers to report their findings by the end of June, a person at the Justice Department said.The securities industry was skeptical the government has found any smoking gun to prove that Nasdaq market makers colluded to keep the difference, or spreads, between stock bid and ask prices unusually large.
NEWS
September 25, 1998
THE CLINTON administration this week moved to temporarily ban the overseas sales of U.S. ships for dismantling. Better late than never.The executive memo, issued by Vice President Al Gore, means the U.S. Navy and the Maritime Administration will end their complicity with the environmentally unsound and dangerous offshore shipbreaking industry, at least for the next year. The memo, which has the force of law, is a victory for the environment and, therefore, all of us.But it especially benefits the poorly paid and untrained workers in the wretched shipyards of South Asia described in a series of articles last year by Sun reporters Gary Cohn and Will Englund.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 29, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The Justice Department's criminal division is investigating allegations that Senate Republicans and the tobacco industry violated federal law by illegally colluding to torpedo anti-smoking legislation in June.The department quietly informed Senate Democratic Leader Tom Daschle on Aug. 17 that it would examine whether the industry and Senate Republicans engaged in an illegal quid pro quo: political advertising in exchange for votes."The allegation that tobacco companies may have promised favorable political advertising in exchange for a senator's vote on specific legislation raises concerns under the bribery and gratuity statutes," wrote Assistant Attorney General L. Anthony Sutin.
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