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By Artika Rangan and Artika Rangan,SUN STAFF | August 22, 2004
Harford Community College and the University of Maryland University College are to sign an agreement Wednesday allowing HCC students with associate degrees the option of transferring to various UMUC degree programs. Under the alliance, transfer students could enroll in UMUC programs that include accounting, business administration, computer science, computer and information science, computer studies, environmental management, human resource management, information systems management, legal studies, management studies, psychology and secondary teacher education.
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October 28, 2011
Officials at McDaniel College in Westminster said Friday, Oct. 28, that the college has been named on a list of "Best Value" colleges by Kiplinger's Personal Finance - the only Maryland liberal arts college to make the list. The rankings are available online at Kiplinger's website, and will be published in the magazine's December issue, which is actually circulated beginning Nov. 8. McDaniel came in at No. 92 among liberal arts college's nationwide. While the Westminster school was the only liberal arts college from Maryland on the list, three other universities from the state earned the "value" ranking: Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore (No. 25)
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NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Sun Staff Writer | August 3, 1994
It would be uncharacteristic of Carmen Alban not to have some kind of work in addition to her college course load.But the prestigious scholarship the Hampstead native just won will help her devote more time to earning her English degree at Towson State University.Instead of working 20 to 40 hours a week outside of her classes as she has in the past, she will be able to work just eight hours a week at her job and to put more time into The Write Answer, a tutoring and paper-editing business she started this year from her home in Cockeysville.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,stephen.kiehl@baltsun.com | November 5, 2008
For months, young people have knocked on doors, made phone calls and given money to support Sen. Barack Obama. Yesterday, they finally had a chance to vote for him. "It's like cool to vote now. It's a fashion statement," said Lola Olakanye, 22, a senior at the University of Maryland, College Park, who left class early to go home to Silver Spring to vote. "If you don't vote, you're lame." Young voters turned out across the country yesterday in numbers unprecedented in recent history, exit polls found, a surge propelled by anxiety over the economy, frustration with the war in Iraq and, perhaps most of all, a sense of connection to Obama.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 31, 1997
A federal judge has ruled that the Maryland Higher Education Commission did not discriminate when it denied state subsidies to a religious college in Montgomery County because the college's operations are too closely intertwined with its affiliated denomination.Judge Marvin J. Garbis threw out a suit Tuesday filed by Columbia Union College in Takoma Park after it was denied $750,000 in state subsidies by the commission last year."I'm glad the judge agreed with us and that the opinion was so strongly worded," Patricia S. Florestano, Maryland secretary of higher education, said after she learned of the ruling yesterday.
NEWS
July 21, 1992
In the new fiscal realities of the 1990s, public colleges and universities must refine their objectives and narrow their priorities. No longer can institutions squabble over academic turf and constantly seek to expand academic offerings. There's not enough money for that any longer.Leading the charge into this new campus reality is the University of Maryland College Park. Over an 18-month period, administrators, deans, professors and students looked over College Park's course offerings and uncovered some low-priority items that could be sacrificed.
NEWS
May 23, 1995
The recently announced $1 million gift to Harford Community College by a Havre de Grace couple recognizes the expanding importance of HCC and other community colleges in Maryland as academic and cultural resources. It is hoped that this donation inspires similar gestures by other benefactors to these valuable local institutions.The gift by Mr. and Mrs. Barclay Tucker, which will pass to the college after their death, is believed to be the largest ever to a Maryland community college. Harford Community College, which Mrs. Tucker attended in the 1970s, has for decades provided an essential passage to higher education for many youths in Harford County.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,Sun Staff Writer | August 1, 1995
While it's not unusual for college-bound high school students to visit campuses before deciding where they want to attend, some now are doing so with computers -- via World Wide Web pages on the Internet.Colleges in Maryland, as well as most major universities around the country, are going on-line with their school's academic and social information in an effort to catch the attention of high school Internet surfers.These "virtual visits" can yield much of the same information with a few clicks of the mouse on a computer as an in-person tour of colleges, say university representatives and Web site managers.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2003
Hoping to promote the value of their campuses at a time of deep cuts in state funding, the leaders of Maryland's 16 community colleges released a study yesterday showing the system adds $5.6 billion annually to the state's economy. That number includes wages and benefits to employees, the additional income generated as those funds are spent, capital spending and higher annual earnings for graduates, according to the study released at the Maryland Association of Counties conference in Ocean City.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Staff Writer | December 3, 1993
A Maryland philanthropy with a long history of gifts to higher education will set up a $5 million endowment to support minority scholarships at four private colleges in Maryland, officials announced yesterday.Proceeds from the endowment to be set up by the Hodson Trust will be shared by the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Hood College in Frederick, St. John's College in Annapolis and Washington College in Chestertown.Although the trust has given more than $49 million to the four colleges since 1936, the endowment represents its first major gift earmarked for minority scholarships.
NEWS
April 14, 2007
Patronage passing as aid for college? After reading The Sun's article "College grants under attack" (April 4), it occurred to us that this issue has been debated for several decades. Yet no one seems to discuss the fact that the legislative scholarships are an unnecessary duplication of other state programs. The Maryland Higher Education Commission has overseen the administration of the Guaranteed Access Grant and the Educational Assistance Grant for many years. These programs provide help to needy students who want and deserve to attend colleges in Maryland.
NEWS
By Artika Rangan and Artika Rangan,SUN STAFF | August 22, 2004
Harford Community College and the University of Maryland University College are to sign an agreement Wednesday allowing HCC students with associate degrees the option of transferring to various UMUC degree programs. Under the alliance, transfer students could enroll in UMUC programs that include accounting, business administration, computer science, computer and information science, computer studies, environmental management, human resource management, information systems management, legal studies, management studies, psychology and secondary teacher education.
NEWS
April 26, 2004
Md. could face its own crisis in access to college Mike Bowler's column "College rank, rejections go hand in hand" (April 21) probably struck a chord with many college applicants and their parents, who may understandably be more than a little dismayed to learn that in being rejected by a selective university or college, they could actually be helping to boost that institution's national ranking. Mr. Bowler writes: "In the twisted value system of higher education in America, it's considered good to be selective, bad to be scrambling for students."
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2003
Hoping to promote the value of their campuses at a time of deep cuts in state funding, the leaders of Maryland's 16 community colleges released a study yesterday showing the system adds $5.6 billion annually to the state's economy. That number includes wages and benefits to employees, the additional income generated as those funds are spent, capital spending and higher annual earnings for graduates, according to the study released at the Maryland Association of Counties conference in Ocean City.
NEWS
By Roger Clegg | April 5, 2001
WASHINGTON -- A study by two Maryland social scientists, Robert Lerner and Althea Nagai, raises disturbing questions about the role that race and ethnicity play in college admissions all over the country. The 64-page study, released in February by the Center for Equal Opportunity, analyzes data from 47 schools nationwide and concludes that such discrimination is pervasive. Unfortunately, another recent study by the same authors also published by the CEO finds evidence that the Maryland higher education system is no exception.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | February 25, 2001
The program was tailored to a college audience: popular rock songs, a little swing and a few ballads. But there was no band on stage that night at Shriver Hall on the Johns Hopkins University campus. No drums, no guitars, no pianos. Just a few microphones reflecting the bright lights above the bare stage. Over the next two hours, Hopkins' seven a cappella groups - 73 singers - formed tight semicircles around the microphones, not only providing the harmonies of songs such as Toni Braxton's "Un-Break My Heart," the Goo Goo Dolls' "Black Balloon" and ABBA's "Dancing Queen," but voicing the "chika-chika" of the cymbals, the "wah-wah" of the guitar, the "bum-bum" of the bass and an assortment of whoops, plings and other noises.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,SUN STAFF | April 23, 1996
Howard Community College trustees have voted to raise tuition 4.1 percent for county residents in a move the college's student government leader said was needed to help the school keep pace with technology.Beginning the second summer session, tuition will rise to $76 a credit from $73 a credit for county residents, with the maximum tuition rising to $1,140 per semester from $1,095 per semester.Maryland students living outside Howard County will pay $6 more per credit, or $123. The rate for students living outside the state will rise to $175 a credit from $150 a credit.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,stephen.kiehl@baltsun.com | November 5, 2008
For months, young people have knocked on doors, made phone calls and given money to support Sen. Barack Obama. Yesterday, they finally had a chance to vote for him. "It's like cool to vote now. It's a fashion statement," said Lola Olakanye, 22, a senior at the University of Maryland, College Park, who left class early to go home to Silver Spring to vote. "If you don't vote, you're lame." Young voters turned out across the country yesterday in numbers unprecedented in recent history, exit polls found, a surge propelled by anxiety over the economy, frustration with the war in Iraq and, perhaps most of all, a sense of connection to Obama.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 31, 1997
A federal judge has ruled that the Maryland Higher Education Commission did not discriminate when it denied state subsidies to a religious college in Montgomery County because the college's operations are too closely intertwined with its affiliated denomination.Judge Marvin J. Garbis threw out a suit Tuesday filed by Columbia Union College in Takoma Park after it was denied $750,000 in state subsidies by the commission last year."I'm glad the judge agreed with us and that the opinion was so strongly worded," Patricia S. Florestano, Maryland secretary of higher education, said after she learned of the ruling yesterday.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 22, 1997
Maryland campuses made a modest appearance in this year's 11th annual U.S. News & World Report college rankings, which were released yesterday by the weekly newsmagazine.While editors caution readers to use the guide as only one of many factors in selecting a college, the U.S. News rankings have prompted deep interest among students and parents, who have made the edition the magazine's best-selling issue each year.The ratings have also caused widespread apprehension -- and the occasional public relations boon -- for academic administrators seeking to burnish their campuses' reputations.
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