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By Robert H. Chambers | November 26, 1991
WHEN Gary Cooper met "High Noon's" villains in the classic showdown on a dusty main street in the Old West, there was little doubt who would win out.Old "Coop" gunned down the bad guys, tossed his marshal's star in the dust as a sign of contempt at the cowardice of the lily-livered townsfolk who failed to stand up with him against the evil forces, and left on his honeymoon with Grace Kelly. In "High Noon" the good guy won, and his reward was to ride into the sunset with his best girl.This classic shoot-out is now in the process of being re-enacted, but not in the dust of a godforsaken cow town.
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NEWS
August 21, 2014
University of Maryland Baltimore County President Freeman A. Hrabowski III says he is not interested in becoming chancellor of the University System of Maryland. That is a shame. He is extraordinarily qualified for the job, and if he could do for the entire system what he has done for UMBC, Maryland would benefit enormously. He has spearheaded innovative new approaches to teaching and learning, particularly in math and the sciences, and he has fostered the kind of linkages between students and employers that Maryland needs to grow its innovation economy.
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NEWS
February 19, 1998
NOTHING William E. Kirwan has said in his long career at the University of Maryland compares with the responsive chord he struck in explaining why he's leaving. His criticisms have given impetus to a major reassessment of how public higher education is treated in Maryland.It won't be easy to change a mind-set that has held state colleges in low regard for so long. In the past 10 years, state support for these schools has dropped from 50 percent of total budget to 30 percent -- far too little for Maryland's public universities to begin (or continue)
NEWS
By John L. Hudgins | June 2, 2014
As the nation moves toward President Obama's goal of college degrees for 60 percent of Americans by 2020, the role of historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) becomes even more important - particularly in Maryland, where 48 percent of African American students attend one of four HBCUs, compared with 16 percent nationwide. A college degree is more important than ever, with the pay gap between college graduates and non-graduates reaching a record high last year. According to a Washington Post report, graduates earned on average nearly double the hourly rate of non-graduates.
NEWS
October 13, 1997
NOW THAT REGENTS have agreed to limit tuition increases to 4 percent a year at the University System of Maryland's 13 institutions, it is up to Gov. Parris N.Glendening to boost government support of higher education in Maryland. It would be the best possible investment in this state's future growth.The governor, as well as legislative leaders, protested higher tuition increases they felt might make a college education unaffordable for some students. That protest persuaded the regents to pledge to hold future down increases.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Architecture Critic | March 5, 2000
When Adam Gross moved to Baltimore in 1984 to help revive an old-guard architectural firm, he was eager to take on a wide range of commissions. Today, as design principal of the company, he is turning down many of the assignments he might have accepted 16 years ago. Yet his firm, now called Ayers Saint Gross, is as busy as ever. Billings are up. The staff is expanding. The company is increasingly becoming known as a "national" firm, with more work outside Maryland than in. All this growth is fueled by Ayers Saint Gross' decision to specialize in one area: design work for colleges and universities.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | May 18, 1999
It's crunch time at many college campuses.The coffee is percolating. Almost-new textbooks are cracked open. Fingers click away at computer keyboards from morning until night. The stress level is high as college students across the state prepare for end-of-the-year exams.Too many all-nighters? Got the caffeine jitters?To help students calm their wracked nerves, many colleges are offering some relief. Whether it's free massages or color therapy at Towson University, yoga at the University of Michigan or free Ben & Jerry's ice cream bars at the University of Iowa, colleges around the country are getting into the game.
NEWS
January 9, 2012
Has Maryland reneged on its promise to desegregate the state's public institutions of higher learning? Has the state, in defiance of the law, continued to operate a dual system of separate and unequal schools based on race? The answer to such questions will decide the outcome of a potentially historic case that opened last week pitting the state's four historically black colleges and universities against the Maryland Higher Education Commission. At issue is whether the state has truly succeeded in overcoming the shameful legacy of its segregated past, or whether it has simply extended the policies and practices of that era into the present under a different guise.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | November 20, 1996
THE POWERS that be (and a few that were) in Maryland higher education and business held a first-ever "summit" yesterday and looked south, across the Potomac, for advice and inspiration.Filling an auditorium at the new University of Maryland Baltimore County Technology Center, leaders of the state's colleges and universities heard "the Virginia experience" from a former commonwealth governor and from a current chairman of the Virginia Business Higher Education Council.Maryland has an inferiority complex about Virginia colleges and universities.
NEWS
November 16, 2009
B y now the dangers of smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke are so well established that hardly anyone disputes the risks they pose to public health and well-being. Every year some 390,000 Americans die from smoking-related illnesses, and tobacco contributes to 1 out of every 6 deaths annually in this country. That's why we applaud Towson University's decision last week to ban smoking everywhere on its campus. We only wonder why it took the university this long to take a step that so obviously benefits its students and the entire school community.
NEWS
March 18, 2014
The total per credit cost for in-county students at Harford Community College was increased last week to $124.80, which translates to $374.40 for a single three-credit class. It's hardly a king's ransom. College officials are also quick to point out that it is a bargain relative to the cost of attending even a Maryland college system facility as an in-state student. Still, as has been noted before, the latest round of increases (to fees rather than tuition, a distinction that's meaningful only to hair-splitters)
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2014
Sojourner-Douglass College in Baltimore is in danger of losing its accreditation and faces serious financial challenges, leaving the small private college's future uncertain. The Middle States Commission on Higher Education, the accrediting body for colleges in Maryland and several other states, directed Sojourner-Douglass College officials last week to "show cause," or prove by Sept. 1 why its accreditation should not be revoked. The college's president, Charles W. Simmons, said Wednesday that officials were in the midst of a plan to rescue the institution's finances and they believed they were close to having at least one investor commit money to help.
NEWS
March 10, 2014
The decisions taken by the American Studies Association, a small, relatively obscure scholarly organization devoted to the study of American history and culture, rarely resonate much beyond the ivied walls of academe. But earlier this year the group created an unaccustomed stir when its members voted to endorse a boycott of Israeli academic institutions as a way of protesting that country's treatment of Palestinians. Supporters of the Jewish state were quick to denounce the move as anti-Semitic and anti-Israel, a charge the ASA denied.
NEWS
February 10, 2014
According to a recent White House report, one out of every five young women is victimized by a sexual assault during her college years. Yet nearly half those crimes are never reported to school officials or to police. Only about 12 percent of students formally report a sexual assault on campus, investigators found, with the result that such acts have become one of the most underreported crimes against college women. That is why Del. Jon S. Cardin, a Baltimore County Democrat and candidate for attorney general, has introduced legislation in this year's General Assembly that would require Maryland's colleges and universities to conduct anonymous surveys among women students in order to determine how commonly incidents of sexual assault actually occur on the state's campuses.
NEWS
By Anne D. Neal | October 16, 2013
Donors give billions of dollars every year to higher education, and, in many ways, they are the lifeblood of our colleges and universities. When it comes to college giving, New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg's philanthropy to Johns Hopkins University leads the way. His $350 million gift to his alma mater is the largest collegiate donation in 2013. Indeed, with the value of many university endowments depressed and state appropriations cut, donors play an ever-more important role in supporting and sustaining our institutions of higher education.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2013
The Johns Hopkins University edged closer to the top 10 of national universities on the U.S. News and World Report annual rankings, which were released Tuesday. U.S. News moved Hopkins up one spot to No. 12, just behind Dartmouth College and tied with Northwestern University, in the most-often cited of numerous college rankings. It was the highest ranking for Hopkins in 14 years. As expected based on prior rankings, Princeton, Harvard and Yale remained in the top three spots, in that order.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | September 25, 1996
The Sept. 25 Education Beat incorrectly reported that Barron's charges for entries in its college guidebook. We regret the error.SEPTEMBER is the Month of College Guidebooks. Time and Newsweek this month have joined Money and U.S. News & World Report in offering cover-story ratings and advice on the habits and habitats of the nation's colleges and universities.If we add the traditional guides -- Barron's, Peterson's, Lovejoy's and the like -- we have what has become a major industry. Why?
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2004
THREE OF Virginia's most prestigious institutions of higher education are seeking independence from the commonwealth as "chartered universities." In return for freedom from state regulation, say officials at the College of William & Mary, the University of Virginia and Virginia Tech, they will find their own financial way and rely less on state financing. In short, they will walk the walk and talk the talk of private institutions, which in many ways they already are. For example, in the past 20 years, state aid to the University of Virginia has declined from nearly 28 percent of the operating budget to 8.1 percent.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2012
Nathaniel M. Pigman Jr., a retired statistician and teacher, died of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and congestive heart failure Oct. 15 at the Gilchrist Hospice Care in Columbia. He was 92 and had lived in Columbia and Edgewater. Born in Bremerton, Wash., he moved with his father, who served in the Navy, throughout the Pacific area as a child. He earned a bachelor of arts at the University of Virginia, where he also attended law school and was admitted to the Virginia Bar. Family members said he never practiced.
NEWS
October 28, 2012
Maryland's Dream Act, which allows some illegal immigrants to pay in-state tuition at public colleges and universities, has drawn attention far out of proportion to its actual impact. Only a few hundred students are likely to be eligible for the benefit in any given year, but because it touches on the issue of who should be in this country and how we treat them, it has led to vocal and passionate campaigns on both sides. But there's a practical component to the issue, too. The Dream Act is a good investment for Maryland taxpayers, and for that reason, voters should support Question 4 on November's ballot.
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