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NEWS
April 29, 2013
The proposed $60 million apartment-and-retail development proposed for the Towson Triangle is dredging up an old ambivalence about the character of the Baltimore County seat. Is it a college town? A community for families and children? A commercial downtown? A shopping and entertainment district? A home for empty-nesters? It is, and long has been, all of the above, coexisting in what is at times an uneasy balance that grows more uneasy periodically when any one segment of the community seeks to expand its presence.
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BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
This week another piece of the redevelopment of downtown Towson falls into place as a 90,000-square-foot, 15-screen Cinemark theater ushers in its first moviegoers Thursday. Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz said Towson Square and the theater are part of an estimated $800 million in private investment that is revitalizing Towson, including the new 52,000-square-foot LA Fitness facility that replaced the old eight-screen AMC theater in Towson Commons. The $20 million theater - the anchor of the 150,00-square-foot Towson Square development - is less than a quarter-mile from one of the region's largest malls, Towson Town Center.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2014
A gleaming new apartment building with restaurants and bars on the ground floor has replaced an old pizza place and tire shop. A new Whole Foods will sprout up just down the road. A four-star hotel and bike lanes are planned. The changes are part of a longer-term effort to transform U.S. 1 - the University of Maryland, College Park's main drag - from a jumbled mix of strip malls and fast-food joints. After a decade of slow progress, the building spree jump-starts a plan to remake the city of College Park into a "real" college town.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2014
A gleaming new apartment building with restaurants and bars on the ground floor has replaced an old pizza place and tire shop. A new Whole Foods will sprout up just down the road. A four-star hotel and bike lanes are planned. The changes are part of a longer-term effort to transform U.S. 1 - the University of Maryland, College Park's main drag - from a jumbled mix of strip malls and fast-food joints. After a decade of slow progress, the building spree jump-starts a plan to remake the city of College Park into a "real" college town.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | January 30, 1998
Speaking to the College Democrats of the Johns Hopkins University yesterday evening, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke discussed the city's efforts to make the North Charles Street area and Baltimore in general more of a "big-league college town.""There is a commitment now," Schmoke told the group of 40 students in a classroom on the Homewood campus in North Baltimore. "I've met with the area's college presidents to discuss changes we need to market Baltimore as a college town."The mayor noted that up to 100,000 college students are in the Baltimore area during the academic year.
BUSINESS
By Sarah Cohen and Sarah Cohen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 3, 1996
Fast-food restaurants, auto dealers and bars touting beer specials fill the area adjacent to Maryland's biggest school. But the century-old neighborhoods in College Park remain remarkably aloof from the university town that most visitors see.On a recent autumn Saturday, the U.S. 1 corridor began jamming with cars at 10 a.m., early enough for University of Maryland football fans to begin the traditional pre-game tailgate parties.A few blocks away, in the Berwyn section, a troop of Brownies could skip across the street near a church, unaware of the football fuss.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | April 18, 1998
It's a long way from Harvard Square, Berkeley's caffeinated campus or even College Park. Johns Hopkins University is a perpetual puzzle for people living around the Homewood campus, who wonder why it has never fostered a college town atmosphere.Where are the telltale signs of student life -- bustling bookstores, cheap eats, music in the air and theaters showing old movies?"Eventually you reconcile yourself to it," says junior Chad Beck, sitting in a circle of friends sipping cafe lattes and bottled water.
NEWS
By Debbie M. Price and Debbie M. Price,SUN STAFF | September 8, 1996
What comes to mind when you think of Baltimore?Crabs?Check.Cal?Check.College town?Come again?There are in the Baltimore area 22 colleges, universities, community colleges and institutes of higher learning. All told, the schools enroll about 100,0000 students. But ask folks, even those in the thick of academia, whether they consider Baltimore a college town, and the response is, well, bemused surprise."A college town? Hmm, interesting," says H. Mebane Turner, president of the University of Baltimore.
TRAVEL
By Hal Smith and Hal Smith,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 31, 2003
One of the best-kept secrets about New York is that, about an hour north of the Big Apple, the state is a mostly rural and often unsophisticated place. Case in point: I live near an upstate village where, shopping in our only supermarket, I once asked a clerk where the artichoke hearts were hiding. She looked puzzled for a moment before her face brightened and she asked, "Have you checked the meat department?" So in 1997, it might have come as a surprise when the leading "alternative" magazine, Utne Reader, put upstate Ithaca at the top of its list of the 10 most enlightened towns in the United States.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrew Noyes and Andrew Noyes,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 3, 2004
Blink twice and you might miss Shepherdstown, W. Va.'s picturesque main drag lined with quaint shops, art galleries and family-owned restaurants. Stick around for a weekend, and you might just fall in love with this West Virginia town that's surprisingly close to Baltimore. It's a mellow place, and, given the community's size, it draws folks from all walks of life and who have traveled around the world, native Betsy Coffey says. She grew up here but "couldn't wait to get out and find a place with two movie theaters."
NEWS
Susan Reimer | May 13, 2013
My town, Annapolis, is a special kind of college town. The students at the Naval Academy are distinctive not for their backpacks, ear buds and school T-shirts, but for their crisp summer whites and their somber dress blues. The midshipmen take off their hats - their covers - when they enter a building, and they say "sir" and "ma'am" when you greet them. At this college, you don't pay anything unless you quit or get kicked out. About 1,400 arrive every July, but only about 800 will graduate four years later.
NEWS
April 29, 2013
The proposed $60 million apartment-and-retail development proposed for the Towson Triangle is dredging up an old ambivalence about the character of the Baltimore County seat. Is it a college town? A community for families and children? A commercial downtown? A shopping and entertainment district? A home for empty-nesters? It is, and long has been, all of the above, coexisting in what is at times an uneasy balance that grows more uneasy periodically when any one segment of the community seeks to expand its presence.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2013
Towson is more than a college town. Towson Tavern gets that. The restaurant opened on New Year's Eve 2011 on York Road, near the Towson Circle. The area is well-known for bars and pubs, but Towson Tavern stands out from the pack: Instead of catering to college students, it's geared toward adults. At Towson Tavern, that maturity manifests in an interesting selection of cocktails, a sophisticated menu and sharp service. Executive Chef Tyson Spangler was at The Capital Grille prior to running the kitchen at Towson Tavern; General Manager Michael Velleggia was part of the Capital Grille team, as well.
SPORTS
Mike Preston | March 1, 2013
Every year in college lacrosse there seems to be a Delaware, Lehigh or Loyola, a team no one figured to be one of the nation's top contenders. Could Penn State be that team in 2013? There wasn't anything unusual about the Nittany Lions' 11-6 season-opening win against Michigan, but Penn State drew some attention with a 15-12 upset of No. 10 Denver on Feb.17. Then when Penn State took No. 3 Notre Dame to overtime in a 10-9 loss Sunday - a game that featured four lead changes and seven ties - the lacrosse world took notice.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2012
One day when I was driving to the courthouse for the George Huguely trial, I ended up behind a cab that had not just its phone number painted on the trunk but this invocation: "Metaphors be with you. " A couple of turns later, I was following an SUV with a vanity plate making a pun of its own: RKOLOGY. I don't remember how many blocks it took me to figure that one out, but you know you're in a college town when even the cars are making bons mots. We probably all know people who can never quite leave the town where they went to school.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2012
WEATHER Today's forecast calls for sunny skies with a high near 52 degrees. It is expected to be mostly cloudy tonight, with a low temperature around 34 degrees. The National Weather Service is forecasting a chance of snow Wednesday, mainly in the afternoon and evening. TRAFFIC Check our updates for this morning's issues as you plan your commute. FROM LAST NIGHT... Bill would OK table games and casino site in P.G. Co. : The bill, sponsored by Sen. Douglas J.J. Peters, would put both the table games component of the legislation and the provision allowing a sixth casino in the state before voters in November.
TRAVEL
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,[Sun reporter ] | December 17, 2006
CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA. -- John Grisham bought a plantation on the outskirts of town once his best-selling books became blockbusters. Howie Long relocated his family to the area after retiring from an all-pro football career in California. And Dave Mat-thews formed his band in this laid-back college town. It seems writers, actors and celebrities have flocked to Charlottesville for its tranquil yet urbane existence. Visitors will find its Colonial history, Piedmont wine country and preppy university atmosphere equally alluring.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,Sun reporter | August 31, 2006
The city's Board of Estimates agreed yesterday to spend $21 million to support the "College Town" development that is rising in the Charles Village streets bordering the Johns Hopkins University's Homewood campus, an investment that gives City Hall a profit-sharing piece of the project. In return for taxpayer-backed money, the city will own a substantial portion of a parking garage that will be open to the public and will guarantee substantial improvements to sidewalks along the St. Paul Street corridor between 30th and 34th streets.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2011
The Daily Meal, a food-and-dining website, has published list of the 10 Best College Towns for Food. Baltimore didn't make the list, but Baltimore isn't a college town. So, no hard feelings. The top ten college towns for food were 1) Berkeley, Calif., Ann Arbor, Mich., Princeton, N.J., Oxford, Miss., Chapel Hill, N.C., Burlington, Vt., Eugene, Ore., Ithaca, N.Y., Boulder, Colo., and Madison, Wis. Here's that list on TheDailyMeal.com. Did your old college town show up?
EXPLORE
September 1, 2011
Venus Theatre, 21 C St., presents the world premiere of "The Stenographer" on Friday, Sept. 2 at 8 p.m. Written by Zoe Mavroudi, of Athens, Greece, and directed by Venus Theatre founder Deborah Randall, the drama, set in a suburban house in a college town near New York, presents an internal storm where integrity clashes with philosophical rationalizations, alcohol and literary analysis. Play runs Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 3 p.m. through September.
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