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NEWS
March 14, 2010
About 40 college students from four schools are trying to defend their networks from a team of hackers during the fifth annual Mid-Atlantic Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition. Saturday was the second day of competition. Participating are students from Asheville-Buncombe Technical College, Community College of Baltimore County, Millersville University and Towson University. - Associated Press
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2014
Under cloudy skies, volunteers were busy Saturday afternoon installing panels of the Monument Quilt on the verdant Federal Hill Park lawn. Walkers and tourists paused to read the emotionally wrenching messages - numbering in the hundreds - from survivors of rape and sexual abuse from across the country that are written on squares sewn into the multicolored and textured quilt. "I was scared, hiding my emotions away, hidden behind a mask that fooled people for years. I tore away the mask & began my long journey on the road to recovery.
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EXPLORE
March 5, 2013
Alexander Pendleton, of Laurel, was named to the honor roll for the fall semester at the University of Kansas, in Lawrence. A senior in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, he is the son of Michael and Vibeke Pendleton, of Laurel. Christine Baumgarten and Roberta Goldenpenny, both residents of Laurel, were named to the dean's list for the fall semester at Notre Dame of Maryland University, in Baltimore. Mital Patel, of Laurel, was named to the dean's list for the fall semester at University of the Science, in Philadelphia, Pa. She is a pharmacology and toxicology student.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
An 18-year-old Rockville man was one of four college students killed in a plane crash in Ohio Monday night, police said. Abraham Pishevar, a Georgetown Preparatory School graduate and freshman at Case Western Reserve University, died in the crash at about 10 p.m., shortly after takeoff at Cuyahoga County Regional Airport, according to the Ohio Highway Patrol. The other three men aboard the small Cessna aircraft were also Case Western students - William Felten, 20, of Saginaw, Mich.; Lucas Marcelli, 20, of Massillon, Ohio; and John Hill, 18, of St. Simons, Ga., the university said.
FEATURES
By Eric Meany, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2013
When Rose and Apollos Ihedigbo moved their young family to the United States from Nigeria in 1980, they were determined to pursue opportunities in higher education that had not been available to them in their native land. The road was not easy, but through persistence and hard work Rose and Apollos each earned doctoral degrees from the University of Massachusetts. Along the way they strove to teach their children the value of a good education as well as the harsh reality that not all those who desire to learn possess the resources to pay for schooling.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2012
Jonathan Jayes-Green graduated near the top of his high school class but couldn't afford to attend the four-year colleges that accepted him. Now he's an honor student at two-year Montgomery College, and he'd like to head off cuts to the school's budget. The second-year student from Silver Spring was one of hundreds from Maryland's community and independent colleges rallied in Annapolis and lobbied legislators Thursday to avert cuts in Gov. Martin O'Malley's proposed higher education spending.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose | June 7, 2011
Most of us might feel overwhelmed owing tens of thousands of dollars. Not college students. A study by Ohio State University, found that young adults not only see debt as positive, but being in hock boosted their self-esteem. The more credit card and college loan debt they held, the “higher their self-esteem and the more they felt like they were in control of their lives,” according to a release about the study. These feelings were more pronounced among students from low-income families, the study found.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2013
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, like arts groups everywhere, wants to draw in a younger crowd. This season, the BSO is making it even easier for college students to get in on the action -- a new product called "BSO Student Select. " For a one-time payment of $25, students can attend as many concerts as they like during the whole 2013-14 season. (The Detroit Symphony had success with this kind of product a few seasons ago.) A few "premium events" are excluded, but orchestra officials say that still leaves about 90 percent of the scheduled concerts.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | June 4, 2012
One more reason why the Consumer Financial Protection Bureauneeds to look at prepaid debit cards: College students are finding their scarce dollars eaten up by fees on the cards, which many schools are using for student IDs and to disburse financial aid, according to a new study by U.S. Public Interest Research Group. PIRG says information about the contracts between colleges and the financial institutions that provide the cards to students isn't widely available, but at least one school struck a deal worth millions to the college.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2014
At the Target in Baltimore's Mondawmin Mall, megaphone-shaped "college" signs hang over aisles stocked with must-haves for students living on their own, such as mini-refrigerators, desk lamps and six-packs of ramen noodles. "Back to College" is a well-stocked department at Target and many other stores this time of year. It's no wonder. The college market represents the biggest chunk of back-to-school shopping, which itself is the second-biggest season for retailers after the holiday season.
NEWS
By Richard S. Madaleno Jr | August 4, 2014
Excessive drinking among college students is a public health problem that is larger than just the colleges and universities. It is a problem for our entire state. The more than 270,000 students attending college in Maryland comprise a large and critical segment of our future workforce. This is why I was proud to work with the leadership and staff of the Maryland Collaborative to Reduce College Drinking and Related Problems this legislative session to ban the sale of extreme-strength "grain" alcohol.
NEWS
July 16, 2014
It is unbelievable that the cream of the crop of our youth, university graduates who have completed 18 years of education, do not know how to safely cross a highway, a skill I learned in second grade ( "University of Maryland, city officials urge pedestrian safety on U.S. 1," July 7). If irresponsible people make irresponsible decisions, who bears the responsibility for the consequences? To place the burden on Maryland taxpayers is irresponsible and wrong. Bill Garrison - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
— Christen McWithey is sitting in front of a 3-D printer the size of a microwave, figuring out how to turn computer graphics into model satellites and telescopes to support a NASA mission. Christen McWithey is 19 years old. McWithey, who just completed her freshman year at the University of Maryland, College Park, said she's "blown away" by the opportunities she's had as an intern at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. She's producing the models to help engineers and scientists visualize the creation of a satellite they're working to launch in eight years.
NEWS
By Peter Morici | June 16, 2014
Despite five years of economic recovery, college graduates continue to face a tough job market. Certainly young people should take responsibility for their lives, but parents, educators and politicians all share some blame for their troubles. College graduates earn much higher wages and are less likely to be unemployed than high school graduates - and those gaps are increasing. Still many recent graduates cannot earn enough to live independently, and they often end up in jobs that don't require a college education.
FEATURES
By Donna M. Owens, For The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
After a busy first semester last year at Boston University, Hayley Spivey was eager to head home to Florida for spring break. Yet while the theater arts major enjoyed the sun and fun, she also found herself slightly bored. "It was nice seeing my family and friends," recalled Spivey, 19. "But other than relaxing, I didn't do much else. " This year, however, the sophomore was in Maryland for her school break, taking part in a movement that's swept college campuses nationwide. Known as Alternative Spring Break, the concept, which gained popularity in the 1980s and 1990s, centers around students performing community service during their time off, instead of, say, participating in wild parties or beach escapes.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2014
As a government and politics major at the University of Maryland, Joe Chapman knew he might end up working for the federal government. "It was not always at the top of my list for a career, but it was among the places that I knew I was going to shoot for," the Bowie man said. Chapman said plenty of students at the university, on the edge of the nation's capital and a Metro ride away from many of its federal agencies, felt the same way. But now, as a 26-year-old program analyst for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Chapman said he is "one of a very few 20-somethings" in his office.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2014
The University of Baltimore will offer free tuition to college students in their final semester if they can finish their degrees in four years, the school announced Tuesday. The unusual break could boost the college's flagging graduation rates and reduce student debt loads. Dubbed "Finish4Free," the deal is to be offered to this fall's freshmen when they reach their senior year, school officials said. They were unsure how much it would cost the university. In-state students now pay about $3,300 in tuition each semester; out-of-state students pay $9,000.
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