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SPORTS
September 24, 2012
                                          Find more information on Baltimore-area college sports at these links: Coppin State University Loyola University of Maryland Morgan State University Stevenson University Towson University UMBC
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. plans to launch a college sports network to be broadcast on television stations it owns, the Hunt Valley-based company said Thursday. The American Sports Network, or ASN, will show live events, including football, basketball, soccer and other sports, from more than 50 colleges and universities. The network will launch at the start of the college football season this year. Sinclair said it has secured rights agreements with several NCAA Division I conferences, including Conference USA, the Colonial Athletic Association, the Big South Conference, the Southern Conference and the Patriot League.
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SPORTS
July 23, 2010
It starts at the top Joseph Schwerdt Sun Sentinel First of all, Nick Saban questioning the integrity of sports agent rings hollow in South Florida, where four years ago he stared stone-faced at the Miami Dolphins' fan base and flatly said: "I'm not gonna be the Alabama coach." Right. But we digress. Who has ruined college sports? Agents. Coaches. Athletic directors. School presidents. Boosters. Networks. And others. Slice up the blame pie and give each an equal piece.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2014
Under Armour CEO Kevin Plank is far from alone in believing the relatively young Baltimore-based company has a shot at becoming the world's biggest sports brand. Among nearly 200 shareholders who crowded into the company's Locust Point headquarters for its annual meeting Tuesday were more than a few who shared the founder's enthusiasm. "The important thing about this company is one word: 'innovative,'" said Frank Altoz, a shareholder from Catonsville. "As long as they keep doing that, the stock will be going up. " Shares of Under Armour have soared 65 percent in the past year.
NEWS
September 23, 2013
If University of Maryland Athletic Director Kevin Anderson happened to pick up Time magazine's Sept. 16th issue, he must have choked on his coffee. The cover story, "It's Time to Pay College Athletes," represented a huge leap forward for the movement to professionalize big-time college football and men's basketball programs, and that's bad news for the University of Maryland and many other schools like it. Should this come to pass, Maryland will find itself on the bottom floor of a two-tiered caste system with no means of improving its lot. "What's wrong with a top football player receiving an extra $50,000 a year?"
SPORTS
By Ed Sherman and Ed Sherman,Chicago Tribune | December 9, 1990
CHICAGO -- Lou Holtz wrote a book. So did Bo Schembechler and Barry Switzer.All of those books became best sellers, which says something about America's fascination with college sports.Murray Sperber also wrote a book about college sports, which was released this fall. It hasn't become a best seller, and that's too bad.It seems the public would rather read stories about Holtz's motivational methods or Schembechler's relationship with Woody Hayes. Switzer's book, "Bootlegger's Boy," is worth reading if only for sections on his wild and turbulent upbringing.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | March 19, 1991
Give PBS points for timeliness in airing "Sports for Sale" tonight -- smack in the middle of "March Madness," NCAA basketball tournament time."Sports for Sale" is a 90-minute documentary with Bill Moyers about the madness, badness and business of college sports and what Moyers calls the "myth of the student-athlete." It airs at 9 on MPT (Channels 22 and 67).The report says some things that have needed to be said for a long time.Moyers asks, for example, what kind of message ABC and ESPN are sending students with the case of basketball coach Jim Valvano.
NEWS
By D. STANLEY EITZEN | March 17, 1991
The "March madness" surrounding the National Collegiate Athletic Association men's basketball tournament reminds us that college sport, whether we like it or not, is commercial entertainment.The NCAA recently signed a $1 billion contract with CBS for the rights to the men's basketball tournament through 1997. If a football team is selected for the Rose Bowl, it receives $6 million, which is shared with other league members. The most successful schools approach $20 million budgets for their sports programs.
NEWS
By Kelly Richmond and Kelly Richmond,States News Service | June 19, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A congressional agency will turn the tables on the NCAA by making the powerful sports organization the subject of an investigation, it was announced today.The National Collegiate Athletic Association, the major governing body in college sports, is widely known for the investigations it conducts into alleged misconduct by member schools.The General Accounting Office -- an independent, investigative arm of Congress -- has agreed to probe the finances of college sports, said Rep. Tom McMillen of Maryland.
SPORTS
By Bob Dart and Bob Dart,Cox News Service | March 7, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A report on college sports released yesterday shows that coaches are stubbornly resisting reforms that most Americans and almost all of the academic community believe are desperately needed."
NEWS
By Dr. Dennis Golladay | May 9, 2014
Harford Community College President Dennis Golladay sat down with two editors and a reporter from The Aegis earlier this week and talked about the college's finances and the controversy over fee increase at the Harford Sports Complex. He also provided the following essay about those issues. Over the past few weeks, readers of The Aegis have seen several articles and editorials regarding rental rates for the summer use of athletic fields at Harford Community College and an increase in the College's tuition and fees.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2014
Student-athletes around the nation will officially commit to play college sports on Wednesday, when they sign National Letters of Intent for football, field hockey, soccer, track and field and cross country. If you're attending a signing ceremony, send photos to high school sports editor Alexander Pyles at apyles@baltsun.com , and we'll publish them in our signing day photo gallery. In the meantime, you can browse photos of local student-athletes expected to sign their letters on Wednesday.
NEWS
By Tamieka Briscoe, Capital News Service | January 29, 2014
Columbia resident Darryl Hill, the first African-American man to play collegiate football in the Atlantic Coast Conference, received a standing ovation Tuesday when he was honored by the Maryland General Assembly. House Speaker Michael E. Busch likened Hill, who began playing football for the University of Maryland in 1963, to another African-American sports pioneer.. "Darryl Hill is to Southern college football what Jackie Robinson is to baseball," Busch said. The lawmakers' joint resolution honored Hill, 70, for not only integrating ACC college sports 50 years ago, but for his Howard County-based efforts to tackle economic barriers that prevent Maryland youth from participating in organized sports.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2013
Kenny Tate's college football career enabled him to fulfill a dream, while all but ending another dream -- that of an NFL career. It doesn't seem like a favorable tradeoff.  Tate and countless other  top pro prospects  played college football for free, became injured and -- in their diminished states -- missed out on opportunities  to cash in on their talents  in the NFL. Make no mistake. Tate got what he wanted from the University of Maryland. The former All-ACC safety got to play on a big stage in which he could showcase his ample talents.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | October 23, 2013
Et cetera Lacrosse is fastest-growing college sport, NCAA says Lacrosse grew faster at the college level than any other sport in 2012-13, the NCAA said in its annual participation report released Tuesday. The sport with the highest numbers of men's teams added in 2012-13 was lacrosse, with 26 new programs. Indoor track and field added 23 programs, and cross country added 17 programs. For women's teams, lacrosse also topped the list with 40 teams added, followed by golf with 30 teams added, and indoor track and field with 27 teams added.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2013
When Sherrod Hawkes transferred to Patterson from Overlea last fall, he didn't have much interest in studying. He just wanted to play football. The powerful downhill ball carrier wanted to play in college, but after two years of high school, his grade point average was 0.77 on a 4.0 scale. Hawkes, who had not realized his football career would soon end if he didn't hit the books, found out how much ground he had to make up when he met Patterson's academic coach, Kelley Bagdasarian.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | May 22, 1991
Almost daily since the Knight Commission Report on Intercollegiate Athletics shone like a beacon in the daylight a couple of months ago, stories of the continuing corruption on campus have flowed unabated.The results of special admission surveys benefiting the athlete in outrageous fashion have combined with tales of interest-free loans to the perspiring artists, lousy graduation rates, the usual assortment of police-blotter indiscretions and the bi-weekly announcements of the NCAA looking into yet another aspect of the way business is conducted at Nevada-Las Vegas.
SPORTS
By Mark Hyman Ray Frager of The Sun's sports staff contributed to this article | July 26, 1991
For years, Representative Tom McMillen has been assailing college sports for ignoring the needs of college athletes. Now, he's proposing to do something about it.McMillen, D-Maryland, yesterday introduced legislation in the Congress that would streamline the way the National Collegiate Athletic Association adopts rules and might radically redistribute the riches generated each year by college games.In the bill, titled the "College Athletic Reform Act," McMillen calls for creation of a Board of Presidents, a 33-member panel of college heads who would have broad powers to alter the rules and relatively little concern about their initiatives being reversed.
NEWS
September 23, 2013
If University of Maryland Athletic Director Kevin Anderson happened to pick up Time magazine's Sept. 16th issue, he must have choked on his coffee. The cover story, "It's Time to Pay College Athletes," represented a huge leap forward for the movement to professionalize big-time college football and men's basketball programs, and that's bad news for the University of Maryland and many other schools like it. Should this come to pass, Maryland will find itself on the bottom floor of a two-tiered caste system with no means of improving its lot. "What's wrong with a top football player receiving an extra $50,000 a year?"
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2013
The NCAA is grappling with how to treat college athletes' use of marijuana - a popular drug that presents a puzzle because it is considered unsafe by the U.S. government but is not a performance enhancer and has been decriminalized by a number of states. Studies and anecdotal evidence show that marijuana use has risen among college athletes - and other young Americans - in recent years as the drug has become more publicly accepted. In particular, the NCAA's chief medical officer, Brian Hainline, has expressed concern about a perceived steep rise in the popularity of synthetic marijuana, a combination of natural herbs and synthetic chemicals.
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