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NEWS
February 13, 2005
Carroll County students attending Virginia Tech were named to the dean's list for the fall semester. To qualify for the dean's list, students must attempt at least 12 credit hours graded on the A-F option and earn a 3.4 grade point average. Students on the dean's list are: Marriottsville: Scott M. Culler, a freshman majoring in business in the Pamplin College of Business; Robert J. Law, a senior majoring in mechanical engineering in the College of Engineering; Kristin E. Schields, a sophomore majoring in marketing management in the Pamplin College of Business.
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TRAVEL
By Los Angeles Times | October 5, 2008
I traveled to the United States from Frankfurt, Germany, in May. I've been on the same flight before, so I knew to be prepared with a sweater. Now, I'm sensitive to the cold, so this time I also brought along a thermometer. It was 51 degrees Fahrenheit (although sometimes it inched up to 53). Many of the passengers were wearing heavy jackets, and people were coughing. Why would they keep it so cold? One possible answer: because they don't know it's that cold. Remember that, as a passenger, you are in someone's workplace, and it's not yours.
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NEWS
July 12, 1994
Sharing your success with your alma mater is ingrained in American higher education. But until recently, the University of Maryland hadn't been a big winner. Now it has.To mark the 100th anniversary of UM's College of Engineering, builder A. James Clark is giving his old school $15 million. That's UM's largest gift ever. Within construction circles, Mr. Clark's empire is a behemoth. His company's revenues last year topped $1.1 billion. His best-known local project: Oriole Park at Camden Yards.
NEWS
By BILL FREE | April 1, 2007
A senior right-handed pitcher, Katie Boyce, is a two-time captain of the Bel Air softball team. She is described by her coach, Emily Schneck, as a dedicated, hard-working team player. When Boyce isn't on the mound, she plays first base. Boyce has also been on the school's volleyball team four years and has a 4.4 weighted grade point average. What do you want to accomplish this season? I'm hoping to improve on my skills as a pitcher and be more effective. I want to improve my big pitches, like the rise ball, which is my out pitch.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 13, 2004
Severino L. "Bino" Koh, a founder and associate dean of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County College of Engineering, died Thursday of complications from heart surgery at Washington Hospital Center. The Columbia resident was 77. "His leadership was significant because it reflected both his great enthusiasm and humanity," UMBC President Freeman A. Hrabowski III said of Dr. Koh, who was the College of Engineering's chief academic administrator from 1985 to 1991 and professor of mechanical engineering until his retirement in 2002.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | June 9, 1993
COLLEGE PARK -- It still had some rough edges. Its turn signals and lights weren't installed yet. And a few parts were held together with tape.But with just 12 days to go before they're supposed to race it across the Midwest, University of Maryland College of Engineering students decided to roll out their new solar-powered car for university officials and the media here yesterday -- even if it wasn't quite finished.The vehicle, called "The Pride of Maryland II," is one of 36 solar cars entered in the U.S. Department of Energy's "Sunrayce 1993," a seven-day -- from Arlington, Texas, to Minneapolis scheduled to begin June 20. Colleges and universities from 20 states, Canada and Puerto Rico are competing in this year's event, which is intended to promote solar car technology.
NEWS
July 22, 1992
The gift of $100 million to Glassboro State College to create a college of engineering in southern New Jersey is a model of public-private partnership for economic development and of private fund solicitation by state institutions. It is also a bonanza for one small school of limited fame.Henry M. Rowan, chairman-founder of Inductotherm, Inc., a high-tech manufacturer of Rancocas, N.J., and his wife Betty, have pledged to give $100 million over 10 years. In return, the school in the town of Glassboro, 20 miles southeast of Philadelphia and beyond its suburbs, has been renamed Rowan College of New Jersey.
NEWS
By Patricia Meisol | November 13, 1990
Some people frighten their fellow passengers on roller coaster rides by screaming. In line at an amusement park this summer, Andrea Bartoletti did it by talking about whether the coaster's beams could hold the stress.A senior mechanical engineering major at the University of Maryland College Park, where 17 percent of her classmates are women, Ms. Bartoletti has jumped through an extra set of hoops to be able to assess the structure of bridges.For starters, she came to college without the requisite physics and calculus because her all-girls high school didn't offer them.
NEWS
By Patricia Meisol and Keith Paul and Patricia Meisol and Keith Paul,Sun Staff Correspondents | November 15, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Students from the University of Maryland at College Park moved their campaign to halt budget cuts from the ivory tower to the real world yesterday in a small but spirited rally at the State House.State police estimated between 400 and 500 people took part in the rally and "study-in" that began with a caravan of six honking buses and about 100 cars that left the campus about 1 p.m. Organizers had hoped for at least 1,000 people, and blamed the lower turnout on a warning from the university president, William E. Kirwan, that faculty members who cut classes would be penalized.
NEWS
By BILL FREE | April 1, 2007
A senior right-handed pitcher, Katie Boyce, is a two-time captain of the Bel Air softball team. She is described by her coach, Emily Schneck, as a dedicated, hard-working team player. When Boyce isn't on the mound, she plays first base. Boyce has also been on the school's volleyball team four years and has a 4.4 weighted grade point average. What do you want to accomplish this season? I'm hoping to improve on my skills as a pitcher and be more effective. I want to improve my big pitches, like the rise ball, which is my out pitch.
NEWS
February 13, 2005
Carroll County students attending Virginia Tech were named to the dean's list for the fall semester. To qualify for the dean's list, students must attempt at least 12 credit hours graded on the A-F option and earn a 3.4 grade point average. Students on the dean's list are: Marriottsville: Scott M. Culler, a freshman majoring in business in the Pamplin College of Business; Robert J. Law, a senior majoring in mechanical engineering in the College of Engineering; Kristin E. Schields, a sophomore majoring in marketing management in the Pamplin College of Business.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kavita Kumar and Kavita Kumar,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 7, 2004
Professor Joe Kappock's fear of an empty classroom came half true last year when just 55 of the 90 students registered in his biochemistry class at Washington University in St. Louis showed up one day. He had worried his morning-challenged students might make a habit of sleeping in instead of attending his 9 a.m. class, because they knew a camera in the back of the room was taping everything he said. And they could watch the tape whenever they wanted by clicking on the video online. Most students still get something out of the arcane habit of attending class in person, he said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 13, 2004
Severino L. "Bino" Koh, a founder and associate dean of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County College of Engineering, died Thursday of complications from heart surgery at Washington Hospital Center. The Columbia resident was 77. "His leadership was significant because it reflected both his great enthusiasm and humanity," UMBC President Freeman A. Hrabowski III said of Dr. Koh, who was the College of Engineering's chief academic administrator from 1985 to 1991 and professor of mechanical engineering until his retirement in 2002.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | February 27, 1996
It is a tradition at the Diamondback, the University of Maryland's student newspaper; one that angers employees, but delights advertisers eager to get their messages in the pages that are sure to be read.About this time every year, the paper publishes a 12-page supplement listing the salaries of most of the university's staff, from President William E. Kirwan's $161,200 to the $26,631 Hazel Stephenson makes as an administrative aide.Ms. Stephenson, who works in the meteorology department, is steamed.
NEWS
July 12, 1994
Sharing your success with your alma mater is ingrained in American higher education. But until recently, the University of Maryland hadn't been a big winner. Now it has.To mark the 100th anniversary of UM's College of Engineering, builder A. James Clark is giving his old school $15 million. That's UM's largest gift ever. Within construction circles, Mr. Clark's empire is a behemoth. His company's revenues last year topped $1.1 billion. His best-known local project: Oriole Park at Camden Yards.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | June 9, 1993
COLLEGE PARK -- It still had some rough edges. Its turn signals and lights weren't installed yet. And a few parts were held together with tape.But with just 12 days to go before they're supposed to race it across the Midwest, University of Maryland College of Engineering students decided to roll out their new solar-powered car for university officials and the media here yesterday -- even if it wasn't quite finished.The vehicle, called "The Pride of Maryland II," is one of 36 solar cars entered in the U.S. Department of Energy's "Sunrayce 1993," a seven-day -- from Arlington, Texas, to Minneapolis scheduled to begin June 20. Colleges and universities from 20 states, Canada and Puerto Rico are competing in this year's event, which is intended to promote solar car technology.
BUSINESS
By Carol Kleiman and Carol Kleiman,Chicago Tribune | February 10, 1992
When Eleanor Baum was in high school in New York in the 1950s, she took advanced courses in math and science."Everyone told the guys in my classes to become engineers, and everyone told me I should be an elementary school teacher -- including my guidance counselor and my mother, who said if I became an engineer, no one would marry me," said Ms. Baum, dean of the college of engineering at the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art, a tuition-free college...
TRAVEL
By Los Angeles Times | October 5, 2008
I traveled to the United States from Frankfurt, Germany, in May. I've been on the same flight before, so I knew to be prepared with a sweater. Now, I'm sensitive to the cold, so this time I also brought along a thermometer. It was 51 degrees Fahrenheit (although sometimes it inched up to 53). Many of the passengers were wearing heavy jackets, and people were coughing. Why would they keep it so cold? One possible answer: because they don't know it's that cold. Remember that, as a passenger, you are in someone's workplace, and it's not yours.
NEWS
July 22, 1992
The gift of $100 million to Glassboro State College to create a college of engineering in southern New Jersey is a model of public-private partnership for economic development and of private fund solicitation by state institutions. It is also a bonanza for one small school of limited fame.Henry M. Rowan, chairman-founder of Inductotherm, Inc., a high-tech manufacturer of Rancocas, N.J., and his wife Betty, have pledged to give $100 million over 10 years. In return, the school in the town of Glassboro, 20 miles southeast of Philadelphia and beyond its suburbs, has been renamed Rowan College of New Jersey.
BUSINESS
By Carol Kleiman and Carol Kleiman,Chicago Tribune | February 10, 1992
When Eleanor Baum was in high school in New York in the 1950s, she took advanced courses in math and science."Everyone told the guys in my classes to become engineers, and everyone told me I should be an elementary school teacher -- including my guidance counselor and my mother, who said if I became an engineer, no one would marry me," said Ms. Baum, dean of the college of engineering at the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art, a tuition-free college...
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