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By Sloane Brown | October 7, 2001
The tent set up on Mount Royal Avenue contained an H.G. Wells kind of universe, one where his time-travel machine had gone nuts. Marie Antoinette was mingling with '60s flower children. Civil War Southern belles rubbed shoulders with zoot-suited hipsters. Bobby-soxers, Wild West cowboys, and hippies danced to the tunes of a swing band. This "Fete of Lights 2001" celebrated the Maryland Institute College of Art's 175th anniversary, so guests were asked to dress in costumes from any of those 175 years.
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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2013
The old arched red wooden door to the Seventh Metro Church is less that two blocks from the modern glass-and-steel panel that floats in front of the Maryland Institute College of Art 's newest exhibition space. They bring to mind two different eras and seem designed to be used by two dissimilar groups of people: spiky-haired artists and church ladies wearing fancy hats. But when a white art student in her 20s met a middle-aged African-American pastor, they discovered that both doors opened into sacred spaces where people look for answers to the same big questions.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | October 12, 1993
A little change has made a big difference to this year's faculty exhibit at the Maryland Institute, College of Art. In previous years, each eligible faculty member had a 6-foot wall space limit and could put in as many works as would fit that limit. This year, the limit was changed to one work per artist. The result is that the jumble of former years (if memory serves me) has given way to a cleaner look in which individual works stand out and theshow as a whole leaves a much stronger impression.
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December 15, 2011
Shawn Horsey and Hillary McCarthy , both of Columbia, have been named to the dean's list for the fall 2011 quarter at the Savannah College of Art and Design, in Savannah, Ga. Sarah Thorne , a senior from Columbia, completed two internships this summer while holding down a summer job, working as a petting farm manager at Clark's Elioak Farm. Her internships were with the USDA Veterinary Services and at the National Aquarium, in Baltimore, as an Aviculturist at the Australia exhibit.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF Sun staff librarian Paul McCardell provided research assistance for this article | October 1, 1998
Julian Allen, an internationally renowned illustrator whose work appeared regularly in major publications, died Monday of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma at Stella Maris Hospice.Mr. Allen, who was 55 and lived in Bolton Hill, had been chairman of the illustration department at Maryland Institute, College of Art since 1996. Earlier, he had taught editorial illustration for more than 20 years at Parson's School of Design in New York.Mr. Allen brought to a high art his graphic reconstruction of such events as the Watergate burglars at work and the Israeli commando attack on the Entebbe Airport in Uganda, through the medium of oils, watercolors and ink.His work appeared in the New York Times, Rolling Stone, the New Yorker, Time, Newsweek and Esquire.
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By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,sun reporter | September 20, 2006
The National Symphony Orchestra performed a concert of video-game music last month at Wolf Trap in Virginia. Madden NFL 07 grossed more than $100 million in the sports video game's first week -- rivaling the initial ticket sales for The Da Vinci Code. Open Newsweek and read all about the World of Warcraft, a game your son or husband might know all too well. The video game phenomenon, an $8.4 billion industry, was just an art show waiting to happen. If you go Big Huge Games: From Concept to Game runs through Oct. 8 at the Rosenberg Gallery, Brown Center, Maryland Institute College of Art. Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday.
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By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | August 29, 2001
Consider the comma. At first glance, it might seem insignificant - a period with a tail, a raindrop in the wind, respected only by grammarians. But the guardians of Baltimore's most prestigious art school think otherwise. The comma, they say, can loom very large, creating divisions where none exist, acting as a Berlin Wall of punctuation. Which is why, after a year of deliberation, the Maryland Institute, College of Art is casting the comma aside. As the fall semester kicked off this week, the word came down to returning professors and students: Henceforth, the art school in Bolton Hill will be the Maryland Institute College of Art - no comma, no pause, no division.
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By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2004
Madiz Gomez had a painting, a paper and an animation project to finish by today, the last day of classes at Maryland Institute College of Art. She also was practically broke. So when three people from MICA's Office of Student Affairs stopped by late at night with baskets of snacks and tangerines, Gomez gratefully accepted some chips and fruit. "Just what I need," she said. Welcome to the frenetic world of finals, where students engage in the tradition of skipping sustenance, sleep and showers while frantically trying to get projects done and kicking themselves for not starting earlier.
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By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2005
In case anyone thought art school students lack a practical sense of direction, Carole Schlein, newly minted graduate of the Maryland Institute College of Art, told hundreds of people in her commencement remarks yesterday at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall that she has a plan. "I plan to spend a big chunk of time in front of the TV watching reruns of Golden Girls, gaining 10 pounds," said Schlein, 22. She said the plan would involve Doritos and went on to share several other details of her life as a MICA student: Her toilet often overflowed.
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By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | November 16, 2008
Her bold canvases made her a bright star in the 1950s New York art world, but she "sank from view faster than the Titanic" when she moved to Baltimore, The New York Times said. Grace Hartigan, who ultimately found a second career offering her wisdom and advice to generations of young painters at the Maryland Institute College of Art, died of liver failure yesterday at the Lorien Mays Chapel nursing home. She was 86. "I feel that I am an aristocrat as far as painting is concerned; I believe in beautiful drawing, in elegance, in luminous color and light," she said in a 1990 biography.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 20, 2010
William J. Evitts, a noted writer, editor and historian who was a former college professor, died Dec. 14 of pancreatic cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care. He was 68. The son of a U.S. Department of Labor official and a homemaker, Dr. Evitts was born in Chicago and raised in Arlington, Va., where he graduated from Washington and Lee High School. He earned his bachelor's degree in 1964 from the Johns Hopkins University and was a Thomas Jefferson Fellow at the University of Virginia, where he earned a master's degree in 1966.
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By TIM SMITH | June 23, 2009
The Baltimore Choral Arts Society's 2009-2010 season will sample various musical styles, from a classically proportioned Schubert Mass to the premiere of a gospel-influenced work by African-American composer Rosephanye Dunn Powell. Popular American songs will be showcased in the season-opener Nov. 1 at Goucher College's Kraushaar Auditorium, when New York-based cabaret singer Eric Comstock joins the chorus and its music director, Tom Hall. Choral Arts commissioned the new work by Powell, a prolific choral composer who teaches at Alabama's Auburn University.
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By sloane brown and sloane brown,sloane@sloanebrown.com | February 8, 2009
When it comes to singing the praises of someone, there was a full symphony in honor of Fred Lazarus, courtesy of some 200 friends and supporters. They had gathered at the Tide Point offices of Ayers/Saint/Gross to surprise Lazarus and celebrate his 30 years as president of Maryland Institute College of Art. "First of all, he's a genius. And second of all, he re-invents himself every five years. He's brought all these great innovative ideas into how art is taught," explained MICA board chair Fredye Gross, who was co-host for the party with husband Adam Gross.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | November 21, 2008
Hazel T. Barrett, a retired educator and collector of African-American art who also had owned and operated a Baltimore art gallery for a decade, died Mondayof complications from Parkinson's disease at Keswick Multi-Care Center. She was 90. Hazel Thompson, the daughter of scrap yard owner, was born and raised in Somerset, Pa. After graduating from Somerset High School in 1936, she enrolled at what is now Morgan State University, where she earned a bachelor's degree in education in 1940.
NEWS
November 18, 2008
Grace Hartigan, the renowned artist and educator who died over the weekend at the age of 86, was a painter's painter. "The thing that's been incredible is that one way or another, I've been able to arrange my life so that I could paint every day," she told The Sun in a 2001 interview. "I have great plans to live as long as Georgia O'Keeffe," she added. Ms. O'Keeffe lived to 98, and Ms. Hartigan said she needed the time because "there's a lot of work I still want to do." Ms. Hartigan was not granted that wish, but what she accomplished over a career spanning more than six decades was little short of astonishing.
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By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | November 16, 2008
Her bold canvases made her a bright star in the 1950s New York art world, but she "sank from view faster than the Titanic" when she moved to Baltimore, The New York Times said. Grace Hartigan, who ultimately found a second career offering her wisdom and advice to generations of young painters at the Maryland Institute College of Art, died of liver failure yesterday at the Lorien Mays Chapel nursing home. She was 86. "I feel that I am an aristocrat as far as painting is concerned; I believe in beautiful drawing, in elegance, in luminous color and light," she said in a 1990 biography.
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By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN ARTS WRITER | November 10, 2001
The man whose lyrics formed the philosophical backbone of my grad school experience, who was lead singer and muse for the '80s rock band Talking Heads, who has recorded myriad solo albums, written books, created a stream of videos, presented photography exhibitions, composed the music for a Twyla Tharp dance, shared an Oscar for the score of Bernardo Bertolucci's The Last Emperor, is - right now - trying to unscrew a lightbulb. David Byrne is midway up a ladder at the Maryland Institute College of Art. He's putting the finishing touches on an exhibit featuring his photography and a new visual-and-audio installation.
NEWS
By Ed Gunts | September 19, 2008
The Maryland Institute College of Art will hold the world premiere of a 36-minute documentary about Maryland artist and educator Grace Hartigan at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow at the Brown Center, 1301 Mount Royal Ave. Grace Hartigan - Shattering Boundaries, features studio interviews with Hartigan, the director of MICA's Hoffberger School of Painting since 1965, and artists she has influenced over the years. The reservations-only event includes a question-and-answer session with co-producers Janice Stanton and Alice Shure of Amici Films, as well as a reception.
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