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By Thomas Belton | March 3, 2002
HADDONFIELD, N.J. - My family has just weathered the most stressful four months of our lives. No, not buying a house or getting a loved one through a serious illness. I'm talking about real stress - finding a college for my son. And the biggest stress was getting him to take it seriously. As we traveled around, looking for the perfect learning environment, I had trouble connecting with him on my own college experience. From the looks he threw me, I realized that I might as well have gone to school on Mars compared to what he expects.
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ENTERTAINMENT
Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
If you are one of the 1.2 million viewers the Comedy Central series "Broad City" attracts on average each week, you might have noticed a nod to Baltimore in the recent episode "Stolen Phone. " When a distraught Ilana - one of the show's two protagonists - bangs on the door of her phoneless best friend's New York City apartment after a panicked search, Abbi calmly greets her in a black-and-teal Maryland Institute College of Art sweatshirt. No, it was not a thrift shop find or a random hoodie selected by the wardrobe department.
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FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | January 19, 1993
"Class of '96" is the class act of the youth ensemble drama field. It's a gentle, wise and funny look at the passage from home to college life. It's the "thirtysomething" for twentysomethings.The series, which premieres at 8 tonight on WBFF (Channel 45), was pulled from the fall schedule when financial considerations led Fox to delay its expansion into Tuesday nights until this week. It is a series worth waiting for.The setting is Havenhurst College, a fictional Ivy League school. The main players are seven freshmen -- four men and three women.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tionah Lee | July 10, 2013
It all started with a bad dream, and a scream. Things are shaking up as Hanna puts her best investigative foot forward to prove that her mother may (or may not) be linked to the murder of Detective Wilden. After dreaming of her mother bald and wearing a prison jumper, Hanna feels that the secrets are enough, and should look for her own clues. “Mom, I am not a sofa.” Mrs. Hastings isn't too keen on the idea that Spencer won't be going to UPenn, and is using the current moment to reposition Spencer's college life.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to The Sun | May 6, 2007
Anne Arundel Community College officials had one directive for Kim Hunter before she started teaching Psychology 101 this semester to a group of Severna Park Middle School eighth-graders: Don't water down any of the tests or the homework assignments. Hunter didn't, and she has been surprised at the results. The 13 handpicked students do their homework, learn the material and are enthusiastic during classroom discussions. All of them have held onto their honor-roll status, despite the addition of an after-school class.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2003
Tyrelle Johnson is only 10 years old, but his grandmother Theresa Thompson packed up his little suitcase this weekend and sent him off to college. She wasn't too worried about him, though. His elementary school principal went with him - and he'll be back next week. Tyrelle and nine other children from Brehms Lane Elementary School started today as very pre-undergraduates at Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine, in a weeklong program to introduce the ambitious fourth- and fifth-graders to college life.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2002
There's no question in Christian Sullivan's mind what is his favorite class in his first semester at college. It's University 101 - the class that's all about, well, how to be a student in the first semester in college. Sullivan, a freshman from Columbia at the University of Maryland, College Park, is having trouble in his English course and is unsure about his major. But when he comes to University 101, a required course for many freshmen, things seem to clear up. The class has taught him how to manage his time, how to approach professors and, in general, how to survive life as a college rookie.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 12, 2006
When executives from the WB started thinking about a new student drama that would mirror the lives of their 12- to 34-year-old audience, they bypassed the traditional standby, high school. So did the creators of Oxygen's new comedy Campus Ladies, who sought a setting for adults who dream of recapturing their youth. And at Black Entertainment Television, where the top-rated show follows the lives of eight university students, executives are keenly aware that college is fast becoming TV's new high school.
FEATURES
By Alessandra Soler and Alessandra Soler,Knight-Ridder News Service | October 26, 1993
College life overwhelmed Martin Spethman. Too many classes, too many parties, not enough studying.So the Key Biscayne, Fla., resident put together his own $11 college survival guide, an MTV look at "real" college life and how to deal with it.Mr. Spethman calls his 184-page book "How to Get Into and Graduate from College in Four Years with Good Grades, a Useful Major, a Lot of Knowledge, a Little Debt, Great Friends, Happy Parents, Maximum Party Attendance, Minimal Weight Gain, Decent Habits, Fewer Hassles, a Career Goal, and a Super Attitude, All While Remaining Extremely Cool!"
ENTERTAINMENT
By Amanda Smear and Amanda Smear,Sun Staff | August 31, 2003
As rapper-turned-actor Will Smith so aptly noted: "Parents just don't understand." High school seniors are notoriously secretive about their lives, yet berate their parents for being "clueless" and having "no idea what it's like" to be a teen. I know, I was thinking that myself not so long ago. In Freshman Diaries, Showtime's 10-part series which begins tonight, filmmaker R.J. Cutler attempts to get inside the crazy lives and heads of 12 freshmen attending the University of Texas at Austin.
ENTERTAINMENT
By L'Oreal Thompson, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2013
In case you couldn't tell by the title, this episode is about dreams - Finn's dream of becoming a teacher (yes, that Finn); Rachel landing a role on Broadway; and Marley becoming a singer-songwriter, much like Taylor Swift, but not nearly as annoying. So we start with Finn in college, at Miami University to be exact. And then we experience not one, but three Harlem shakes. It never gets old! So Finn's loving the college life and finds Puck, who isn't actually enrolled in classes, but he's just there anyway.
EXPLORE
Editorial from The Aegis | March 19, 2013
Alcohol consumption has a long and storied association with college life, much of it not good. The degree to which that association is promoted at Harford Community College is a matter of substantial public concern. Though the discussions are very preliminary, there's talk of asking the local delegation to the Maryland General Assembly to establish a special class of liquor license that would be appropriate for the new APGFCU Arena on campus at HCC. The arena is the largest public venue in Harford County, with seating for in excess of 3,000 people, depending on the type of event.
NEWS
August 1, 2012
The Sun suggests that the buck stops at Coppin State University President Reginald Avery's door regarding efforts to improve student retention and graduation rates and point the school in a new direction ("Which way for Coppin?" July 25). But whatever one's view of President Avery's leadership, to limit the discussion of Coppin's current plight to the four years of his tenure misses the boat. Mr. Avery's four-year record, faculty, staff and student sentiments and his testimony on behalf of the Coalition for Equity and Excellence, which represents the state's historically black colleges and universities in their lawsuit against Maryland's Higher Education Commission, provide an ample basis for an objective assessment of Coppin's problems.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2011
Retired economist S. Ramachandran recently spoke at St. John's College in Annapolis about money's "magical qualities," how it often creates illusions that surprise and misguide. Before that, faculty member Joseph Cohen invited his audience to consider how old the human race is and when people started thinking. The discussions are part of an annual summer lecture series at the college called "Life of the Mind," an offshoot of St. John's eclectic approach to scholarship where all students study Western classics with no majors and no departments.
ENTERTAINMENT
By kevin cowherd and kevin cowherd,kevin.cowherd@baltsun.com | November 16, 2008
This fall, my wife and I are busy trying to find the right college for our youngest son, the high school senior, who does not seem quite as engaged in the process as we are. Like his older brother and sister before him, the boy has been helping us with this college search by stating that he's not sure where he wants to go to college and not sure what he wants to study. This has helped narrow the search to about 10,000 colleges, which means by the time we get through checking them all out, the boy will be 60 years old and we will be, well, dead.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Reporter | May 30, 2007
MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. -- This might be Annika Sorenstam's tournament, but the world of women's golf still seems to revolve around Michelle Wie. Because Wie was sidelined for nearly five months because of a reported wrist injury, her presence this week in the Ginn Tribute brought reporters who normally wouldn't be here outside Charleston for the new LPGA tournament officially hosted by Sorenstam, herself coming back from injury after a two-month layoff....
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | November 20, 1995
COLLEGE PARK -- Terrell Stokes battled a back ailment, a state of depression and the typical transition from high school to college life to get here.Tonight, he makes his much-anticipated debut for Maryland in an 8 o'clock exhibition game against the Brisbane Bullets of Australia at Cole Field House.Rated the nation's No. 1 pure point guard at Simon Gratz High in Philadelphia a year ago, Stokes missed four weeks of preseason practice with a nagging lower back problem that appears finally to have been alleviated.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | November 9, 2001
COLLEGE PARK - How long has Aaron Thompson been at Maryland? "Sixteen years," the senior linebacker said, meaning he would have been 7 years old when he first enrolled here. Sometimes, it feels like it really has been 16 years instead of four and change for Thompson, who will play his final home football game tomorrow night against Clemson. Everything seems to have come too fast for Thompson - the shamble with which he moves across campus, the "Grandpa" moniker teammates have stuck him with at the ripe age of 23. "I feel old," said Thompson, a Mount St. Joseph graduate and 42-game starter who has 51 tackles this season.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to The Sun | May 6, 2007
Anne Arundel Community College officials had one directive for Kim Hunter before she started teaching Psychology 101 this semester to a group of Severna Park Middle School eighth-graders: Don't water down any of the tests or the homework assignments. Hunter didn't, and she has been surprised at the results. The 13 handpicked students do their homework, learn the material and are enthusiastic during classroom discussions. All of them have held onto their honor-roll status, despite the addition of an after-school class.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 12, 2006
When executives from the WB started thinking about a new student drama that would mirror the lives of their 12- to 34-year-old audience, they bypassed the traditional standby, high school. So did the creators of Oxygen's new comedy Campus Ladies, who sought a setting for adults who dream of recapturing their youth. And at Black Entertainment Television, where the top-rated show follows the lives of eight university students, executives are keenly aware that college is fast becoming TV's new high school.
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