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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2011
Heather Prosser will have more than a college degree when she accepts her diploma from Stevenson University on Friday. By then, Prosser also will have the first week of her first job under her belt. A computer information systems major, Prosser had two job offers before she graduated — one from Lockheed Martin and another from Johns Hopkins HealthCare. She went with Lockheed Martin, where she began work on Monday as a software engineer. Landing a job in the post-recession — but still rocky — economy was a big relief.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
Jasmine White was accepted to Morgan State University, her dream college, almost 10 years ago. But the New Yorker discovered she could not afford the out-of-state tuition. "I just started crying because I had no idea where I was going to get [the money] before class started," White recalled. Instead of coming to Baltimore, she earned an associate's degree at a community college in New York, and served five years in the Army Reserve. Now 26, she is finally enrolling at Morgan State this fall.
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NEWS
By Susan Reimer | May 4, 2009
As soon as our college graduates throw their caps in the air this month and next, they will be throwing their clothes all over the house. And leaving dishes in the sink and shoes in the hall. And borrowing the car and leaving the gas tank on empty and staying out late and scaring us half to death. And sleeping late on weekends and disappearing out the door with friends without so much as a look behind. One of the realities of this economy is that our children will have a really tough time finding a job after college and, if they do, it isn't likely to pay them enough to allow them to live the life they have been accustomed to. Taxes and health insurance payments can sure put a cramp in your going-out style.
NEWS
By Peter Morici | June 16, 2014
Despite five years of economic recovery, college graduates continue to face a tough job market. Certainly young people should take responsibility for their lives, but parents, educators and politicians all share some blame for their troubles. College graduates earn much higher wages and are less likely to be unemployed than high school graduates - and those gaps are increasing. Still many recent graduates cannot earn enough to live independently, and they often end up in jobs that don't require a college education.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 31, 1994
WASHINGTON -- As college seniors leave their dorm rooms, many will be leaving something else behind as well: health insurance.Of the estimated 1 million students receiving college diplomas this spring, the American College Health Association says 20 percent will lose their health insurance when their college health plan expires or when they no longer qualify as dependents on their parents' policies.Collin Winterbottom, a researcher in the Health and Long Term Care Department of Urban Institute, a nonprofit research organization, said that although more college graduates secure long-term coverage (60 percent)
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera | May 4, 1997
GRADUATING college students get their launch into the working world this month, and, if surveys by the University of Michigan and National Association of Colleges & Employers are to be believed, their prospects haven't been this strong in years. To be sure, the economy is humming along at its healthiest pace since 1987, government figures out last week show. What fields are hot and where's the money? What skills are employers looking for? Is it too late for a May or June grad to start looking?
NEWS
By James E. Lyons Sr. and Daniel J. LaVista | September 24, 2008
This month, the University System of Maryland launched an information campaign to help put more students on a college-bound path at an earlier age. It's a welcome development, because the United States, accustomed to leading the world in higher education, is now facing a shortage of college graduates. (The state's independent colleges and universities, Morgan State University, St. Mary's College and Maryland's 16 community colleges have established similar initiatives.) By the end of the next president's first term, there will be 3 million more jobs requiring a bachelor's degree and not enough college graduates to fill them; 90 percent of the fastest-growing jobs, 60 percent of all new jobs and 40 percent of manufacturing jobs will require some form of postsecondary education.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | September 1, 2002
BALTIMORE'S Teach for America threw a 10th anniversary bash in the rain Thursday night. Fifty-four corps members beginning their second year of teaching in Baltimore welcomed a record 108 newcomers, all fresh out of college, and Tuesday they'll fan out to 41 city schools. The Teach for America idea, proposed by Wendy Kopp in her senior thesis at Princeton University in the 1980s, is simple: Outstanding college graduates commit to teach for two years in the nation's neediest urban and rural schools, where they work for the pitiful pay of the beginning teacher.
BUSINESS
By Daniel Taylor and Daniel Taylor,SUN STAFF | February 26, 2004
The job picture for college graduates is likely to improve this year for the first time since 2001, but competition for work remains fierce because of a tight employment market. Companies said they will hire almost 13 percent more graduates in 2004, compared with last spring, according to a survey by the National Association of Colleges and Employers in Bethlehem, Pa. It marks the first time in three years that employers said they would increase hiring. Companies predicted a 3.6 percent decline in hiring last year and a 20 percent decline in 2002, according to the annual survey.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2003
The school was known as Western Maryland College when they enrolled. It was McDaniel College when they crossed the stage yesterday. So, what should a graduate's diploma say? The 136-year-old school, conducting its first graduation ceremony since last year's name change, gave the 489 students in its class of 2003 a choice. Almost half the students chose a diploma saying they graduated from Western Maryland College. The other half chose one with McDaniel - evidence, college officials said, that the new name, which had drawn criticism, is gaining acceptance.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | June 7, 2014
Given the numerous studies revealing how American education lags behind instruction in other countries in disciplines once thought to be essential, it should come as no surprise that on the 70th anniversary of D-Day, a lot of people are clueless about central elements of the Allied invasion of the European continent on June 6, 1944. The American Council of Trustees and Alumni  (ACTA) has released the results of a survey, which finds only slightly more than half (54 percent)
NEWS
May 22, 2014
Introduction President Loh, thank you for your outstanding leadership here of Maryland's flagship University. Through some of the toughest economic times, you have led us forward to higher excellence and deeper understanding. Thank you, Dr. Loh, for your service, and for inviting me to share this happy moment with all of you today. As I was writing my message for your big day, my young staff warned me of a diabolical new post on Wired.com for such occasions called: Commencement Cliché BINGO   - It arranges no fewer than 24 clichéd graduation phrases on a grid - phrases like   "Be true to yourself.
NEWS
By Freeman A. Hrabowski III | December 22, 2013
A recent New York Times illustration read, "COLLEGE IS FOR SUCKERS. " The words were emblazoned across the sweatshirts of four students, and the accompanying article made essentially that point. It echoed an increasingly common refrain that college is expensive, that students are taking on unmanageable debt and that they too often graduate unprepared for the world of work. In contrast, many economists and educators point to data showing that the fastest growing job categories require at least a college degree.
NEWS
December 6, 2013
As the value of education rises, so does tuition and the demand for a college education ("College is not for everyone," Nov. 26). While college is costly, many schools encourage students to attend college because receiving a college education does ensure a better future. Studies have proven that the gap in employment and earnings between college graduates and those without a degree is growing. According to Georgetown University's Center on Education and the Workforce, approximately 60 percent of jobs statewide today require a college degree.
NEWS
By Freeman A. Hrabowski III | November 24, 2013
Even as a child, I loved math. As a 12-year-old in a Birmingham church in 1963, I found myself much more interested in the math problems in my lap than the speaker at the pulpit. Suddenly, though, he got my attention. If the children march, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. said, people will see that they simply want a better education. It was as if he were reading my mind. I wanted to study in schools with the best facilities and resources, and I was tired of castoff books from the white schools.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood,
For The Baltimore Sun
| August 26, 2013
This week marks the beginning of the end of my high school senior's life in Baltimore County schools. I remember so well his first day of kindergarten when I took off work to take his picture as he got off the school bus. I told him to prepare for a roller coaster of emotions this year. He'll enjoy being the top dog at school, but at the same time, each day will take him closer to the inevitable good-byes that mark high school graduation. This will be a roller coaster year for me as well as I try to accept that my older son is now nearly a man. It's a frightening thought.
BUSINESS
By Carol Kleiman and Carol Kleiman,Chicago Tribune | January 4, 1993
Between 1990 and 2005, 19.8 million college graduates will enter the labor force. What does their future look like?Although education is essential in a workplace with rapidly changing technology, a government study has reached the alarming conclusion that 30 percent of those graduates may have to settle for jobs that do not require a college degree.The leader of the study, Kristina J. Shelley, emphasizes that 70 percent of college graduates will find jobs in which they can apply their educational backgrounds.
NEWS
May 24, 2013
Republicans and Democrats appear to agree on at least one thing: that the United States is facing a STEM (science, technology engineering and math) crisis. In his most recent State of the Union address, President Barack Obama declared that he wants to "reward schools" that focus on STEM classes, for they are "the skills today's employers are looking for to fill jobs right now and in the future. " And as far to the other end of the political spectrum as you can get, Gov. Rick Perry of Texas deemed May 6-12 to be the first ever "Celebration of STEM Education Week in Texas.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | May 22, 2013
Many of you soon-to-be college graduates are determined to make the world a better place. Some of you are choosing careers in public service or joining nonprofits or volunteering in your communities. But many of you are cynical about politics. You see the system as inherently corrupt. You doubt real progress is possible. "What chance do we have against the Koch brothers and the other billionaires?" you've asked me. "How can we fight against Monsanto, Boeing, J.P. Morgan and Bank of America?
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