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By Gregory Kane | November 29, 1998
'TWAS THE morning after Thanksgiving, and the brisk wind blowing across Baltimore Polytechnic Institute's parking lot made what might have been a mildly comfortable morning slightly chilly.Some of the students jammed their hands into their jacket pockets. Others sat on a curb. Some of the wiser ones stretched their limbs, preparing for the hike that would start in a half-hour. Bottles of water stood on the registration table. The chilly students would need them after making the nearly four-mile trek along Cold Spring Lane to Morgan State University's engineering building.
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NEWS
March 11, 2014
In response to Susan Reimer 's March 6 column, "An education is not optional," I say a college education is optional! As a parent, I have to feed, clothe, house and make sure my child attends school through grade 12. Anything beyond those basic necessities is at my will and is based on my economic situation and relationship with my child. As a loving, caring parent I have gone above and beyond those basic necessities. Like my parents before me, I have done without so my child could have those things that were most important to him. However, when or if my child should start making bad choices, then some or all of the luxuries may go away.
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FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Evening Sun Staff | October 22, 1991
THE GOAL of the United Negro College Fund, founded in 1944, is to provide a major source of annual financial support to 41 private, historically black colleges and universities.Funds raised from headquarters in New York, 33 area offices and hundreds of volunteers all over the country go to the member institutions primarily to help keep tuition down, make necessary repairs and upkeep, improve libraries and research capabilities and provide highly qualified faculty members. A small portion is given in scholarships and financial aid to the 50,000 students who enroll.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2012
There is something precarious about the college athletics funding model, in which large universities often  rely on a small number of revenue-producing teams to support “minor” sports such as track and field, swimming and tennis. When the “big” sports falter, the other sports are often casualties. That's part of what happened at Maryland, where seven teams were eliminated as of last July. Revenue declines by Maryland's traditional money makers - football and men's basketball - began in the 2006 fiscal year before the current president and athletic director arrived.
BUSINESS
By Sharon Williams and Sharon Williams,Copley News Service | October 10, 1993
Even though your infant isn't walking yet, you're probably dreaming of the day he'll march down theaisle in cap and gown at his college graduation.Unfortunately, that dream might remain a fantasy if you don't plan for your offspring's campus years.The College Board estimates that today's education and personal expenses already average $15,300 a year at private schools and almost $7,000 at public institutions.And parents of future college students can expect the bill to be much higher. Tuition increases at American universities have averaged nearly twice the rate of inflation during the past decade, and many economists predict the cost will skyrocket even further.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | August 31, 1997
College classes have not met at Patuxent Institution for years, but for the past 10 years inmates there have raised money to send students to historically black public colleges and universities.This year, nearly 300 inmates, who earn no more than $1.30 a day each while in prison, raised about $1,900 for the Thurgood Marshall Scholarship Fund, according to organizers.A year of fund raising culminated yesterday in a walk-a-thon, sporting events, prize drawings for contributors and performances by two inmate bands.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 8, 1998
HAMPTON, Va. -- For the Johnson family, the last 12 months have seemed like a time without hope. They lost jobs, clients and relatives. And though both parents had tried to start saving for their first-grade son's future education needs, they ended up spending his college fund on grocery bills and monthly payments.Their son, Colin, had no idea.He was busy dreaming of becoming an astronaut, or maybe a jet propulsion engineer. After spending part of his summer at NASA's space camp and taking classes for gifted students at Hampton University, Colin was thinking ahead.
NEWS
By Jill L. Zarend and Jill L. Zarend,Staff writer | January 20, 1991
Marika Brown, 16, of Millersville collected $727 for the United Negro College Fund in conjunction with the Lou Rawls Parade of Stars andhas been crowned Miss UNCF Anne Arundel County.The amount the Old Mill High junior brought in was tops in the third annual pageant and fund-raiser sponsored by the Anne Arundel Committee for the Lou RawlsTelethon.Brown is the daughter of Sonia and Wayne Brown.Last year's winner, Kimberly Williams, a senior at Old Mill High, crowned Brown on Dec. 16 at St. Phillips Episcopal Church in Annapolis.
NEWS
March 23, 2009
Dennis M. Newman, Visitation 4-8 P.M., Tuesday, March 24 at Mueller Parker Funeral Home, 6791 Tylersville Road, Mason, Ohio 45040. Visitation also on Wednesday, March 25 from 10 A.M. to service time at 11 A.M. at the funeral home. Memorials may be made to the Dennis M. Newman Scholarship Fund (daughters college fund) at 5th/3rd Bank, 225 W. Main Street, Mason, OH 45040. Condolences may be made at www.muellerparker.com
FEATURES
December 27, 1991
Lou Rawls is back, and this time he's in two places at once.Actually, the "Low Rawls Parade of Stars" telethon will be broadcasting tomorrow from two sites, including the legendary Apollo Theatre in Harlem, a landmark venue that served as a springboard for many black entertainers.According to a spokesman for the show, which supports the United Negro College Fund, actress Jackee (of "227" fame) and veteran nightclub singer Clint Holmes will co-host at the Apollo.Anchoring from the Aquarius Theatre in Hollywood, Calif.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2012
The former president of Baltimore International College allegedly misused more than $200,000 for personal meals, antiques and unapproved salary, according to a legal filing submitted Tuesday by the remaining board of the defunct culinary school. Roger Chylinski, who founded the college and served as its president from 1980 to 2010, sued Baltimore International for $5 million last year, saying that he was not receiving a monthly retirement benefit of $17,000 promised by his contract.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati and Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2011
As a class valedictorian heavily involved in student government and drama who has taken 11 Advanced Placement classes, high school senior Lindsay Michocki was courted by some of the country's top colleges, among them Johns Hopkins, Cornell, the University of Pennsylvania and Yale. But Michocki, who is to graduate soon with a perfect grade-point average at C. Milton Wright High School in Bel Air, turned down their offers in favor of the University of Maryland, College Park, where she thought a merit scholarship from the university coupled with a competitive state scholarship called the Distinguished Scholars award would cover nearly all of her tuition for four years.
NEWS
March 28, 2011
In his letter to The Sun ("Readers respond," March 26), Donald Frost laments giving illegal immigrants the right to pay in-state tuition to state colleges and universities. What he and so many others seem to forget is that these immigrants are being employed by our fellow American citizens, who, by and large are allowed to continue this practice with impunity. Surely, these illegal employers — who ignore checking the status of those they hire — are well known to the authorities, but, with a wink and a nod, get overlooked or given a slap on the wrist.
NEWS
February 23, 2011
So has Baltimore Sen. Lisa Gladden ("Tribute questioned," Feb. 21) actually looked in her own district at the use of the word Negro? She claims it's not a word that's used anymore. I'd like to hear her explanation of the statue, at the steps of City Hall, right here in Baltimore, that's titled "Negro Soldier. " It's a tribute to the "Negro Heroes of the United States. " Well this statue was designed by a Morgan State University professor and artist in 1972 but wasn't added to the lawn of City Hall until 2007.
NEWS
By Jenene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2010
For the second consecutive year, Howard Community College will hold its annual horse-riding competition off-site. The college booted the community event from its highly visible location on the campus grounds last year in favor of adding 535 parking spaces. The 23rd annual Grand Prix, which is open to the public, will take place Saturday at Marama Farm, a 100-acre spread in Clarksville purchased by longtime supporters George and Marilyn Doetsch just months before college officials went looking for a new venue.
NEWS
March 23, 2009
Dennis M. Newman, Visitation 4-8 P.M., Tuesday, March 24 at Mueller Parker Funeral Home, 6791 Tylersville Road, Mason, Ohio 45040. Visitation also on Wednesday, March 25 from 10 A.M. to service time at 11 A.M. at the funeral home. Memorials may be made to the Dennis M. Newman Scholarship Fund (daughters college fund) at 5th/3rd Bank, 225 W. Main Street, Mason, OH 45040. Condolences may be made at www.muellerparker.com
NEWS
By GARLAND L. THOMPSON | June 22, 1991
Aftershocks reverberated around the country as Representative William H. Gray stood before the microphones in New York and said he was happy to be leaving Congress to head the United Negro College Fund. Politicians rushed to fill the shoes Mr. Gray is stepping away from, in the leadership of the House of Representatives and in his hometown of Philadelphia.For almost everyone else, speculation about why he did it is the topic of the day.One theory, mentioned in almost every news story, holds that Mr. Gray, the third-highest ranking member of the House Democratic leadership and the highest-ranked black congressman, is running from a scandal.
NEWS
By SEATTLE TIMES | September 17, 1999
SEATTLE -- With the goal of producing "a new generation of leaders," Bill and Melinda Gates are giving $1 billion to fund scholarships for minority college students.The amount, $50 million a year for 20 years, matches the largest charitable gift ever, the $1 billion donated to the United Nations by media mogul Ted Turner. The grant comes from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, created last month through a merger of the William H. Gates Foundation and Gates Learning Foundation.It will provide a minimum of 1,000 new students each year with any money they need to pay for their education, beyond any other financial aid they get.The program is a response to anti-affirmative-action measures such as last year's Initiative 200, which prohibits race-based admission policies at Washington state colleges and universities.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,stephen.kiehl@baltsun.com | March 10, 2009
Maryland is receiving more than $1 billion in federal stimulus money earmarked for education, and Gov. Martin O'Malley said yesterday he would use some of it to increase funding for community colleges and maintain the freeze on undergraduate tuition at state universities. The governor's initial budget for next year did not include an increase for community colleges, which are seeing thousands more students enroll to gain new skills to help them find jobs in the recession. But with the stimulus money, O'Malley is increasing state aid by 5 percent over the next two years.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE and EILEEN AMBROSE,eileen.ambrose@baltsun.com | October 19, 2008
Forget about your 401(k) for the moment. Have you checked your college savings plan? The recent plunge in stock prices has hit these so-called 529 plans, too. If your child is in grade school or younger, no problem. You have years for the stock market - and your account - to recover. But you might be in a tougher position if your child is headed for college next year and your money is still heavily invested in stocks. You might have to make some adjustments unless the stock market makes a sustained rally soon.
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