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By Matt Vensel | August 15, 2011
Yes, this really exists.
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By Mike Klis and The Denver Post | September 4, 2013
There are some parts Montee Ball wants to keep from his college days. His production, for one. He set all the college career rushing yardage and touchdown records at Wisconsin. He also wants to keep his college number: 28. After practice Tuesday, Ball switched from No. 38 to the No. 28 he wore for the Badgers. But there are other parts of college Ball is glad to leave behind. For the full article, click here .
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SPORTS
By Mike Klis and The Denver Post | September 4, 2013
There are some parts Montee Ball wants to keep from his college days. His production, for one. He set all the college career rushing yardage and touchdown records at Wisconsin. He also wants to keep his college number: 28. After practice Tuesday, Ball switched from No. 38 to the No. 28 he wore for the Badgers. But there are other parts of college Ball is glad to leave behind. For the full article, click here .
SPORTS
Sports Digest | August 1, 2013
Swimming UMBC's Mohamed Hussein breaks Egyptian record UMBC senior Mohamed Hussein broke the Egyptian record in the 200-meter individual medley at the FINA World Championships on Wednesday in Barcelona, Spain. His time of 2 minutes, 2.29 seconds broke his record of 2:03.11, set in Olympics qualifications last year. However, his 29th-place finish out of 50 swimmers was not enough to advance him to the semifinals. He still has swims in the 50 backstroke, 400 medley relay and 800 freestyle relay remaining.
NEWS
By Dolly Merritt | February 3, 1991
A lifelong wish has come true for Mable Lewis. It's been 67 years since she left college, and the 85-year-old Ellicott City resident is finally getting her degree.The alumna of McMurry College, nowMcMurry University, in Abilene, Texas, has many fond memories of hertimes as a student there in 1924 and 1925."She is always talking about Texas and her days when she was astudent attending McMurry College," said Ken Brown, an associate minister at Glen Mar United Methodist Church in Ellicott City, where Lewis is a member.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | April 6, 2012
It was hardly a secret that the Ravens were interested in acquiring a return specialist this offseason. After all, they had Ted Ginn Jr. in for a visit before he re-signed with the San Francisco 49ers and they were reportedly linked to receiver and returner Eddie Royal, who eventually joined the San Diego Chargers. But at Wednesday's news conference at the Castle in Owings Mills, head coach John Harbaugh again confirmed that the Ravens feel a dangerous returner is something they wanted to -- and still can -- add. “We're looking,” he said.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1996
In Loyola College's official graduation program, he is listed as David Allen Johnson, mathematics major, graduate of Trinity University and, oh yes, manager of the Baltimore Orioles.Davey Johnson, a pioneer in using computerized statistical analysis to manage major league games, humorously summed up strike zones and life decisions yesterday for the 750 graduates of the Jesuit college.In a brief speech before 5,000 parents and friends at the Baltimore Arena -- a crowd that spilled into the upper deck -- Johnson said it took him a decade to get his degree because he chose baseball over continuing his education.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | August 1, 2013
Swimming UMBC's Mohamed Hussein breaks Egyptian record UMBC senior Mohamed Hussein broke the Egyptian record in the 200-meter individual medley at the FINA World Championships on Wednesday in Barcelona, Spain. His time of 2 minutes, 2.29 seconds broke his record of 2:03.11, set in Olympics qualifications last year. However, his 29th-place finish out of 50 swimmers was not enough to advance him to the semifinals. He still has swims in the 50 backstroke, 400 medley relay and 800 freestyle relay remaining.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Staff Writer | May 18, 1995
For those holding any hope of Joe Smith spurning the NBA team that drafts him and returning to Maryland next season, here's a word of advice: Move on to the next fantasy.Smith's amazing two-year career in College Park officially came to an end early yesterday morning, when the All-America center signed with an agent, former Terrapins star Len Elmore. The agreement with Elmore to represent Smith took place at the player's home in Norfolk, Va.Under current NCAA rules, an underclassman who declares for early eligibility with the NBA has until 30 days after the draft to return to college as long as he doesn't sign with an agent.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to the Sun | March 5, 2008
Nine-year-old Amanda Daugherty, a third-grader at Longfellow Elementary School, knows she has to go to college if she wants to realize her ambition of becoming a veterinarian. But that message was re- inforced last week when the Columbia school held its third College Day. SoulStice, a hip-hop musician who works by day as an engineer with the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in North Laurel, came to her class to talk about the importance of education. Every classroom received a visit from SoulStice or another speaker, who engaged the students in a talk about college and careers.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | April 6, 2012
It was hardly a secret that the Ravens were interested in acquiring a return specialist this offseason. After all, they had Ted Ginn Jr. in for a visit before he re-signed with the San Francisco 49ers and they were reportedly linked to receiver and returner Eddie Royal, who eventually joined the San Diego Chargers. But at Wednesday's news conference at the Castle in Owings Mills, head coach John Harbaugh again confirmed that the Ravens feel a dangerous returner is something they wanted to -- and still can -- add. “We're looking,” he said.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | August 15, 2011
Yes, this really exists.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,kevin.vanvalkenburg@baltsun.com | April 11, 2009
Dave Pietramala smiles when he hears the question. It's one he has heard before. They look at him - his big-barreled chest, his oak tree of a neck and his linebacker-thick arms - and just assume. You played football growing up, didn't you? No, sadly, Pietramala did not play high school football. It wasn't that he didn't want to, and it wasn't that his parents wouldn't let him. Quite the opposite. There simply was no football in his small world. His tiny Catholic high school, St. Mary's in Hicksville, N.Y., couldn't afford the insurance, and so in the mid-1980s, a generation of broad-shouldered young men like Pietramala were steered to lacrosse and told to seek athletic glory scooping ground balls instead of wrestling running backs to the ground.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to the Sun | March 5, 2008
Nine-year-old Amanda Daugherty, a third-grader at Longfellow Elementary School, knows she has to go to college if she wants to realize her ambition of becoming a veterinarian. But that message was re- inforced last week when the Columbia school held its third College Day. SoulStice, a hip-hop musician who works by day as an engineer with the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in North Laurel, came to her class to talk about the importance of education. Every classroom received a visit from SoulStice or another speaker, who engaged the students in a talk about college and careers.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | November 1, 2004
It's nearing midnight. Johns Hopkins University junior Abby Burch and several other students are setting up a row of chairs in front of the all-night reading room at Gilman Hall. An Enya CD is warbling in the background when Burch barks out a command. "OK you guys, now when people walk by, offer them back rubs," she cries. "Not in a creepy way." Back rubs? It's midterm time at the Homewood campus, and students are in a zombie-like state -- their eyes glazed and unfocused while the gray matter processes Italian politics, linear algebra and the collected tragedies of Aeschylus.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2004
Christianna Bagby never imagined a career as a solider even though she grew up as a "military brat." Toby McIntire, whose father served in the Marines for 27 years, knew as a teenager that she wanted to pursue a disciplined life in the service. They and seven other McDaniel College seniors will be commissioned as Army second lieutenants tomorrow morning, marking their completion of the rigorous ROTC program, before receiving their diplomas at the college's afternoon commencement. While their friends enjoy a summer break or start new jobs, these men and women face the possibility of being deployed to Iraq or other hot spots around the world.
NEWS
By Lorraine Gingerich and Lorraine Gingerich,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 27, 2001
JOSEPH McDONALD of Glenwood is home for the holidays as a new cadet at the U.S. Military Academy in West Point, N.Y. The Glenelg High School graduate is one of about 1,000 plebes - or freshmen - this year at the prestigious school. McDonald spent a whirlwind week visiting friends and family and preparing for the holidays. "My days and nights have been quite full seeing many of my friends for the first time in seven months," he said. McDonald started school in the summer. On Friday, he spoke at Glenelg High School's Alumni College Day about West Point.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | June 6, 2002
With my younger son home from his freshman year at college, his friends are descending on our basement again, and some of them are shooting covetous glances at a flat-panel monitor hooked up to a PC that I use to test hardware and software. "You don't happen to have any extra flat screens lying around, do you?" one of them asked. "I hate my monitor - it takes up my whole desk and there's no room for my stuff." This is one of the less pleasant aspects of college life. Dorms have never been luxurious, but the baby boom's baby boom is putting the squeeze on many colleges.
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