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By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2001
Annapolis police are investigating the shooting death of a 15-year-old boy early yesterday in a public housing development less than a mile west of the State House. Police said the victim, Timothy Lee Sembly Jr., was shot in the back about 3 a.m. while talking to an unknown assailant on a street in College Creek Terrace. According to Officer Eric Crane, a city police spokesman, a 911 caller reported hearing gunshots about 3 a.m. But officers responding to the site in the first block of College Creek Terrace near Clay Street found nothing, he said.
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NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
A midshipman who crashed his SUV into a creek and drowned in February had been drinking at an Annapolis bar earlier that night, a Naval Academy investigation found. Midshipman Max Allen, a senior from Chesterfield, Va., had ordered a burger and several drinks, including "The Max," a Long Island Iced Tea spinoff named after him, with two other midshipmen at the Federal House Bar and Grille on Feb. 14, according to the report. Allen returned to his dorm around 11:30 p.m., then had a phone conversation with a friend around 1 a.m., before leaving again, the report said.
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NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | November 2, 2001
MINNOWS SWIRL and crickets chirp amid the fecund dishabille of bayberry and hibiscus, cattails and spartina grasses, all gone to seed and collapsing back into the mud of the creek shore as autumn advances. It's the merest patch of freshwater marsh, about 85 feet long by 30 feet wide, infinitesimal amid the Chesapeake Bay's thousands of miles of tidal shoreline. Still, its creation made lots of people nervous in 1998, when St. John's College dismantled a bit of its tidy, walled, or bulkheaded, shoreline along College Creek in Annapolis, and let natural vegetation flourish for the first time in half a century.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2014
The Naval Academy will hold a funeral Friday for Midshipman Max Allen, who was found dead in College Creek on Feb. 16 after his SUV crashed into the water. Allen's funeral will be held at noon in the Main Chapel, followed by an on-foot procession to his burial at the Naval Academy Cemetery. A passerby noticed a missing part of the pillar-and-chain fence along the creek by Nimitz Library on Feb. 16. Investigators found Allen's SUV in the water and divers recovered his body from the water.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2002
Construction of the waterfront Bloomsbury Square public housing development in Annapolis is set to begin in mid-May, now that officials and community representatives have agreed on the final design plan. The $7.6 million development of 52 all-brick townhouses and apartments along College Creek will replace the 61-year-old Bloomsbury Square neighborhood, which will be demolished to accommodate a $30 million expansion of the House Office Building. "I think this is an award-winning project," said Mayor Ellen O. Moyer, whose staff helped to redesign the plan to meet historic district and environmental standards.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
A midshipman who crashed his SUV into a creek and drowned in February had been drinking at an Annapolis bar earlier that night, a Naval Academy investigation found. Midshipman Max Allen, a senior from Chesterfield, Va., had ordered a burger and several drinks, including "The Max," a Long Island Iced Tea spinoff named after him, with two other midshipmen at the Federal House Bar and Grille on Feb. 14, according to the report. Allen returned to his dorm around 11:30 p.m., then had a phone conversation with a friend around 1 a.m., before leaving again, the report said.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff Writer | August 31, 1994
Ten years after state officials first began discussing beautification plans for the Rowe Boulevard entrance to Annapolis, work finally is about to begin.A groundbreaking ceremony for the first phase, a $1.42 million project to improve drainage and upgrade the median strip, has been scheduled next Wednesday at Calvary United Methodist Church, on the south side of the boulevard, just west of College Creek.Corman Construction, of Annapolis Junction, has been awarded the contract for the project.
NEWS
By PHILLIP MCGOWAN and PHILLIP MCGOWAN,SUN REPORTER | January 27, 2006
Tim Fletcher emerged from the comfort of a heated SUV and looked out as the wind rippled across the water. Standing on the College Creek bridge, he assessed the progress of a dual bridge reconstruction along Rowe Boulevard as crews used concrete and brick to patch the torn-up overpasses. The cold blasts rippling over the exposed work site -- the other bridge is over Weems Creek -- quickly sent Fletcher and his tour group retreating to the sport utility vehicle. "Yes, building bridges in the summer is much more pleasant," said Fletcher, a project engineer for the State Highway Administration, as he pulled the door shut.
NEWS
By ANDREA F. SIEGEL | October 7, 2005
An Annapolis restaurateur was fined and ordered to perform community service and repay the state for cleanup costs for dumping fuel oil from a tank behind his business that wound its way into College Creek. Paolo Francesco Assante, 57, of Annapolis entered yesterday an Alford plea to discharging oil. In the plea before Anne Arundel County Circuit Judge Ronald A. Silkworth, he acknowledged that there was evidence to convict him, but he did not admit guilt. According to the plea agreement, Assante received a suspended one-year jail sentence, was placed on two years' probation, was fined $1,000, and was ordered to pay the state nearly $6,600 and perform 75 hours of community service, the state attorney general's office said.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2014
The Naval Academy will hold a funeral Friday for Midshipman Max Allen, who was found dead in College Creek on Feb. 16 after his SUV crashed into the water. Allen's funeral will be held at noon in the Main Chapel, followed by an on-foot procession to his burial at the Naval Academy Cemetery. A passerby noticed a missing part of the pillar-and-chain fence along the creek by Nimitz Library on Feb. 16. Investigators found Allen's SUV in the water and divers recovered his body from the water.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2014
Naval Academy officials on Tuesday identified the midshipman who was found dead after apparently crashing his SUV into College Creek as Max Allen, a senior from Virginia. Allen's SUV was discovered in the water Sunday, after a passerby noticed part of the post-and-chain link fence along the water near Nimitz Library was missing. Officials do not know when he crashed the SUV into the water and said it could have happened as early as late Friday night or early Saturday morning. Many midshipmen were away for the weekend due to Monday's holiday and the completion of exams last week.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2012
At the height of the Civil War, a Union soldier climbed into the dome of the State House in Annapolis and described the scene around it, a sea of white tents spreading in every direction. The tents were home to thousands of soldiers captured by the Confederates and returned to the Union army. They would wait in Camp Parole until recalled to service or sent home. In a letter home, another infantryman described the dire conditions in the crowded camp and called the state capital "a low, dirty place.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2011
Talk to some of the old-timers along Annapolis' historic Clay Street, and they'll say the neighborhood has seen its ups and downs: Once a vibrant African-American enclave, replete with black-owned businesses, the neighborhood struggled in the wake of civil rights-era rioting and the crack epidemic. The area is changing again, with a $24 million revitalization of the city's two oldest public-housing complexes, Obery Court and College Creek Terrace. The structures are being torn down and rebuilt with the help of a private developer.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,nicole.fuller@baltsun.com | September 3, 2009
Residents of an aging Annapolis public housing community that is in the midst of a controversial redevelopment project said Wednesday that they have been without utilities repeatedly for the last two weeks. About two dozen residents of College Creek Terrace, a 70-year-old development in downtown Annapolis that is being redeveloped - along with nearby Obery Court - into a publicly funded and privately managed complex, aired their complaints to housing officials during a tense meeting in an outdoor courtyard.
NEWS
By NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON and NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON,SUN REPORTER | August 6, 2006
Alice Spencer sits outside her home of five decades on Obery Court and sees boarded-up apartments and dirt patches where lawns should be. It didn't always look that way. The downtown Annapolis public housing complex, built in 1952 partly on the shores of College Creek, was long ago part of a bustling black neighborhood, with restaurants, shops and clubs, akin to Harlem in its heyday, she recalled. "There were stores, and there was grass and flowers. It was just a beautiful place to walk through," said Spencer, 77. "I would love to see it be like that again before I leave this Earth."
NEWS
By PHILLIP MCGOWAN and PHILLIP MCGOWAN,SUN REPORTER | January 27, 2006
Tim Fletcher emerged from the comfort of a heated SUV and looked out as the wind rippled across the water. Standing on the College Creek bridge, he assessed the progress of a dual bridge reconstruction along Rowe Boulevard as crews used concrete and brick to patch up the torn-up overpasses. The cold blasts rippling over the exposed work site - the other bridge is over Weems Creek - quickly sent Fletcher and his tour group retreating to the sport utility vehicle. "Yes, building bridges in the summer is much more pleasant," said Fletcher, a project engineer for the State Highway Administration, as he pulled the door shut.
NEWS
By Amy Oakes and Amy Oakes,SUN STAFF | June 1, 2000
They don't look like anything more than sunken telephone poles, but these "biologs" might turn out to be a cheaper and more natural way of saving shorelines in Annapolis. As part of a class project, a team of faculty and students from St. John's College has placed biologs, which are compacted coconut fiber, at the bottom of College Creek near the Hodson Boathouse to help stabilize the shoreline for growing marsh grasses. The grasses, which are similar to ones found along the creek in its prehistoric days, will help control shoreline erosion.
NEWS
By ANDREA F. SIEGEL | October 7, 2005
An Annapolis restaurateur was fined and ordered to perform community service and repay the state for cleanup costs for dumping fuel oil from a tank behind his business that wound its way into College Creek. Paolo Francesco Assante, 57, of Annapolis entered yesterday an Alford plea to discharging oil. In the plea before Anne Arundel County Circuit Judge Ronald A. Silkworth, he acknowledged that there was evidence to convict him, but he did not admit guilt. According to the plea agreement, Assante received a suspended one-year jail sentence, was placed on two years' probation, was fined $1,000, and was ordered to pay the state nearly $6,600 and perform 75 hours of community service, the state attorney general's office said.
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