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NEWS
By Ron Smith | August 12, 2010
If you type "college costs bubble" into an Internet search engine as I did recently, you'll find quite the list of news stories and opinion pieces focused on the fact that the costs of higher education have risen so quickly and reached such heights that they are obviously unsustainable. "Unsustainability" is a word we see more and more as the economy continues its weakness. Public worker pension costs are described that way, having been sustained thus far only by tapping the federal Treasury to bail out the many states that can't meet their pension liabilities.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2014
Holding a whiteboard, the University of Maryland, College Park students scrawled their complaints and posed for a picture. "My name is Justin and I spent $114 on ONE textbook," a student wrote. "My name is Jeff and I spent $736 on textbooks," wrote another. The images, posted online by the Student Government Association in recent months, are designed to highlight the rapid rise in the price of college textbooks over the past decade. This semester, the University System of Maryland is exploring ways to bring that cost to zero with "open-source" electronic textbooks — the latest experiment in changing the way students in Maryland and across the nation are taught.
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NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2012
Andrew York hopes to bring better health services to desperately poor Native Americans when he's done earning dual degrees in law and pharmacy from the University of Maryland, Baltimore. But he might not be able to afford that modest-paying career path if not for federal programs designed to forgive part of his $65,000 in college loans. York told his story at a UMB forum Tuesday to discuss federal plans for making college more affordable. The afternoon event featured U.S. Under Secretary of Education Martha J. Kanter, U.S. Rep. John Sarbanes and students and officials from the university.
NEWS
August 29, 2013
There is little doubt that an informed consumer makes better choices. That's why pharmaceuticals should include information about side effects and drug interactions, why food should carry nutrition labels and why potentially dangerous products carry warnings. Public education has gotten much better about informing taxpayers about its product, too. At the touch of a few buttons, Maryland parents can find out how their child's school performed in standardized tests this year and other years, how much their school system is spending on a per-pupil basis and how many are dropping out or graduating in any given year.
NEWS
By Jim Rosapepe | January 31, 2012
President Barack Obama is right. For several decades, college tuitions in our country have risen relentlessly, faster than inflation and faster than economic growth - much like health care costs. Unless we get them under control, we'll continue to fall behind other countries in advanced skills. The good news is that Maryland has developed the model for how to do it. But we've just scratched the surface. There are four major ways to make college more affordable: •increase state investment in our public colleges; •increase efficiency in the delivery of instruction; •increase college credits earned in high school and decrease need for remediation in college; •increase competition from innovative public and private colleges.
NEWS
May 8, 2002
INCREASINGLY, a college-bound student is one who can get a loan -- or pay a great share of his or her own way. It's just not enough to be smart, especially during a recession, according to studies on college affordability released this month. When the economy is in a tailspin, college costs go up: Administrative expenses outpace state spending on higher education, forcing schools to shift more of the burden to the students and their families. It's a scenario playing out across the country and here in Maryland, where state spending on higher education is up but not keeping pace with costs, prompting regents to consider hiking tuition 5.5 percent for 2002-2003.
BUSINESS
By Columbia Features Inc | January 9, 1991
Q. I have a son starting college in three years and another that will be going in nine years. How can I determine how much I will need to save to cover college costs at a state college for both children?A. First, try to determine what the cost of sending your sons to college will be. There are some guidebooks you can purchase that list various college costs. (For example, for the 1989-90 college year, tuition at the University of Maryland at College Park cost $2,270 for state residents, while room and board came to $4,329 and books another $500 for a total of $7099, according to "The Right College," published by the College Research Group of Concord, Ma.)
NEWS
By Leslie Carbone | January 23, 2007
The House of Representatives last week approved a plan to increase federal higher-education spending. The measure moves on to debate in the Senate. The policy's financial planning looks a lot like the stereotypical undergrad's. The College Student Relief Act of 2007 would cut the interest rate on subsidized student loans in half over a period of five years - from 6.8 percent to 3.4 percent - effectively shifting the balance of the cost from those students to the general public. The plan would cost taxpayers nearly $6 billion, according to the Congressional Budget Office.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Staff Writer | October 19, 1992
Skyrocketing college costs are forcing Howard County students and their parents to trim their search for schools, and take a second look at state and regional institutions.Yesterday, dozens of students and their parents shopped for colleges at the Howard County College Fair at Atholton High School. The fair featured 183 colleges as diverse as the Baltimore International Culinary College, Rutgers University and York College of Pennsylvania.According to a recent national College Board report, the average cost of attending public colleges and universities increased 10 percent this fall to $2,315 a year.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Evening Sun Staff | April 1, 1991
Listen to the thoughts of prospective college students:* "I applied to the schools that I'm interested in, but when people say, 'Where are you going to college?' I say, 'Where can I get the most money?' " says Caryn Sokolow, a Pikesville High senior.* "Both my parents work, so the state told me that I don't qualify for financial aid. The state scholarship people said, 'If your father dies, you could qualify.' God forbid my father should die so I can go to college," says Caryn Sagal, a senior at Pikesville.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | July 23, 2013
Students are relying more on grants and scholarships than Mom and Dad to pay for college, according to a study released today from Sallie Mae. In its annual study of “How America Pays for College,” the giant lender said free money in for the form of grants and scholarships now pays 30 percent of the college tab. Four years ago, it was 25 percent. Sallie Mae said students now receive an average of $6,355 in grants and scholarships, compared with $4,859  in 2009. In comparison, parents now kick in 27 percent of college costs or an average of $5,727.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | October 24, 2012
The cost of in-state tuition and fees at public four-year colleges and universities has gone up by about $400, according to a new report by the College Board. The increase is less than years past. But also in the past, federal aid more than kept pace with rising tuition, and so the average cost for students actually went down, the group said. Now, federal aid is no longer rapidly increasing. College Board found that the majority of undergrad students paid an average of about $2,900 in tuition and fees for the 2012-2013 school year, after subtracting the typical financial aid package of $5,750.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2012
Andrew York hopes to bring better health services to desperately poor Native Americans when he's done earning dual degrees in law and pharmacy from the University of Maryland, Baltimore. But he might not be able to afford that modest-paying career path if not for federal programs designed to forgive part of his $65,000 in college loans. York told his story at a UMB forum Tuesday to discuss federal plans for making college more affordable. The afternoon event featured U.S. Under Secretary of Education Martha J. Kanter, U.S. Rep. John Sarbanes and students and officials from the university.
NEWS
By Jim Rosapepe | January 31, 2012
President Barack Obama is right. For several decades, college tuitions in our country have risen relentlessly, faster than inflation and faster than economic growth - much like health care costs. Unless we get them under control, we'll continue to fall behind other countries in advanced skills. The good news is that Maryland has developed the model for how to do it. But we've just scratched the surface. There are four major ways to make college more affordable: •increase state investment in our public colleges; •increase efficiency in the delivery of instruction; •increase college credits earned in high school and decrease need for remediation in college; •increase competition from innovative public and private colleges.
NEWS
By Joan Marshall | January 3, 2012
Education beyond high school is a key to success later in life. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, 62 percent of all U.S. jobs now require a minimum of two-year or four-year degrees or special post-secondary training. That number is expected to increase to 75 percent by 2020. Unfortunately, at the same time that some form of higher education is becoming more important, it's also becoming increasingly more expensive. The College Board calculates that college costs have risen faster than the rates of inflation over this previous academic year.
NEWS
December 11, 2011
I agree with Marta Mossburg's commentary about the unemployed college grads with lots of student loan debt, and liberals who want to believe in black-and-white narratives of the country's financial collapse in order to blame someone ("In Md., your taxes support many of the '1 percent,'" Dec. 7). A possible answer to the college students' plight would be if colleges work with industry to offer grad students free education if they agree to work for a participating company for five years after earning their degrees.
NEWS
October 21, 1998
NO MATTER how you look at the latest statistics on rising college costs, parents are taking a hit in the pocketbook.One headline read, "Price of college education is up 50 percent over a decade." Another noted that "College tuition rises 4 percent, outpacing inflation" and a third said simply, "College tuition continues to rise."It's all true, true, true.Over a decade, tuition rose a whopping average of 50 percent at four-year public colleges, to $3,243 this school year; and 40 percent at private institutions, to $14,508, according to the College Board.
NEWS
November 9, 2011
Along with countless other parents, Susan Reimer complains about the humongous cost of a college education ("Student loans: Obama's reforms won't help the middle class," Nov. 7). I don't blame her. Why, when there are plenty of fine public colleges in Maryland that are within commuting distance, would a family opt for an out-of-state school? Out-of-state tuition is always higher, and living on campus is a huge expense. The idea that you have to go away from home to receive a college education is, in my opinion, a scam.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | November 7, 2011
The time of year for SAT scores and college visits is upon us, and high school seniors everywhere are trying to find a college they like that will have them. News last week that college loan debt reached an all-time high for 2010 graduates - an average of $25,250 - makes the most important question in this process not "Where will I go?" but "How will I pay for it?" Or, perhaps, who will pay for it. I was the first in my family to go to college, and among the first to pay for it with federally guaranteed student loans.
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