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August 22, 2012
At Arkansas, Penn State Teddy Greenstein Chicago Tribune I'll point to two — for totally different reasons. Arkansas' John L. Smith needs to win. Now. His contract runs a mere 10 months. In replacing the disgraced Bobby Petrino, Smith will have to hit it big with a Razorbacks team primed to compete for an SEC title because of studs Knile Davis and Tyler Wilson and a favorable schedule (Alabama and LSU at home). The public won't expect much out of Penn State, but alums will be restless if Bill O'Brien can't win more than five or six games.
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By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2014
More than a month after announcing that the contract of longtime men's basketball coach Fang Mitchell would not be renewed, Coppin State athletic director Derrick Ramsey said Monday he will introduce Stillman College coach Michael Grant as Mitchell's successor at a campus news conference Tuesday. Terms of the contract were not disclosed. “I'm impressed with his work,” Ramsey said in an interview with The Baltimore Sun. “There are two things I'm looking for: the graduation rate, that's critical to me, and he's graduated over 80 percent of his kids.
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SPORTS
By Gary Davidson and Gary Davidson,Contributing Writer | May 29, 1994
It's one-stop shopping for dozens of college recruiters at the 19th annual Columbia Invitational Soccer Tournament this weekend.Seventy-three college coaches are registered to check out the talent at the three-day event that concludes tomorrow with championship matches in 11 boys and nine girls age groups at the Fort Meade Parade Grounds. Tourney publicity and field coordinator Mike Curry said at least another 20 to 30 coaches would arrive unannounced.There's no day at the beach for serious youth soccer players this holiday weekend.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
Delaware's Bob Shillinglaw recently became the first coach in men's college lacrosse to coach 600 career games. The Severna Park native and graduate may not have envisioned such longevity, but he always knew he would be a coach. “I was very, very fortunate,” he said on Wednesday morning. “Very early through high school and college, I made the decision that I wanted to be a coach. Going through my collegiate career, I decided that I really wanted to get into it, the college aspect of it. Right out of North Carolina, I was able to get in as a one-year assistant [at the Massachusetts Maritime Academy]
SPORTS
By CAL RIPKEN JR | February 10, 2008
DEAR CAL -- We're starting to fill out college baseball recruiting questionnaires for our son, who's a great contact hit- ter who rarely strikes out. However, last year he went through a streak during which he was hitting the ball, but right at the other team. It really affected his batting average. On the questionnaires, there's no place to indicate how few times he struck out. Do you think I should contact the coaches to explain that? It doesn't seem that the average tells the whole story.
SPORTS
By HEATHER A. DINICH and HEATHER A. DINICH,SUN REPORTER | April 16, 2006
Considered by many to be among the country's most elite high school basketball players, 7-foot-1 center Kosta Koufos somehow managed to irritate the very college coaches who have been trying desperately to recruit him. Turns out it was a technical glitch. "I had all these coaches complaining that they were sending me text messages and I couldn't respond to them," said Koufos, a high school junior from Canton, Ohio. At the coaches' behest, he went out and bought a new cell phone at a discounted rate of $100 - one capable of receiving their mini messages.
SPORTS
By Mary Beth Kozak and Mary Beth Kozak,SUN STAFF | July 15, 2002
As the rain subsided and the summer heat began to sizzle yesterday on the last day of the Elite 300 lacrosse camp, girls were scrimmaging, shooting at goals, but mostly hoping to score the eye of a college coach. With every ground ball, save and shot, each athlete envisioned herself one step closer to a college scholarship. As the girls raised their sticks in celebrations after scrimmage victories, college coaches were making mental notes on the incoming high school juniors and seniors, searching for recruits for their teams.
SPORTS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,SUN STAFF | October 1, 2001
St. Maria Goretti coach Cokie Robertson's idea turned into reality and a huge success yesterday in the first Baltimore Catholic League Preseason Basketball Showcase. Nearly 70 college coaches were among the crowd that nearly filled Archbishop Spalding's capacity of 850 to watch the BCL's top players participate in an exhibition doubleheader. "It was not the greatest game to watch, but something like this can help kids get opportunities," said Loyola's Jerry Savage, the dean and only coach still in the BCL since it began 31 years ago. Team scores and individual statistics were secondary to what amounted to player auditions in front of such schools as Penn State, Holy Cross, Providence, West Virginia, Wake Forest, South Carolina, La Salle, Princeton, Wake Forest, Loyola, Towson and UMBC.
SPORTS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,SUN STAFF | September 2, 2004
The reflexes required for the digs are impressive. The skills needed by the setters can be underrated. But those making the biggest impression in high school volleyball are the hitters. And among those who have noticed are college coaches, who are doing some hitting of their own in this area in pursuit of prospects. "I think the hitting and players in general have gotten better because the number of club teams has grown," said Dave Trumbo, who coached Liberty to its first state title last year and was named The Sun's Coach of the Year.
NEWS
By Nancy Menefee Jackson and Nancy Menefee Jackson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 22, 2001
Most youth sports these days offer competition for high-skill players that ends with some claim to annual national honors. Soccer has State Cup tournaments. Baseball has a variety of "world series," depending on a league's affiliation. In football, it's Pop Warner play. For basketball players, it's Amateur Athletic Union ball, a competition that is national in scope and that begins locally this weekend, scheduled to avoid high school play. AAU ball is played in a tournament format that college scouts often attend and that, by early August, will produce national boys and girls titlists in various age groups.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2014
A number of factors - being on the wrong end of the ground ball and shot battles and having problems with the man-up offense and man-down defense - played a collaborative role in Goucher's 16-7 loss to Washington College on Saturday. But if there is one lesson Gophers coach Brian Kelly can glean from the season opener, it's that the problems can be addressed and fixed. “They're definitely correctable mistakes,” he said Tuesday morning. “For 30 minutes, what Goucher lacrosse was all about was effective.
SPORTS
By Alexander Pyles, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2014
Dunbar coach Lawrence Smith knows which William Crest moment is his favorite. Crest, the Dunbar quarterback, had already scored two rushing touchdowns against City this past October when the Poets faced a fourth-and-9 from the Knights' 12-yard line, trailing 26-22. The call with 12.4 seconds remaining was a pass, but the senior saw an opening to the left and darted down the sideline, stopping only after his outstretched arms toppled the front pylon of the end zone for the game-winning score.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2013
Not long ago, a 5-foot-11 high school girls basketball player like McDonogh's Dajah Logan never would have brought the ball up court. Her job would have been to get inside, get open and take the feed. The taller you were, the less likely you were to be a guard. That started to change on the college level a while ago and now the trend has trickled down. Tall players, such as Logan, Aberdeen's 6-1 Stephanie Jones and Patterson Mill's 6-foot Qalea Ismail, are developing skill sets that allow them to excel in the back court and play multiple positions.
BUSINESS
By Nicholas Fouriezos, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2013
A record 504 college coaches gathered last weekend at the Wide World of Sports Complex in Orlando, Fla., to watch more than 4,000 high school players in a lacrosse tournament. Behind the scenes, Corrigan Sports Enterprises, the Elkridge firm that also puts on the Baltimore Running Festival, managed the event in partnership with the Intercollegiate Women's Lacrosse Coaches Association. Expanding its foothold in the competitive business of hosting such events, Corrigan Sports recently announced a partnership with the Intercollegiate Men's Lacrosse Coaches Association to manage multiple club and high school lacrosse tournaments.
SPORTS
By Matt Bracken and The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2013
Jordan McNeil didn't pay too much attention to the Towson basketball program growing up, but when coach Pat Skerry came calling this summer, the Mount St. Joseph senior suddenly became “pretty interested” in the Tigers. “It's local and their basketball team was on the rise,” said McNeil, who played AAU ball with Under Armour B'more's Finest. “I really liked it. I didn't have any reason to wait, so I made the decision.”   McNeil, who committed to Towson on Monday afternoon, chose the Tigers over offers from College of Charleston, Toledo and UMBC.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2013
After rolling through an undefeated championship season by an average of 35 points, most football teams would have nothing left to prove. The St. Frances players think they do. "When you talk to everybody else, all they talk about was how we was in the C Conference and didn't play nobody," Panthers senior running back Maurice Williams said. "It's time to show the world that we can do it against a higher caliber. " Third-year St. Frances coach Messay Hailemariam agrees, so the Panthers will take on the Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association A Conference this fall.
NEWS
By Pat O'Malley | September 13, 1991
Ten county basketball players, including 1990-1991 Anne Arundel County Sun Player of the Year Rob Wooster of Annapolis, are going to get a unique opportunity for exposure the last weekend in September.The 6-foot-6 Wooster, who averaged 14.1 points per game for the 4A state finalist Panthers last year, will join nine other county cagers inthe first Charlie Weber Maryland Invitational at Cole Field House, the University of Maryland at College Park, Sept. 27-29.The 17-and-under tournament involves 12 teams from Maryland, North Carolina, Tennessee, Washington and Virginia which will compete before a host of college scouts and coaches.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2011
Christian Carpenter approached this fall with two goals in mind for his senior football season - turning around Aberdeen's 1-9 football team and making college coaches notice his considerable talents on both sides of the ball. After helping the Eagles reach the state semifinals with a 10-3 record and drawing attention from West Virginia, Maryland, Morgan State and Towson, the All-Metro wide receiver could be hanging a "Mission Accomplished" banner. Instead, he's turning more heads in the third season - all-star game time.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2013
Harford Christian Academy boys basketball coach Richard Westerlund is leaving Maryland to take over as the head basketball coach at Crossroads College in Rochester, Minn. Westerlund, an Ellicott City native, guided HCA to a 24-6 record last season. Crossroads is an NAIA II school. "I believe the potential for growth and success is imminent, and I am committed to embracing this process as we look to become one of the premier Christian college basketball programs in the nation," Westerlund said in a news release .  
SPORTS
By Daniel Reese and The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2013
With Kameron Williams and Phil Booth starring in the Mount St. Joseph backcourt, Jaylen Adams was frequently overshadowed during the past two seasons. This summer, however, the rising senior point guard is getting a chance to stand out. Adams has emerged this spring as one of Nike Baltimore Elite's top offensive threats.  A quick, unselfish ball-handler, Adams has proved to be a reliable scorer for the AAU program. “It's been going well,” Adams said after a Nike Elite practice at Baltimore City Community College last week.
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