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NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2004
On college campuses across Maryland -- where the exchange of strong ideas and opinions is not only expected, but encouraged -- there is largely a collective silence concerning American involvement in Iraq. "When we first entered the war, people were protesting and there was a lot of discussion in the classroom," said Brooke Barrash, president of Towson University's College Republicans, which supported the war. "Now that we've been there for some time, people don't pay attention. It just seems like old news."
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NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | July 4, 1993
Havre de Grace. -- For a long time, standing out in the cold, I've been wondering how to gain admission to the exclusive society of American minorities. Clearly, that's the place to be.Everyone who's managed to get inside seems to be having a wonderful time. As seen from the outside, through the thick glass of the windows, an air of opulence and aristocracy, perhaps even of elitism, prevails. It is like a scene at an 18th Century French court, a world beyond the aspirations of les citoyens ordinaires.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | November 18, 1999
THIS AUTUMN, much of my time has been spent touring college campuses with my 17-year-old, a senior in high school who is helping his parents through this stressful ordeal by declaring:a) He doesn't know where he wants to go to college, and;b) He doesn't know what he wants to study.Since this places him in the same demographic as 90 percent of the high school seniors in the country, my wife and I are not too concerned.Instead, we spend our weekends dragging the boy to every college on the East Coast, hoping he might find a school he likes, one that measures up to his rigorous standards, which right now seem to center on which has the most vending machines in its dorms.
NEWS
June 4, 2013
On Friday, President Barack Obama met with college students at the White House to reprise a familiar appeal on behalf of the nation's young people: urging lawmakers to prevent the cost of student college loans from doubling on July 1. Interest rates on Stafford student loans are set to rise from the current 3.4 percent to 6.8 percent at the end of this month unless Congress acts, an increase the president says would add an extra $1,000 a year to...
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2012
Like most students gathered at the Johns Hopkins University on Wednesday to share tacos and watch the first presidential debate of the general election, senior Nicholas DePaul walked into the room as a supporter of President Barack Obama. But 30 minutes into the debate - as Obama and Republican nominee Mitt Romney hashed through their plans to reduce spiraling budget deficits - DePaul seemed deflated by the president's performance selling his economic vision to the country. "I'm afraid to say Romney is probably winning with the public because people react more to emotion in these kinds of things," said DePaul, a Californian who is studying political and environmental science and who spent much of the debate monitoring a political fact-check website on his laptop.
FEATURES
Susan Reimer | April 25, 2012
Just as parents and their high school seniors are about to sign those college acceptance letters, there is news that unless Congress acts by July 1, the interest rate on federal student loans will double from 3.4 percent to 6.8 percent. President Barack Obama has been touring college campuses (in swing states) and chatting up Jimmy Fallon to show his support for keeping interest rates on new loans low, and he talks about "the mountain of debt" he and his wife were under after law school.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | April 16, 2012
President Barack Obama's re-election largely hinges on his ability to play young voters for suckers -- again -- and whether Mitt Romneywill let him. In 2008, Mr. Obama won the youth vote by better than a 2-1 margin, 66 percent to 32 percent. Even more impressive, he actually expanded the share of young voters going to the polls by some 3 million. Those extra voters helped tip several swing states. Mr. Obama owed his success to being a charming political unknown onto whom young people could project their hopes.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey | May 5, 1995
I can still recall the humorous ordeal I'd encounter as a college student years ago whenever I made the foolhardy decision to phone home collect."You say an Andrew Leckey is calling?" asked my mother, sensing her son was calling collect because he was tapped out (( and seeking cash. "No, it can't be the Andrew Leckey we know, since he would handle his money well and wouldn't pester his poor parents with a collect call."Giggle from the operator. Charges not accepted.Subsequent attempts drew tongue-in-cheek responses ranging from "We haven't heard from an Andrew Leckey in so long that we assumed he'd struck out on his own" to "The Andrew Leckey we know is independently wealthy and wouldn't call collect."
NEWS
By Larry Atkins | March 27, 2000
MOST PEOPLE assume that college campuses are safe havens for free speech and enlightened debate. In the case of student newspapers and publications, however, college administrators often try to control these publications to avoid controversy or articles putting the school in a bad light. In October 1998, student editors at Neumann College in suburban Philadelphia temporarily suspended publication of the school newspaper after school administrators demanded prior review in reaction to a controversial editorial cartoon.
NEWS
By Ed Heard and Ed Heard,SUN STAFF | September 28, 1995
An Ellicott City man sitting on a bench at Howard Community College in Columbia was robbed and pistol-whipped Tuesday night, Howard County police said.The victim, Keith Bates, 29, said the gunman approached and demanded money about 9:45 p.m., police said. Although Mr. Bates handed over money, the robber struck him in the face and fled in a white Ford Mustang with another man, police said. Mr. Bates was cut under one eye, police said.The robber was described as white, in his early 20s, with brown hair, thin mustache and goatee.
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