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By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2004
On college campuses across Maryland -- where the exchange of strong ideas and opinions is not only expected, but encouraged -- there is largely a collective silence concerning American involvement in Iraq. "When we first entered the war, people were protesting and there was a lot of discussion in the classroom," said Brooke Barrash, president of Towson University's College Republicans, which supported the war. "Now that we've been there for some time, people don't pay attention. It just seems like old news."
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NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2010
This fall, the hit course on some college campuses may very well be iPad 101. At the University of Maryland, administrators plan to hand out Apple iPads to about 60 students, part of a new two-year program called Digital Culture and Creativity that immerses students in new technologies and focuses on the potential of the iPad to shake up the campus experience. The iPad has experienced early success in the consumer market, with more than 3 million sold since April, and it's already going back to school.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | July 4, 1993
Havre de Grace. -- For a long time, standing out in the cold, I've been wondering how to gain admission to the exclusive society of American minorities. Clearly, that's the place to be.Everyone who's managed to get inside seems to be having a wonderful time. As seen from the outside, through the thick glass of the windows, an air of opulence and aristocracy, perhaps even of elitism, prevails. It is like a scene at an 18th Century French court, a world beyond the aspirations of les citoyens ordinaires.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | November 18, 1999
THIS AUTUMN, much of my time has been spent touring college campuses with my 17-year-old, a senior in high school who is helping his parents through this stressful ordeal by declaring:a) He doesn't know where he wants to go to college, and;b) He doesn't know what he wants to study.Since this places him in the same demographic as 90 percent of the high school seniors in the country, my wife and I are not too concerned.Instead, we spend our weekends dragging the boy to every college on the East Coast, hoping he might find a school he likes, one that measures up to his rigorous standards, which right now seem to center on which has the most vending machines in its dorms.
NEWS
April 29, 2014
The horrifying statistics on rape and sexual assault on college campuses in this country speak for themselves. Studies show that about one in five undergraduate women has experienced such an attack or an attempted attack at some point during their college years, but only 12 percent of incidents are reported. Why is justice so difficult to find in what is supposed to be a protected and enlightened atmosphere of a college or university? Advocates say there are numerous institutional barriers that discourage reporting, including administrators who treat reports of sexual assault with disbelief and on-campus judicial systems that are difficult for a victim to navigate.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | April 16, 2012
President Barack Obama's re-election largely hinges on his ability to play young voters for suckers -- again -- and whether Mitt Romneywill let him. In 2008, Mr. Obama won the youth vote by better than a 2-1 margin, 66 percent to 32 percent. Even more impressive, he actually expanded the share of young voters going to the polls by some 3 million. Those extra voters helped tip several swing states. Mr. Obama owed his success to being a charming political unknown onto whom young people could project their hopes.
NEWS
June 4, 2013
On Friday, President Barack Obama met with college students at the White House to reprise a familiar appeal on behalf of the nation's young people: urging lawmakers to prevent the cost of student college loans from doubling on July 1. Interest rates on Stafford student loans are set to rise from the current 3.4 percent to 6.8 percent at the end of this month unless Congress acts, an increase the president says would add an extra $1,000 a year to...
FEATURES
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | October 4, 1998
MY SON IS a senior in high school, which means that pretty soon he, like millions of other seniors, will have to make a crucial decision, the consequences of which will remain with him for the rest of his life: Who will be his prom date.Also, at some point he'll probably select a college. In fact, we've already gone on several college visits, which are helpful in choosing a college because you can get answers to important academic questions such as:* Is there parking?* Are all the students required to get body piercings?
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2012
Like most students gathered at the Johns Hopkins University on Wednesday to share tacos and watch the first presidential debate of the general election, senior Nicholas DePaul walked into the room as a supporter of President Barack Obama. But 30 minutes into the debate - as Obama and Republican nominee Mitt Romney hashed through their plans to reduce spiraling budget deficits - DePaul seemed deflated by the president's performance selling his economic vision to the country. "I'm afraid to say Romney is probably winning with the public because people react more to emotion in these kinds of things," said DePaul, a Californian who is studying political and environmental science and who spent much of the debate monitoring a political fact-check website on his laptop.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | May 25, 2014
I've been thinking a lot about college lately. It's not as though it's staring me in the face, either. The oldest is finishing his freshman year in high school. The youngest is still in elementary school. Still, what's occurring on America's college campuses is on my front burner. First and foremost is the ever-escalating cost of a four-year degree - the cause of many a sleepless night for moms and dads. Tuition, fees, room and board for many private colleges has now hit $60,000 a year.
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