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By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Staff Writer | December 15, 1992
Why people hate one another because of skin color or ethnic background always has sparked sociologist Howard J. Ehrlich's interest -- even when he was a kid.He witnessed the senselessness of ethnic violence at an early age when he saw New York street gangs clash.For the past eight years, Dr. Ehrlich -- he has a doctorate in sociology from Michigan State University -- has documented racist acts and studied prejudice as research director at the National Institute Against Prejudice and Violence in Baltimore.
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NEWS
October 7, 1993
It is a tragedy repeated too often: Young men and women go off to college -- usually their first experience living on their own -- and within short order they turn up dead, victims of an apparent suicide. In the 1970s, suicide among students became a frequent occurrence on college campuses, although at the time hallucinogens often were the culprit. Today, the drug of choice appears to be alcohol, a drug that is considered benign but can be just as lethal.We offer our condolences to the family and friends of Jeffrey Steven Welkos of Ellicott City; it is their turn to mourn.
NEWS
By JoAnne C. Broadwater and JoAnne C. Broadwater,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 22, 2001
Chara Bauer, 17, is never sure what to answer when someone asks what grade she's attending at school. "I usually ask them if they want to know about high school or college," she said. "Then I say that I'm a senior in high school, and I'm finishing up my sophomore year of college." The Baltimore resident is one of a small but growing number of high-school-age homeschoolers who are finding a second home on the campuses of community colleges across Maryland. They're completing high school courses such as chemistry and calculus that might be difficult to study at home.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 12, 2007
Federal agents are warning leaders at some of the region's top universities to be on the lookout for foreign spies or potential terrorists trying to steal their research, the head of the FBI's Boston office said yesterday. Agents plan to visit many more colleges in the coming months and are offering to provide briefings about what they call "espionage indicators" to faculty, students or security staff as part of a national outreach to college campuses. "What we're most concerned about are those things that are not classified being developed by MIT, Worcester Polytech and other universities," said Warren T. Bamford, special agent in charge of the FBI's Boston office.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | April 15, 2007
Westminster Mayor Tom Ferguson said he never imagined he would find himself welcoming to town the author of a play as candid and jarring as The Vagina Monologues. But feminist playwright Eve Ensler, who promotes her work around the world, is coming to Carroll Community College for a local rendition of her play Friday. It is the county's fifth performance of The Vagina Monologues, and organizers said they have been hoping for years to lure Ensler here. Still, given Ensler's celebrity and worldwide travels, activist and organizer Sylviea Tejeda can't believe the celebrated playwright is visiting.
NEWS
By Tim Jones and Tim Jones,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 16, 2004
CHICAGO - President Bush's support on college campuses has dropped substantially in the past six months because of growing student dissatisfaction with the war in Iraq, the weak job market and Bush's stance on gay marriage, according to a poll released yesterday. The survey from the Kennedy School of Government's Institute of Politics at Harvard University showed college students favoring Sen. John Kerry, the presumptive Democratic nominee, over Bush, 48 percent to 38 percent. Independent candidate Ralph Nader drew the support of 5 percent.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | September 29, 2014
Last Friday, the White House announced an "It's On Us" initiative aimed at combating sexual assaults on college campuses. I'm all in favor of combating sexual assault, but the first priority in combating a problem is understanding it. That's not the White House's first priority. Roughly six weeks before Election Day, its chief concern is to translate an exciting social media campaign into a get-out-the-vote operation. Accurate statistics are of limited use in that regard because rape and sexual assault have been declining for decades.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2011
With a tap on his smartphone, University of Maryland student Shiv Krishnamoorthy can instantly alert police as he walks through the dimly lit corners of the College Park campus — and share with them his precise location, plus live video and audio. The app, which was developed by a university computer science professor and a team of students in conjunction with campus police, is the first of its kind in the small but growing field of smartphone apps for campus security. M-Urgency will be available to Maryland students, faculty and staff early next month.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2004
On college campuses across Maryland -- where the exchange of strong ideas and opinions is not only expected, but encouraged -- there is largely a collective silence concerning American involvement in Iraq. "When we first entered the war, people were protesting and there was a lot of discussion in the classroom," said Brooke Barrash, president of Towson University's College Republicans, which supported the war. "Now that we've been there for some time, people don't pay attention. It just seems like old news."
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | January 22, 1991
The people on the radio have the sound of machine guns in their voices. They want the war protesters taken out and shot at dawn on "Good Morning, America." I couldn't agree with them less.Am I against this war? Don't ask me that for a few more paragraphs, OK? It's not the war I'm talking about, it's people's memories. I think they were shot off in the last war."Why doesn't one of his own people kill him?" I heard a woman say on the radio.She was talking about Saddam Hussein. Her thinking seems to be: If it's so clear to everybody around here that Hussein's a barbarian, then why isn't it clear to someone in Iraq, someone close to Hussein or someone in one of those little manufactured street rallies they tape for TV consumption, one lousy person in that whole country who can see the destruction he's wreaking and has the courage to end it instead of marching lock-step with all the other Iraqis?
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