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NEWS
By Tim Jones and Tim Jones,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 16, 2004
CHICAGO - President Bush's support on college campuses has dropped substantially in the past six months because of growing student dissatisfaction with the war in Iraq, the weak job market and Bush's stance on gay marriage, according to a poll released yesterday. The survey from the Kennedy School of Government's Institute of Politics at Harvard University showed college students favoring Sen. John Kerry, the presumptive Democratic nominee, over Bush, 48 percent to 38 percent. Independent candidate Ralph Nader drew the support of 5 percent.
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NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | September 29, 2014
Last Friday, the White House announced an "It's On Us" initiative aimed at combating sexual assaults on college campuses. I'm all in favor of combating sexual assault, but the first priority in combating a problem is understanding it. That's not the White House's first priority. Roughly six weeks before Election Day, its chief concern is to translate an exciting social media campaign into a get-out-the-vote operation. Accurate statistics are of limited use in that regard because rape and sexual assault have been declining for decades.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella | January 16, 1991
Like an echo that took more than 20 years to reverberate, the cry is heard once again on college campuses:"Hell no, we won't go."Some members of another generation of college students want to give peace a chance. As with the Vietnam War, the conflict in the Persian Gulf is beginning to meet resistance on college campuses across the country."I cannot sit back and allow myself to be drafted. I just think it's a matter of time before [the draft is] reinstated, and it scares me, FTC and it scares a lot of other students," said Eric Hansen, 23, a student at the University of Maryland's School of Social Work in Baltimore.
NEWS
May 20, 1998
Colleges' new leader has wealth of vision but too little 0) supportThe article "Colleges' chancellor sees need to expand" (May 14) indicates that finally someone with authority has vision.Community Colleges of Baltimore County Chancellor Irving Pressley McPhail is conscious of what has been happening at Dundalk Community College for more than 15 years. DCC has been actively retraining former employees of Bethlehem Steel and other industry giants since the layoffs of the 1980s.Re-educating and teaching new technological skills to adults benefits society tremendously by reducing unemployment and allowing increased wages and, consequently, increased sales tax and income tax revenues.
NEWS
By Shirley Leung and Shirley Leung,Sun Staff Writer | April 9, 1995
Students at Loyola College touched off a three-week debate in February when they took out a full-page advertisement in the campus newspaper denouncing a human sexuality course as "detrimental to the soul of our college."But similar courses have operated with little controversy for years at other campuses.At Towson State University, University of Maryland College Park and Coppin State College, professors say courses are so popular there are often waiting lists to get in. College of Notre Dame has been offering a psychology course in sexuality for 15 )
NEWS
October 7, 1993
It is a tragedy repeated too often: Young men and women go off to college -- usually their first experience living on their own -- and within short order they turn up dead, victims of an apparent suicide.In the 1970s, suicide among students became a frequent occurrence on college campuses, although at the time hallucinogens often were the culprit. Today, the drug of choice appears to be alcohol, a drug that is considered benign but can be just as lethal.We offer our condolences to the family and friends of Jeffrey Steven Welkos of Ellicott City; it is their turn to mourn.
NEWS
May 13, 2011
Two articles in The Sun of May 11th present an alarming picture of Gov. Martin O'Malley's priorities for supporting higher education in the state. In her commentary "Maryland's uneducated graduates," Marta H. Mossburg of the Maryland Public Policy Institute reports that huge numbers of Maryland's high school graduates show up annually on college campuses in need of remedial courses in math and/or English before they may enroll for credit-bearing courses. Her statistics are largely drawn from the community college level: 65-70 percent at Montgomery College, 74 percent at CCBC in Baltimore County, and a whopping 80 percent at BCCC in Baltimore City.
NEWS
October 7, 1993
It is a tragedy repeated too often: Young men and women go off to college -- usually their first experience living on their own -- and within short order they turn up dead, victims of an apparent suicide. In the 1970s, suicide among students became a frequent occurrence on college campuses, although at the time hallucinogens often were the culprit. Today, the drug of choice appears to be alcohol, a drug that is considered benign but can be just as lethal.We offer our condolences to the family and friends of Jeffrey Steven Welkos of Ellicott City; it is their turn to mourn.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2002
Saying the Johns Hopkins University neighborhood needs more "zap and zing," one of Baltimore's most prominent developers is buying up properties in a block of Charles Village that he hopes to transform into a shopping and residential hub near the campus. The plan by Struever Bros., Eccles & Rouse to buy most if not all of the 3200 block of St. Paul St. goes hand in hand with a development project by Hopkins leaders to reshape the streetscape of Charles Village, which seems destined for a face lift that planners hope will make it a more attractive place to live and work.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2010
A dual degree program that will debut in Baltimore County high schools next summer will allow qualified students to pursue college courses as early as their sophomore year and earn an associate of arts degree along with a high school diploma. The partnership between county schools and the Community College of Baltimore County will save parents money, challenge motivated students and allow 18-year-olds to transfer to a four-year college as juniors. The county will recruit candidates for its Diploma to Degree program, believed to be the first in the state, in the spring from the current class of high school freshmen.
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