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July 28, 2012
The recent editorial regarding the sanctions imposed on Penn State by the NCAA ("Penn State sanctions aren't enough," July 24) concluded with the statement that the NCAA "needs to make this penalty the first step toward reining in a sport that has grown too rich and too powerful. " Here are three suggestions that the NCAA could adopt reasonably quickly to put college athletics back in its proper perspective on college campuses: First, eliminate athletic dormitories so that athletes can experience life on a college campus more broadly.
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SPORTS
By Matt Zenitz and Baltimore Sun Media Group | September 30, 2014
The University of Connecticut has completed fundraising for a memorial in honor of former Huskies cornerback Jasper Howard, who was killed at an on-campus dance in 2009. The “lead gift” for the memorial came from Maryland's Randy Edsall, who was Howard's coach at Connecticut. “Jasper Howard represented everything that is good about college athletics,” Edsall said in a statement released by Connecticut. “He loved being a student-athlete at UConn. His tragic death had a bonding reaction with the entire UConn community that none of us will ever forget for the rest of our lives.” Former Connecticut players, as well as Huskies fans from around the country, contributed towards constructing the statue as well.
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NEWS
By Brian Griffiths | February 3, 2014
Last week, in what has to be one of the more ridiculous stories that I have seen in a while, football players at Northwestern University in Chicago filed the necessary paperwork to begin the process of forming a union. Certainly, you can say that college athletes have a reason to be displeased in many instances. One need only to look at the O'Bannon lawsuit regarding royalties surrounding video game likenesses, or the recent revelation of unsanitary and unsafe conditions at Grambling to know that players have a beef with the system.
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | August 19, 2014
Two recent major developments may revolutionize major college sports, potentially to the benefit of long-exploited college athletes. It's about time. On August 7 the National Collegiate Athletic Association decreed that the five major conferences - the University of Maryland's former and new conferences, the ACC and the Big Ten; plus the Big 12, PAC-12 and the SEC - shall have greater autonomy to develop policies that specifically meet their needs. Experts believe the five conferences' 65 member universities could, among other changes, begin to pay annual stipends for student-athletes and cover their tuition and other scholastic costs after their eligibility has expired.
SPORTS
By Don Markus | don.markus@baltsun.com | February 15, 2010
- Within minutes of announcing that she was bringing back football coach Ralph Friedgen for a 10th season at the University of Maryland, Debbie Yow's BlackBerry began to fill up with messages. The first two, she said, were enough to take the pulse of a constituency that had become increasingly frustrated with Friedgen - as well as with Yow - toward the end of a disastrous 2009 season. "The first e-mail said, 'This proves you're the best AD Maryland has ever had,' " Yow recalled of that early December day. "The second e-mail read, 'I will have you fired by 5 o'clock tomorrow afternoon and I'm going right to President Mote.
NEWS
By Ralph Nader and Ken Reed | November 27, 2012
When it comes to college athletics, it's time to speak truth to evil. You might think evil is too strong a word for what's going on in college athletics, but consider how Webster's Dictionary defines evil: morally reprehensible; causing harm; offensive. That pretty much sums up the state of big-time college sports today. The inane move of Maryland and Rutgers to the Big Ten is simply the latest example. Here's the current reality of college sports: •NCAA Division I sports - especially at Football Bowl Subdivision schools - has nothing to do with education.
NEWS
By Allen Barra | December 26, 1991
ERIC RAMSEY, a former Auburn University football player, is spinning tapes in public that could shake the foundation of college football.Ramsey has apparently taped more than 100 hours of conversations with Auburn coaches, alumni and even the head coach, Pat Dye. They catalog more violations concerning his own wages and working conditions than the National Collegiate Athletic Association can shake a stick at. (But, rest assured, the NCAA will find a...
SPORTS
By PHIL JACKMAN | September 14, 1995
The basis of college humor is poor taste. It has probably been that way since Harvard College opened its doors in 1636. That should have been taken into account last week when the student newspaper at the University of Nebraska ran a cartoon taking a shot at the off-the-field escapades of some of the football players.Don't darken my practice field again, squeaky clean coach Tom Osborne decreed: "Attending our practices is a privilege, not a right."Wait just a moment, Tommy, what's this "my" and "our" business?
NEWS
By C. FRASER SMITH | June 20, 1993
It used to be, when the crimes of intercollegiate sports flashed into public view, that defenders blamed what they said were a few rotten apples. The vast majority of programs, they insisted, were crisp and clean.It was assumed the clean programs would stay that way -- free of under-the-table cash payments to athletes, free of grade-tampering to preserve eligibility and thus free of the consequent low graduation rates.Today the assumption is different. By now, sports fans fear that almost every program is or will become dirty.
NEWS
By Bob Leffler | April 15, 2013
For full disclosure's sake, I am a 1968 graduate of what is now Towson University (and a 1974 graduate of Morgan State University). I taught high school for 14 years and founded an advertising agency that has a sports specialty. Our company has done sports ticket sales campaigns for 43 university programs in 24 states over a 30 year period - including Towson - as well as several pro teams, including all of the local franchises. To say that specializing in college athletics is not a way to build a big media billing agency is an understatement.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | April 13, 2014
Perhaps you missed ... a regional National Labor Relations Board decision that ruled Northwestern University's football players are "employees" subject to union representation. And before you dismiss this decision as the ravings of some bureaucrat laborite, remember that the appeal goes to the full Barack Obama-controlled board, now simply a satellite operation for the AFL-CIO. My readers can figure out the myriad problems with this concept on their own, but allow me one simple illustration of the awkwardness involved.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2014
COLLEGE PARK - A National Labor Relations Board official's decision that Northwestern's scholarship football players can vote to unionize is likely to accelerate the pace of NCAA reforms and "change the landscape" of college athletics, Maryland coach Randy Edsall said Thursday. "I think there are issues that we do have that need to be addressed," Edsall told reporters after practice. "With that ruling, I would think there are going to be some things that would change in terms of the structure.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
James J. Lacy Jr., who set a national scoring record as a standout basketball forward at what is now Loyola University Maryland and was a retired insurance broker, died of complications from melanoma Saturday at his North Roland Park home. He was 87. In 1949, Mr. Lacy was the nation's highest-scoring collegiate basketball player with 2,199 points. "People worshipped him as a player. He was known as No. 16," said former Evening Sun sports editor Bill Tanton. "They played in that little bandbox [of an arena]
NEWS
By Brian Griffiths | February 3, 2014
Last week, in what has to be one of the more ridiculous stories that I have seen in a while, football players at Northwestern University in Chicago filed the necessary paperwork to begin the process of forming a union. Certainly, you can say that college athletes have a reason to be displeased in many instances. One need only to look at the O'Bannon lawsuit regarding royalties surrounding video game likenesses, or the recent revelation of unsanitary and unsafe conditions at Grambling to know that players have a beef with the system.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2013
Kenny Tate's college football career enabled him to fulfill a dream, while all but ending another dream -- that of an NFL career. It doesn't seem like a favorable tradeoff.  Tate and countless other  top pro prospects  played college football for free, became injured and -- in their diminished states -- missed out on opportunities  to cash in on their talents  in the NFL. Make no mistake. Tate got what he wanted from the University of Maryland. The former All-ACC safety got to play on a big stage in which he could showcase his ample talents.
NEWS
November 2, 2013
In "A new day for athletes" (Oct. 30), Paul Marx demonstrates an embarrassing lack of knowledge and research about his subject. The graduation rate by 2011 for all freshmen entering at all U.S. colleges and universities in 2005 was 59 percent, 61 percent for women and 56 percent for men. Meanwhile, "[a]ccording to the most recent Graduation Success Rate data 82 percent of Division I freshmen scholarship student-athletes who entered college in 2004 earned a degree. In Division II, 73 percent of freshmen student-athletes who entered college in 2004 graduated.
NEWS
October 4, 2001
The Glenelg High School Guidance Department and PTSA will sponsor a College Planning Symposium from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Oct. 15 at the school. Martha Gagnon will discuss "The ABCs of College Planning." Sessions will include discussions of selective or private schools, Maryland universities, community college and technology options, military academies and ROTC programs and college athletics - how to contact coaches and seek scholarships. Refreshments will be served. Information: 410-313-5535.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2013
The lasting memory Denver players and coaches have of their most recent game was an 11-10 loss to Ohio State that rewarded the Buckeyes with their first Eastern College Athletic Conference tournament and the third seed in the NCAA tournament. The setback did not hurt the Pioneers (12-4) terribly - they still earned the fourth seed and a home game against Albany (13-4) in the first round of the NCAA tournament Saturday - but the loss has lingered a bit. “Anytime you have a tough loss like that, I think it's going to linger for a couple days, but I think with the quick turnaround to the NCAA tournament, we can't really bemoan that loss or think about that loss,” senior attackman Eric Law said Wednesday.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2013
No. 7 Loyola took great joy in snapping a 13-game losing skid to No. 13 Johns Hopkins with Saturday's 8-4 victory. But even happier times could just be down the road. Saturday's win may have further strengthened the reigning national champion's pursuit of an at-large berth to the NCAA tournament regardless of what occurs in the Eastern College Athletic Conference tournament being held at Hobart in Geneva, N.Y. later this week. According to Laxpower.com which compiles its own Rating Percentage Index (RPI)
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