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NEWS
October 18, 2013
Regarding your editorial, "Race and college admissions" (Oct. 17), you champion school administrators as the sole arbiters of college admissions. Would that you allowed property owners and businesses to choose who they want as renters and customers. Didn't think so. None of the above issues are about race, they are about power, who wields it and who suffers from it. Generally, you progressives are the first to run to the courts when a vote or election goes against your holier-than-thou beliefs.
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NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
When John Crosby takes his final exams this week, it will be a lot like playing "Jeopardy. " Every question could be the one that costs the Polytechnic Institute senior thousands of dollars. The basketball player has 20 potential athletic scholarships, totaling more than $1 million, riding on his final exams, which he must score well on to maintain his GPA and choose from universities like Cornell and Xavier. It's a daunting task at the rigorous Poly — made even more difficult by a citywide policy that gives less weight to grades in Advanced Placement and honors courses than any other school district in the Baltimore region.
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NEWS
October 9, 2012
The U.S. Supreme Court takes up the issue of racial preference in college admissions on Wednesday, and that ought to be a concern for those who believe such policies have provided countless opportunities for minorities - and enriched the educational experience for whites. There is a growing movement in this country to eliminate affirmative action on the grounds that it's no longer needed - or was even helpful in the first place. Granted, this can be a complex issue, and even the most liberal interpretations of the race-conscious policy acknowledge that a balance must be struck to make colleges diverse but also keep the admissions process fair and merit-based.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2014
The SAT — that anxiety-provoking test required for so many college applications — is being redesigned to focus more on classroom learning and less on brain teasers. The College Board announced Wednesday that its revised SAT will be ready in the spring of 2016. The new version will have two parts, "evidence-based reading and writing" and math, and will return to a highest possible score of 1600. An optional essay question will be graded separately. "I hope it takes some of the intense anxiety of this high-stakes exam away," said Barbara Gill, assistant vice president of undergraduate admissions at the University of Maryland, College Park and a College Board trustee.
NEWS
By Jonathan Zimmerman | April 18, 2010
Steven got nearly perfect SAT scores, but he didn't get into Princeton. Suzanne has straight A's, but Brown rejected her. And Samantha — Samantha! — got into both schools, even though her scores and grades are pretty mediocre. Can you believe it? Welcome to an average school day in April, the cruelest month of the calendar for America's upper-middle-class teens. If you live in a leafy American suburb, as I do, you simply can't escape the drudgery and the drama of the college admissions sweepstakes.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 5, 2001
WALNUT CREEK, Calif. - The percentage of minority students admitted to the University of California has nearly reached affirmative action levels, according to figures released this week. In addition, the system admitted 10 percent more Californians than last year. Of the students the UC system admitted for the fall 2001 freshman class, 18.6 percent were black, Latino, Chicano and American Indian. That's a percentage point increase over last year and just shy of 1997's 18.8 percent, the last time the university used racial preferences in admissions.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,childs.walker@baltsun.com | June 21, 2009
College admissions officers did not know what to expect heading into this year's application period. They wondered if the recession would drive students toward in-state or public colleges and away from more expensive ones - or committing to any college at all. Despite evidence that such trends occurred nationally, Maryland admissions officers are generally relieved at how little change they have observed in the state. Students applied and committed to Maryland colleges and universities, public and private, at robust levels this spring.
NEWS
By EMILY HAHN | February 19, 2006
I suffer from an acute case of admissionitis gravis (n. Abbr. AdGrav. 1. A disease of high school seniors characterized by severe anxiety, often developing into writer's block, mental paralysis and overall paranoia. 2. A state of anxiety experienced by adolescents facing the need to craft powerful personal essays for college admissions, despite having lived relatively brief, less-than-powerful lives. From Latin admissio, admission, and gravitas, heavy). The definitive, telltale symptom of my disease?
NEWS
By LIZ F. KAY and LIZ F. KAY,SUN REPORTER | May 10, 2006
Jovan Edmunds has guided 316 seniors through the college admissions process as a school counselor for the Class of 2006 at Dundalk High School. She presented college information to all senior classes, wrote recommendation letters for at least 100 students and reminded others to sign up for college entrance exams. Next fall, she and other counselors at Dundalk and Woodlawn high schools will have a little more help, thanks to a new program coordinated through 100 Black Men of Maryland. The 100 College Access Program will hire a part-time counselor for each school to assist next year's juniors and seniors in meeting deadlines and overcoming economic barriers to higher education.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | July 21, 2003
It is not unusual for high school seniors to complain of meddling parents telling them where to go to college and nagging them about their applications. But for the 40 students who spent this weekend at Goucher College, such a complaint is a luxury. The students, mostly from Washington high schools, receive little application advice from their parents -- most of whom didn't go college -- or from their guidance counselors, who are swamped with large caseloads. Instead, the students rely on College Summit, a 10-year-old program that trains low-income students in negotiating the application process.
NEWS
October 18, 2013
Regarding your editorial, "Race and college admissions" (Oct. 17), you champion school administrators as the sole arbiters of college admissions. Would that you allowed property owners and businesses to choose who they want as renters and customers. Didn't think so. None of the above issues are about race, they are about power, who wields it and who suffers from it. Generally, you progressives are the first to run to the courts when a vote or election goes against your holier-than-thou beliefs.
NEWS
October 16, 2013
Anybody who has ever encountered the college admissions process knows that there's no such thing as an even playing field. Most schools will admit that upfront. "Like all colleges," Harvard College notes on its own admissions web site, "we seek to admit the most interesting, able, and diverse class possible. " In other words, schools often try to balance out an incoming class with students who not only have good grades or high test scores but have had unusual life experiences as well as those they regard as "well rounded.
NEWS
December 17, 2012
Op-ed contributor Carlene Buccino's argument against the objectivity of SAT scores is compelling but flawed ("The best test scores money can buy," Dec. 13). There is a robust literature that supports the use of SAT scores in the admissions process. Generally, institutions of higher learning are well-versed regarding literature that suggests the cultural, socio-economic and gender biases of the SAT and other standardized exams. In fact, some institutions tier the SAT bottom-line in adherence to the literature.
NEWS
By Mary Sanchez | October 21, 2012
It may be time to say farewell to affirmative action in higher education admissions and to the aspirations that went with it. The U.S. Supreme Court will soon hear arguments in Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin, a case challenging the sliver of consideration the university gives to race and ethnicity when deciding whom to admit. It is already being billed as "the case that killed affirmative action. " That may prove true, as the make-up of the Supreme Court has changed considerably since the last time it looked at this heated issue, in 2003.
NEWS
October 9, 2012
The U.S. Supreme Court takes up the issue of racial preference in college admissions on Wednesday, and that ought to be a concern for those who believe such policies have provided countless opportunities for minorities - and enriched the educational experience for whites. There is a growing movement in this country to eliminate affirmative action on the grounds that it's no longer needed - or was even helpful in the first place. Granted, this can be a complex issue, and even the most liberal interpretations of the race-conscious policy acknowledge that a balance must be struck to make colleges diverse but also keep the admissions process fair and merit-based.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2011
The number of Baltimore City high school graduates enrolling in four-year colleges and universities has dropped in recent years as more head to two-year institutions where they are far less likely to graduate. The Baltimore Education Research Consortium at Johns Hopkins University found the percentage of city public school graduates heading to two-year-institutions rose 12 percentage points over four years to 52 percent in 2010, while the percentage of students enrolled in four-year-colleges declined 12 percentage points to 49 percent.
NEWS
By Mike Adams and Mike Adams,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2003
WASHINGTON - Thousands of demonstrators are expected tomorrow when the U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments about whether the University of Michigan's undergraduate college and law school should be allowed to use race as a factor in admissions. Civil rights groups, including the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, plan to rally outside the high court in a show of support for affirmative action. The justices are scheduled to hear a 1997 case filed by two white students rejected by the undergraduate school, and a separate case filed the same year by a white student rejected by the law school.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2003
WHAT DOES Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s plan to install slot machines at Maryland racetracks have in common with President Bush's plan to achieve racial diversity in college admissions? Each is a pact with the devil, employing a social negative to foster social good. Ehrlich would put more than 40 percent of the profits from slots gambling into Maryland public schools. Bush wants to make college admissions "race-neutral" by guaranteeing public university access to students who graduate in the top 5 percent or 10 percent of their high school classes.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2011
School officials fear that college admissions were compromised for more than a dozen seniors at Baltimore's prestigious Western High School because the school failed to send complete application materials. "Shortly before the spring break, I learned that some college admissions materials required from the school — transcripts, school profiles, and recommendations — were not received by all of the colleges to which our students applied," Principal Alisha Trusty wrote in a letter, posted Friday on the school's website and sent home with students who may have been affected.
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