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By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Knight-Ridder/Tribune News Service | June 4, 1995
Q: How can I find out more about Nippon marked china?A: Write the International Nippon Collectors' Club c/o Phil Fernkes, 112 Oak Ave. North, Owatonna, Minn. 55060. It offers an annual membership and informative bimonthly newsletter for $20. Or call (507) 451-4960 for information.Q: I have a bunch of original McDonald's stir rods from years ago. How can I find out more about them, and where can I take them to sell?A: Send a photocopy of the stirrers (which may be rare) to McDonald Collector, P.O. Box 83, Winnetka, Ill. 60093, enclosing a self-addressed stamped envelope for a reply or cash offer.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | April 25, 2007
Once upon a time, etchings and other prints were the orphan stepchildren of the art world. Serious collectors generally preferred paintings and drawings because each one was unique; Leonardo, after all, painted only one Mona Lisa. Albrecht Durer and Rembrandt van Rijn were among the first artists to raise the genre's status by issuing prints intended to be major artworks in their own right, not just copies of famous paintings. Since then, prints have become a major area of collecting for enthusiasts.
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FEATURES
By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Chicago Tribune | September 6, 1992
Q: Can you tell me anything about the 1992 U.S. Olympics basketball cards and where they can be purchased?A: SkyBox International has released 110 cards, sold in eight-card packs for about $2. Randomly inserted cards include some autographed in gold ink by Magic Johnson or David Robinson, reportedly worth $500 each; the first plastic trading cards with a photo of the U.S. basketball team, worth $50 each; and gold hologram cards with the Olympics basketball logo,...
NEWS
December 22, 2002
`Pick your car' raffle offered by health care planner Catastrophic Health Planners Inc. of Finksburg is holding a "Pick Your Car and Color" raffle to raise money to assist families facing large medical bills. Tickets are $5 and will be sold until the $25,000 fund-raising goal is reached. The winner will receive a pre-owned vehicle valued at $10,000, or $10,000 cash that must be applied toward a new or used vehicle at Heritage of Westminster. Tickets are available at Catastrophic Health Planners, the Finksburg BB&T branch, New York J&P Pizza, Finksburg Liquors, Palette & Page, and Vaughn's Hometown Video.
NEWS
December 22, 2002
`Pick your car' raffle offered by health care planner Catastrophic Health Planners Inc. of Finksburg is holding a "Pick Your Car and Color" raffle to raise money to assist families facing large medical bills. Tickets are $5 and will be sold until the $25,000 fund-raising goal is reached. The winner will receive a pre-owned vehicle valued at $10,000, or $10,000 cash that must be applied toward a new or used vehicle at Heritage of Westminster. Tickets are available at Catastrophic Health Planners, the Finksburg BB&T branch, New York J&P Pizza, Finksburg Liquors, Palette & Page, and Vaughn's Hometown Video.
FEATURES
By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Knight-Ridder/Tribune News Service | July 9, 1995
Q: You are probably no longer surprised at the strange things people collect. Well then, welcome to the Classic Trailer and Motorhome Club! We're a club and archive, which publishes the quarterly Lost Highways magazine, and keeps the Lost Highways Trailer Archives alive and kicking for those who love old motor homes and everything relating to them. If any of your readers are interested, would you please tell them about us?A: To check out any travel trailer, write Todd Kimmell at Classic Trailer and Motorhome Club, P.O. Box 43737, 615 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 19106; include a photo and a self-addressed stamped envelope.
FEATURES
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Evening Sun Staff | July 12, 1991
AUTOGRAPH COLLECTOR Henry Rogers once got a whopper for a birthday present: the signature of former chief justice of the United States Warren Burger, along with a personalized letter."
FEATURES
By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Chicago Tribune | August 4, 1991
Q: I love the little ceramic cottages, houses and shops inspired by Norman Rockwell and Charles Dickens. Are there any collectors groups or publications related to such collectibles?A: Miniature structures inspired by Norman Rockwell's painting "Main Street, Stockbridge" are produced by Rhodes Studio and were authorized by the Norman Rockwell Family Trust. The Main Street miniature buildings, produced as a limited-edition series in 1990 and '91, include Rockwell's studio, an antiques shop, town offices, a country store, a library and a bank.
FEATURES
By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Chicago Tribune | June 16, 1991
Q: When I was a boy, I spent a lot of time behind the counter of my uncle's ice cream store. In my quest to recapture my boyhood, I'm re-creating the past. Where can I find a 1930s milkshake mixer and any other ice cream parlor paraphernalia?A: You can join the Ice Screamers, which offers an annual membership and quarterly publication for $15 from Ed Marks, Box 5387, Lancaster, Pa. 17601. The group's annual convention, on June 28 and 29 at the Olde Hickory Inn in Lancaster, will feature hundreds of ice cream collectibles dating from 1870 to 1940.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Staff Writer | March 1, 1992
The Winter Olympics ended last weekend, and the Summer Games are five months away. But there's still time for collectors to get in shape for the Olympics' most popular sport -- pin collecting.Reports from Albertville, France, indicate that more than 1 million pins were traded by 350,000 people at the official pin centers run by Coca-Cola.For those who couldn't make it to France, the International Pin Collectors Club could be the ticket to beginning or augmenting a collection. It was founded in 1980 and has 2,000 members worldwide.
FEATURES
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 1, 1997
Washington's bottle club has published a list of old bottles that is already in its third edition.The Ohio Bottle Club's book -- oversized -- contains 8,933 listings and is 438 pages thick.Even the Little Rhody Club now has a book out -- "over 1,000 Rhode Island bottles listed."And the Baltimore Antique Bottle Club, founded in 1970?For years, the kind thing has been not to ask. Poor, listless BABC.But all this is about to change."It's a formidable undertaking," says Rick Lease, club president, "but our members are pooling their information, a committee is at work, by late next year we hope to publish a comprehensive, standardized list of the Baltimore area's known old bottles."
FEATURES
By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Knight-Ridder/Tribune News Service | July 9, 1995
Q: You are probably no longer surprised at the strange things people collect. Well then, welcome to the Classic Trailer and Motorhome Club! We're a club and archive, which publishes the quarterly Lost Highways magazine, and keeps the Lost Highways Trailer Archives alive and kicking for those who love old motor homes and everything relating to them. If any of your readers are interested, would you please tell them about us?A: To check out any travel trailer, write Todd Kimmell at Classic Trailer and Motorhome Club, P.O. Box 43737, 615 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 19106; include a photo and a self-addressed stamped envelope.
FEATURES
By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Knight-Ridder/Tribune News Service | June 4, 1995
Q: How can I find out more about Nippon marked china?A: Write the International Nippon Collectors' Club c/o Phil Fernkes, 112 Oak Ave. North, Owatonna, Minn. 55060. It offers an annual membership and informative bimonthly newsletter for $20. Or call (507) 451-4960 for information.Q: I have a bunch of original McDonald's stir rods from years ago. How can I find out more about them, and where can I take them to sell?A: Send a photocopy of the stirrers (which may be rare) to McDonald Collector, P.O. Box 83, Winnetka, Ill. 60093, enclosing a self-addressed stamped envelope for a reply or cash offer.
FEATURES
By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Chicago Tribune | September 6, 1992
Q: Can you tell me anything about the 1992 U.S. Olympics basketball cards and where they can be purchased?A: SkyBox International has released 110 cards, sold in eight-card packs for about $2. Randomly inserted cards include some autographed in gold ink by Magic Johnson or David Robinson, reportedly worth $500 each; the first plastic trading cards with a photo of the U.S. basketball team, worth $50 each; and gold hologram cards with the Olympics basketball logo,...
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,Staff Writer | March 1, 1992
The Winter Olympics ended last weekend, and the Summer Games are five months away. But there's still time for collectors to get in shape for the Olympics' most popular sport -- pin collecting.Reports from Albertville, France, indicate that more than 1 million pins were traded by 350,000 people at the official pin centers run by Coca-Cola.For those who couldn't make it to France, the International Pin Collectors Club could be the ticket to beginning or augmenting a collection. It was founded in 1980 and has 2,000 members worldwide.
FEATURES
By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Chicago Tribune | August 4, 1991
Q: I love the little ceramic cottages, houses and shops inspired by Norman Rockwell and Charles Dickens. Are there any collectors groups or publications related to such collectibles?A: Miniature structures inspired by Norman Rockwell's painting "Main Street, Stockbridge" are produced by Rhodes Studio and were authorized by the Norman Rockwell Family Trust. The Main Street miniature buildings, produced as a limited-edition series in 1990 and '91, include Rockwell's studio, an antiques shop, town offices, a country store, a library and a bank.
SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler | December 30, 1990
Even people who work in sports may not be aware of the existence of sports collectors clubs and societies.Several weeks ago, I received a letter from a Frederick County man who wanted to know whom to contact to get an appraisal for insurance purposes. He has some uncashed winning tickets from Triple Crown races involving Triple Crown winners Seattle Slew and Affirmed and other racing memorabilia.It seemed like an easy request, although all my collecting contacts deal mostly with baseball and football material.
FEATURES
By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Chicago Tribune | April 28, 1991
Q: I have some Planters Peanuts collectibles I would like to sell. Can you give me an address for collectors?A: Write to Carl Schweizer, 831 E. Washington, West Chicago, Ill. 60185, phone (708) 231-2242, enclosing a description of the pieces you have and an addressed, stamped envelope for a reply, appraisal or offer. Mr. Schweizer is looking for 3 1/2 -foot-high Mr. Peanut metal scales from the mid-1950s; people would weigh themselves by inserting a penny in Mr. Peanut's top hat.Collectors of Planters Peanuts memorabilia belong to Peanut Pals, which offers an annual membership and bimonthly newsletter for $15, or $2 for a sample copy, from Peanut Pals, in care of Bob Walthall, Box 4465, Huntsville, Ala. 35815; (205)
FEATURES
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Evening Sun Staff | July 12, 1991
AUTOGRAPH COLLECTOR Henry Rogers once got a whopper for a birthday present: the signature of former chief justice of the United States Warren Burger, along with a personalized letter."
FEATURES
By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Chicago Tribune | June 16, 1991
Q: When I was a boy, I spent a lot of time behind the counter of my uncle's ice cream store. In my quest to recapture my boyhood, I'm re-creating the past. Where can I find a 1930s milkshake mixer and any other ice cream parlor paraphernalia?A: You can join the Ice Screamers, which offers an annual membership and quarterly publication for $15 from Ed Marks, Box 5387, Lancaster, Pa. 17601. The group's annual convention, on June 28 and 29 at the Olde Hickory Inn in Lancaster, will feature hundreds of ice cream collectibles dating from 1870 to 1940.
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