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By Ruth Sadler | June 16, 1991
Some sports collectors save colorful rectangular pieces of paper.But this ephemera is not baseball cards. It's schedule cards.And since pocket-sized cards aren't the only ways schedules come, collections can include postcards, pencils, keychains, matchbooks, cans and posters.According to schedule collector John Drugan of Warren, Mich.: "I overlap with collectors of certain sponsors -- say, Coca Cola -- collectors of brewery-related items and, of course, team memorabilia collectors. In many cases, schedules are overlooked and underpriced.
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NEWS
By Michael Hankin | June 3, 2014
A seemingly endless flow of trash has plagued the Inner Harbor for years, and the problem only gets worse in the aftermath of downpours like the one that washed through the area in early May. Baltimore's hardworking fleet of trash-skimming boats scoops 200 tons of garbage from the harbor every year, but it can barely keep up with the problem. But as 884,409 people (and counting) on the website Reddit can attest, help has arrived. That's how many people viewed a video featuring the city's latest solution.
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FEATURES
By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Chicago Tribune | October 27, 1991
Q: I collect Halloween-related items and would like to know how to contact other collectors.A: Halloween collectors can be contacted through the Trick or Treat Trader, published quarterly for $15 a year or $4 a copy from Box 499, Winchester, N.H. 03470.Q: I collect objects shaped like birds, and my favorites are those with long necks, bizarre beaks and other curious features. How can I learn more about such birds and how to identify peculiar-looking species? Also, where can such birds be found?
NEWS
By Krishana Davis | April 25, 2014
Randy Myers might technically be in the business of selling books, but he says he doesn't fret the impact the Internet or e-readers is having on the business, recently opening his second Collector's Corner comic book shop in February in Harford County. “People want to hold [comics] in their hand,” Myers said. “It's the tactile nature of the comic book that gives it more of a chance at surviving the digital age. It's not just the words, but it's the illustrations.” The shop prides itself on its selection of popular titles, such as the widely known series-turned-hit-TV-show “The Walking Dead,” the classic DC and Marvel Comics brands and small stapled comics from obscure indie brands such as Microcosm Publishing.
FEATURES
By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Chicago Tribune | April 28, 1991
Q: I have some Planters Peanuts collectibles I would like to sell. Can you give me an address for collectors?A: Write to Carl Schweizer, 831 E. Washington, West Chicago, Ill. 60185, phone (708) 231-2242, enclosing a description of the pieces you have and an addressed, stamped envelope for a reply, appraisal or offer. Mr. Schweizer is looking for 3 1/2 -foot-high Mr. Peanut metal scales from the mid-1950s; people would weigh themselves by inserting a penny in Mr. Peanut's top hat.Collectors of Planters Peanuts memorabilia belong to Peanut Pals, which offers an annual membership and bimonthly newsletter for $15, or $2 for a sample copy, from Peanut Pals, in care of Bob Walthall, Box 4465, Huntsville, Ala. 35815; (205)
NEWS
By Photos by Kenneth K. Lam and Photos by Kenneth K. Lam,Sun photographer | February 4, 2008
Philatelists and numismatists - stamp and coin collectors for those who aren't in the know - gathered at a recent collectors show in Timonium. Enthusiasts searched through stamps, coins and currency that spanned hundreds of years of history. About a dozen dealers displayed their wares at the gathering, which happens once a month at the Holiday Inn Select.
FEATURES
By Anne McCollam and Anne McCollam,Copley News Service | September 4, 1994
Q: I have an extensive collection of Disneyana that includes original cels, plates and limited editions. How do I go about reaching Disney collectors?A: Collectors interested in selling their collections should refer to "Collector's Information Clearinghouse, Antiques & Collectibles Resource Directory" by David Maloney.Q: I have a Raggedy Ann doll that I was given around 1967. She is wearing her original clothes. A label that says "Knickerbocker" is attached to her. Could you tell me her value?
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Sun Staff Writer | September 5, 1995
As Cal Ripken methodically has added game after game to his historic playing streak, a flock of aggressive collectors has gobbled up Ripken memorabilia like sea gulls swooping in for french fries on the boardwalk.The collectors have devoured anything -- and everything -- from the ever-expanding, ever-more-costly mountain of memorabilia."It's like a frenzy," said Chuck Williams, a Ripken-memorabilia collector and surety-bond underwriter who lives in Philadelphia. "Anything associated with that man is gold.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2013
History's throwaways and discards emerged as coveted attractions Sunday when bottles, vials and flasks that spent decades buried in dumps and privies returned in translucent glory. Billed as the "largest one-day bottle show in the world," the Baltimore Bottle Club's 33rd annual sale and exhibit, held in Essex, drew container connoisseurs who didn't flip a cork over paying $750 for a rare cobalt-blue poison bottle produced at Carr-Lowrey, a factory on the Middle Branch of the Patapsco in Westport.
NEWS
November 11, 2000
An article about collectors of Election Day newspapers in yesterday's Today section misquoted collector Rick Brown as saying that the Declaration of Independence was signed on Sept. 17, 1787. Mr. Brown had correctly said that the Constitution was signed on that date. The Sun regrets the error.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2014
Mera Rubell - a 70-year-old formerly penniless Jewish Russian refugee turned Head Start teacher turned hotel mogul turned art collector extraordinaire - is the kind of person who just naturally acquires an entourage. For example, a recent tour of Baltimore's art scene began quietly at 8:40 a.m. with just one car and six sleepy occupants. Eight hours later, the caravan that pulled up outside the Charles Village home of paper artist Cara Ober had grown to three vehicles containing at least 14 people, including four reporters and photographers.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
During a dark time in her life, Baltimore artist Meg Page sought solace by a pond and took the time to look into the eyes of nature. "There was this frog, and the specks of gold in his eyes were so spectacular that my heart lifted in the moment," she said. Also in that moment, nature changed from being her comforter to being her muse, and almost 20 years ago, the career of one of the country's great naturalist illustrators was launched. "It's all right here for us, this beauty.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | September 25, 2013
The Federal Trade Commission brought its first case against a California debt collector that allegedly sent text messages to consumers. Nothing wrong with that, but the debt collector didn't let on that it was debt collector, the agency said. Additionally, the debt collector pretended it was a law firm, and threatened to sue consumers for unpaid debts or to garnish their wages, the FTC said. The agency charged that Archie Donovan and his two companies, National Attorney Collection Services and National Attorney Services violated the Fair Debt Collection Protection Act, illegally revealing debts to the consumers' relatives and co-workers.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2013
A member of a trash collection crew was struck on Tuesday morning while crossing Reisterstown Road in Owings Mills and has been transported to Maryland Shock Trauma with life-threatening injuries, according to Baltimore County Police. Police spokesman Cpl. John Wachter said that at 6:24 a.m. police and fire personnel responded to a report of a male pedestrian believed to be in his 50s struck at the 11400 block of Reisterstown Road. The initial investigation, Wachter said, indicated that the man was crossing Reisterstown Road when he was struck by a Toyota Highlander that had been traveling southbound.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2013
He leans forward at the desk in his cluttered study, fanning out three baseball cards like a man unveiling the winning hand in a poker game. The faces are in black and white, the subjects in bow ties and upturned mustaches. The names - Gleason, Hemming, Reitz - would mean little to most modern fans. Yet the players belonged to perhaps the greatest team in local baseball history, the cards to a set so rare that owning them changed Dan McKee's life. He sold them for six figures in 2006, earning enough on the deal to purchase his family's dream home in northern Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2013
A ring once owned by Adolf Hitler fetched $65,725 at an auction in Cecil County Tuesday. Alexander Historical Auctions sold the silver ring, which is plated in gold and features a ruby-encrusted swastika on its base. The business has previously sold Nazi memorabilia, including a desk belonging to Hitler. "We are very happy with the result," Andreas Kornfeld, vice president of international client relations for the auction house, said in an email. "It is very difficult to estimate objects and relics such as the ring, since there are, or have been, no comparisons on the market.
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen and Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen,Contributing Writers | September 5, 1993
With Labor Day's arrival, folks are returning home from vacation, schools and offices are moving back into high gear, and thoughts are turning from sunburns to burning the midnight oil. Those not content with ordinary lighting increasingly are looking for lamps with age and character: lamps that can light up a room in more ways than one.People are searching attics, flea markets and dealers' shops for vintage lighting devices, and discovering that there were...
FEATURES
By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Knight-Ridder/Tribune News Service | April 9, 1995
Q: I have a set of three cast Pennzoil owls -- a mama owl andtwo baby owls along her side, which I believe are made of copper. Where can I possibly find interested collectors?A: Those who give a hoot can be found listed in wanted ads in Check the Oil, the monthly magazine of the International Petroliana Collectors' Association, which is loaded with gas station collectibles and memories of the old-time filling stations. It's available with an I.P.C.A. membership for $29 a year first class, or $20 a year second class, or $4 for an issue, from Check the Oil, P.O. Box 937, Powell, Ohio 43065-0937.
SPORTS
By Ellen Fishel, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2013
Henry Stansbury is pure Maryland. His family has been here since the 1650s. He grew up in Mount Washington, played lacrosse for the Terps in the early 1960s and now splits his time between his houses in Catonsville and on the Eastern Shore. And his love for the state and its history also led him to one of his greatest passions - decoy collecting. Hand-carved decoys, once used for waterfowl hunting and now appreciated as art, have a rich history in the Chesapeake Bay region.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2013
James L. Akers Jr., a retired financial analyst and businessman who collected and restored vintage arcade machines, died Wednesday of kidney cancer at his Ellicott City home. He was 73. The son of a dentist and a homemaker, James Lee Akers Jr. was born in Baltimore and raised on Regester Avenue in Stoneleigh. Herbert W. Dorsey grew up a few doors away, and they remained lifelong friends. "It was a neighborhood of boys, and we naturally gravitated to his home because Jim had a pool table," said Mr. Dorsey, a retired Public Health Service officer who lives in Bethesda.
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