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Collective Bargaining Agreement

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By Peter Schmuck and Mark Hyman and Peter Schmuck and Mark Hyman,Staff Writers | February 18, 1993
The gates will be unlocked today when Orioles pitchers and catchers report to Twin Lakes Park in Sarasota, Fla., in preparation for tomorrow's first official workout of the spring. All 28 training camps will be open for business, though there was room to wonder after the owners voted in December to reopen Major League Baseball's collective bargaining agreement.NBA: Salary cap is 53 percent of designated team revenues.
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By RICK MAESE and RICK MAESE,rick.maese@baltsun.com | January 31, 2009
TAMPA, Fla. - With all due respect to the many Pittsburgh Steelers fans clogging every thoroughfare and restaurant within 50 miles of Raymond James Stadium ... and to that single Arizona Cardinals fan who has been wandering the streets, seemingly lost and still stunned that his team is playing in the Super Bowl ... and to the corporate suits who overpaid for their tents, suites and seats here - tomorrow's matchup is about as exciting as a Fran Drescher...
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By Newsday | March 25, 1992
Small groups representing the NHL Players Association and the owners met for 4 1/2 hours in Toronto yesterday in an effort to reach a new collective bargaining agreement.The discussions, which were said to be amicable, ended at 7:30 p.m. Neither side would discuss any details, except to say they will meet again today. "Because of the work that's going on and how we're going about it," NHL president John Ziegler said, "it's best that we have no comment."
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By KEN MURRAY and KEN MURRAY,SUN REPORTER | July 2, 2006
During 14 years in the NFL, Dick "Night Train" Lane was celebrated for his vicious clothesline hits, his technical skill on the defensive perimeter and his fast-paced lifestyle off it. Few players were bigger in stature - or better at their job - than the Hall of Fame defensive back with the alluring moniker who intimidated receivers from 1952 to 1965. "Train was kind of in the show-business atmosphere," said Lenny Moore, a longtime friend and on-field foe. "He married the great [jazz singer]
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By SportsTicker | March 2, 1995
The NHL announced yesterday that the entry draft will be held July 8 in Winnipeg, Manitoba.According to the new collective bargaining agreement, the draft has been reduced from 11 to nine rounds. It will also include a compensatory round for teams that have lost free agents.The eligiblilty age has been raised from 18 to 19, but 18-year-olds will have the option to opt into the draft. The opt-in rules and deadlines have not been made final.
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By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 21, 2003
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- A 21-year-old policy in the NFL's collective bargaining agreement limits players' access to medical and training records. Players are not allowed to see their records kept by their teams during the 17-week regular season -- when games are played and injuries are prevalent. Player access to their records is granted twice a year, once during the preseason and again after the regular season. Critics say the policy violates the civil -- and perhaps legal -- rights of players and gives teams too much control over health information that should be shared, not shielded.
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August 10, 1991
Crunch matches Blast offer for KingThe Baltimore Blast's attempts to sign Cleveland Crunch forward Michael King were stalled yesterday when the Crunch matched Baltimore's contract offer of approximately $45,000, enabling Cleveland to retain the rights to King under the Major Soccer League collective bargaining agreement.Blast general manager John Borozzi said yesterday that the team was considering other options to obtain King, including a trade in the next seven to 10 days. Borozzi said King might become a free agent when a new collective bargaining agreement is finalized.
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By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,Sun Staff Writer | June 15, 1995
HOUSTON -- Calling a potential work stoppage in the NBA "very dangerous, and something we very much want to avoid," commissioner David Stern said last night that talks between the players' association and team owners will result in a new collective bargaining agreement, possibly as soon as next week.There have been reports that the owners would lock out the players after the end of the season, with a rookie salary cap and increased merchandising revenue for players key issues. But Stern said that around-the-clock negotiations over the past three days make such a scenario improbable.
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By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | February 9, 1996
CHICAGO -- For a wheeler-dealer like Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones, $2 million is not usually a large sum of money.Except, that is, when the NFL owners are asking him to pay it into a revenue-sharing fund.The owners spent much of their meeting time yesterday debating a modest revenue-sharing proposal that would create a fund ranging from $6 to $18 million. The richer teams would pay into the fund to help the low-revenue teams.Although the details were still being debated, Jones might have to pay no more than $2 million into the fund.
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By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | October 29, 2001
PHOENIX - Baseball commissioner Bud Selig repeated yesterday that "all options are on the table" in the industry's attempt to achieve economic balance, and refused to rule out the dissolution of one or two teams before the start of the 2002 season. "Can it be worked out for 2002?" Selig said. "I can't tell you. I wouldn't rule it out." Ownership officials have been floating the idea of contraction as a possible solution to the large- market/small-market quandary that has troubled Major League Baseball for the past couple of decades, but it could only be accomplished in time for next season if management can cut a side deal with the Major League Baseball Players Association before full-scale bargaining begins on a new labor agreement.
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By KEN MURRAY and KEN MURRAY,SUN REPORTER | March 21, 2006
Under Paul Tagliabue, the National Football League experienced unparalleled growth and unimagined popularity. The commissioner with the dour expression and legal background built stadiums as well as labor peace over the past 16 seasons. But in Baltimore, he will be remembered as the Washington lawyer who rejected this city's expansion application in the early 1990s, smugly inviting it to build a museum instead of a football stadium. Tagliabue, 65, announced yesterday that he will step down in July as commissioner of the nation's most popular sport.
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By KEN MURRAY and KEN MURRAY,SUN REPORTER | February 7, 2006
If battle lines were drawn in the NFL's latest scuffle with its players union, those lines would look more like a triangle than trench warfare. You've got high-rolling landlords in one corner, small-market owners in another and a group of anxious players pondering the complexity of it all. It's not quite a free-for-all, but negotiations over a new collective bargaining agreement may require a roster and a road map. Here's why: The players, under the...
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By PETER SCHMUCK | December 5, 2005
My mother taught me never to turn my nose up at a win - even if it's against the Houston Texans. I'm guessing Brian Billick lives by a similar credo, though he has to know that yesterday's 16-15 victory at M&T Bank Stadium left Ravens fans feeling about as empty as an Orioles promise. The Ravens needed to pound the lowly Texans like a cheap piece of flank steak just to get everyone to tune in for next week's game against the Denver Broncos (which apparently won't be pretty). Instead, they ran for just 73 yards against a rushing defense ranked last in the NFL and were able to work a little last-minute magic only because of a fluke play that accounted for their first defensive touchdown of the year.
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April 21, 2005
Wygod retires Sweet Catomine Sweet Catomine, last year's champion 2-year-old filly, has been retired less than two weeks after her fifth-place finish in the Santa Anita Derby triggered controversy about her physical condition. Owner Martin Wygod said yesterday he had Sweet Catomine evaluated by a veterinarian when he fired trainer Julio Canani and transferred her to the barn of John Shirreffs. Based on the vet's opinion, Wygod decided to retire the filly and breed her to A.P. Indy. Wygod declined to be specific about the vet's recommendation.
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By Michael Russo and Michael Russo,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | February 20, 2005
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - Yesterday was Groundhog Day in the NHL, and in a facsimile of Wednesday, there was no progress to report and the 2004-05 season remained ... canceled. Proving untrue the old adage, "Any PR is good PR," the NHL and its players association looked foolish yesterday when one day after it appeared there would be an unexpected "un-canceling" of the season, even the Great One and Super Mario weren't enough to bridge the gap toward a new collective bargaining agreement.
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By Ed Waldman and Ed Waldman,SUN STAFF | September 16, 2004
So, the National Hockey League's moronic players and equally moronic owners really did it. The owners have locked out the players, claiming they can't operate under the terms of the collective bargaining agreement that expired yesterday. The collective bargaining agreement, by the way, was forged in 1995 after the owners locked out the players for 105 days and canceled more than half of the 1994-95 season. That agreement had been renewed twice. Now, the owners in a sport that is struggling mightily to keep its status as "major league" have threatened to shut the game down for as long as it takes - the over-under seems to be the whole 2004-05 season - to get a collective bargaining agreement that gives them "cost certainty" (standard sports owner code for salary cap)
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By Jason LaCanfora and Jason LaCanfora,SUN STAFF | October 26, 1996
The pending collective bargaining agreement in baseball could have a negative effect on the Orioles' bullpen next season.Left-handed setup man Jesse Orosco has solidified the Orioles' relief corps the last two seasons, and the team has made no secret of its desire to bring the 39-year-old reliever back next year.But according to Orosco's agent, Alan Meersand, the Orioles might have some competition for the veteran if a new collective bargaining agreement is signed.Meersand said under the proposed CBA, the Orioles would lose their repeater rights to Orosco, making him a free agent eligible to negotiate with any team.
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By Ken Murray | October 18, 1990
CHICAGO-- FOR BALTIMORE and all the other aspiring expansion cities around the country, there are new reasons today to wonder if the NFL ever will add more teams.Like the rising cost of gas.Like the crisis in the Middle East.Like the ever-cautious attitudes of the bottom-line owners.There were red flags galore at the two-day fall owners meeting this week. At least a few owners openly questioned the wisdom of expanding in today's economy, with today's unique problems. One privately hinted expansion was not close.
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By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2004
Major League Baseball's owners will convene in Philadelphia today for two days of meetings that will culminate with a coronation of sorts. And Orioles fans can relax. This won't involve an announcement about the Montreal Expos moving to Washington, Northern Virginia or anywhere else, for that matter. The Expos will be discussed, but their new home won't be decided. The coronation is for none other than Allan H. "Bud" Selig. Last year, in a meeting with the Associated Press Sports Editors, Selig said he planned to step aside when his current term expires on Dec. 31, 2006.
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By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2004
PHILADELPHIA - In a surprising turn of events, there is a growing feeling that Terrell Owens' trade to the Ravens will be rescinded if a settlement between the NFL and the players union can't be reached, a source close to the arbitration hearing said last night. The lawyers for the NFL Players Association presented an unexpectedly strong case yesterday to support the Pro Bowl receiver's claim that he voided his contract with the San Francisco 49ers in time and should become a free agent.
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