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NEWS
July 28, 1994
The Sykesville Recycling Committee will present its curbside recycling proposal at the Aug. 8 Town Council meeting."We plan to continue with our curbside recycling plans and stay at twice-weekly trash pickup," said Councilwoman Julie A. Kaus, who chairs the committee.Ms. Kaus said she has received many positive comments on the proposal, which will be available to town residents only.Plans call for a twice-monthly collection of recyclables. Haulers will pick up the recyclables from half the town on alternate Wednesdays.
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NEWS
January 13, 1996
Baltimore and Baltimore County announced yesterday resumption of trash collections on modified schedules:* In the city, trash collection on the normal schedule will resume today on main routes and accessible secondary roads. The city's pickup of recyclable materials also will resume on the normal schedule.* In Baltimore County, the normal schedules will be followed, but residents there whose trash normally is picked up in alleys will need to place their containers in front of their houses.
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NEWS
January 13, 1996
Baltimore and Baltimore County announced yesterday resumption of trash collections on modified schedules:* In the city, trash collection on the normal schedule will resume today on main routes and accessible secondary roads. The city's pickup of recyclable materials also will resume on the normal schedule.* In Baltimore County, the normal schedules will be followed, but residents there whose trash normally is picked up in alleys will need to place their containers in front of their houses.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | June 16, 1995
Curbside recycling has become too much of a good thing in Sykesville. Participation has increased so much that it may end a four-year partnership between the town and its recycling contractor.Mark Billet, owner of Sykesville Recycling Center, told the Town Council Monday that sharp increases in handling costs have made the operation unprofitable. He will not renew his contract when it expires June 30, he said."Curbside recycling is killing us," Mr. Billet said. "Shipping and handling costs are so high that I can't get any money for most items."
NEWS
By Harold Jackson and Harold Jackson,Sun Staff Writer | February 3, 1995
Garbage day will change for 50,000 city households next month when the pickup day for recyclables moves earlier in the week.Public Works Director George G. Balog said that picking up recyclables on the first trash collection day of each week will reduce staff and equipment needs by 30 percent.The change, which will begin March 6 in 70 neighborhoods, is part of the reorganization of the Bureau of Solid Waste.Distribution of new recycling schedules to all 233,000 households served by city is under way.Changing the pickup schedule will ensure the weekly collection of recyclables even during holidays, Mr. Balog said.
NEWS
May 15, 1992
Two months ago, Baltimore City altered its garbage collection routine. One of the two weekly general pickups was replaced with a recyclable material pickup day. Mixed paper is collected one week; glass, metal and plastic containers stuffed into blue plastic bags are collected the next.During the first two weeks of May, 294 tons of mixed paper and nearly 94 tons of glass, metal and plastic containers were collected. The amount of paper gathered during that time period translates into saving 4,994 trees, according to Kenneth J. Strong, the city's recycling coordinator.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Evening Sun Staff | September 11, 1991
While many Maryland recycling centers are jammed with eager residents, local governments say recycling programs will be expensive and difficult to operate unless the state helps create markets for the growing volume of reusable trash."
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Evening Sun Staff | November 6, 1990
Heather Dresbach tossed an empty soda bottle into the trash Sunday."I said, 'No,' " her mother, Nancy, recalled yesterday. For the Dresbach family on Rosalie Avenue in northeast Baltimore, and about 20,000 other families in the city, used soda bottles, milk jugs and other recyclables no longer are to be considered castaways bound for the dump.Yesterday marked the start of Baltimore's large-scale curbside recycling effort, at 1,700 homes in certain northeast and north-central neighborhoods.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | June 16, 1995
Curbside recycling has become too much of a good thing in Sykesville. Participation has increased so much that it may end a four-year partnership between the town and its recycling contractor.Mark Billet, owner of Sykesville Recycling Center, told the Town Council Monday that sharp increases in handling costs have made the operation unprofitable. He will not renew his contract when it expires June 30, he said."Curbside recycling is killing us," Mr. Billet said. "Shipping and handling costs are so high that I can't get any money for most items."
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Evening Sun Staff | January 16, 1992
Harford County has become the final Maryland jurisdiction to approve a state-mandated plan for trash recycling.At the same time, county officials are asking private haulers to encourage residents to recycle by offering economic incentives."
NEWS
By Harold Jackson and Harold Jackson,Sun Staff Writer | February 3, 1995
Garbage day will change for 50,000 city households next month when the pickup day for recyclables moves earlier in the week.Public Works Director George G. Balog said that picking up recyclables on the first trash collection day of each week will reduce staff and equipment needs by 30 percent.The change, which will begin March 6 in 70 neighborhoods, is part of the reorganization of the Bureau of Solid Waste.Distribution of new recycling schedules to all 233,000 households served by city is under way.Changing the pickup schedule will ensure the weekly collection of recyclables even during holidays, Mr. Balog said.
NEWS
July 28, 1994
The Sykesville Recycling Committee will present its curbside recycling proposal at the Aug. 8 Town Council meeting."We plan to continue with our curbside recycling plans and stay at twice-weekly trash pickup," said Councilwoman Julie A. Kaus, who chairs the committee.Ms. Kaus said she has received many positive comments on the proposal, which will be available to town residents only.Plans call for a twice-monthly collection of recyclables. Haulers will pick up the recyclables from half the town on alternate Wednesdays.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | May 24, 1992
The county commissioners unanimously adopted a solid waste ordinance Thursday that compels trash haulers to offer curbside recycling to Carroll customers, but does not require residents to recycle.The adoption culminates five months of debate over how to establish a cost-effective and efficient recycling program to comply with state law mandating that Carroll recycle a minimum of 15 percent of its waste by 1994.The now-defunct Recycling Committee recommended requiring recycling and hiring one trash hauler to provide curbside collection of recyclables in Carroll's eight municipalities and the unincorporated areas.
NEWS
May 15, 1992
Two months ago, Baltimore City altered its garbage collection routine. One of the two weekly general pickups was replaced with a recyclable material pickup day. Mixed paper is collected one week; glass, metal and plastic containers stuffed into blue plastic bags are collected the next.During the first two weeks of May, 294 tons of mixed paper and nearly 94 tons of glass, metal and plastic containers were collected. The amount of paper gathered during that time period translates into saving 4,994 trees, according to Kenneth J. Strong, the city's recycling coordinator.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Evening Sun Staff | January 16, 1992
Harford County has become the final Maryland jurisdiction to approve a state-mandated plan for trash recycling.At the same time, county officials are asking private haulers to encourage residents to recycle by offering economic incentives."
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Evening Sun Staff | September 11, 1991
While many Maryland recycling centers are jammed with eager residents, local governments say recycling programs will be expensive and difficult to operate unless the state helps create markets for the growing volume of reusable trash."
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Evening Sun Staff | August 16, 1991
Harford County Executive Eileen M. Rehrmann's administration is gearing up for a broad-based educational campaign aimed at getting the county's 63,000 households recycling their trash by early next year.Judy Scotten, Harford's recycling coordinator, is proposing a "network" of volunteers from community groups, schools, businesses and county offices to help promote recycling. "If the citizenry doesn't feel a part of it, you're in trouble," she said.The county also may try to recruit large corporations to help pay the cost of the educational campaign, Scotten and other officials said.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | May 24, 1992
The county commissioners unanimously adopted a solid waste ordinance Thursday that compels trash haulers to offer curbside recycling to Carroll customers, but does not require residents to recycle.The adoption culminates five months of debate over how to establish a cost-effective and efficient recycling program to comply with state law mandating that Carroll recycle a minimum of 15 percent of its waste by 1994.The now-defunct Recycling Committee recommended requiring recycling and hiring one trash hauler to provide curbside collection of recyclables in Carroll's eight municipalities and the unincorporated areas.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Evening Sun Staff | August 16, 1991
Harford County Executive Eileen M. Rehrmann's administration is gearing up for a broad-based educational campaign aimed at getting the county's 63,000 households recycling their trash by early next year.Judy Scotten, Harford's recycling coordinator, is proposing a "network" of volunteers from community groups, schools, businesses and county offices to help promote recycling. "If the citizenry doesn't feel a part of it, you're in trouble," she said.The county also may try to recruit large corporations to help pay the cost of the educational campaign, Scotten and other officials said.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Evening Sun Staff | November 6, 1990
Heather Dresbach tossed an empty soda bottle into the trash Sunday."I said, 'No,' " her mother, Nancy, recalled yesterday. For the Dresbach family on Rosalie Avenue in northeast Baltimore, and about 20,000 other families in the city, used soda bottles, milk jugs and other recyclables no longer are to be considered castaways bound for the dump.Yesterday marked the start of Baltimore's large-scale curbside recycling effort, at 1,700 homes in certain northeast and north-central neighborhoods.
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