Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCollecting
IN THE NEWS

Collecting

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 8, 2011
Gail Householder writes on July 6th that "forcing state employees to pay union dues ... (is) unconstitutional. " Ms. Householder needed to check her facts: while she may disagree with the decision, the Supreme Court has upheld the right of unions to collect fees from nonmembers and gives quite valid reasons for doing so. One of those reasons has to do with the union representing all employees during collective bargaining procedures. In other words, those non union members end up benefiting from the union's actions and, therefore, can be required to contribute financially to the union since the majority of the employees selected that union to represent them.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
Maryland consumers who shop online at Amazon.com after Tuesday will be paying more — 6 percent of the sale. Yet most shoppers will click "place your order" anyway. The world's largest online retailer will begin collecting Maryland's sales tax as it prepares to start operations of a massive new distribution center next spring in Southeast Baltimore, where it expects to hire more than 1,000 workers. It has already hired part-time and seasonal workers to staff a smaller "sortation" center nearby that will open this fall.
Advertisement
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 2, 1996
Would-be travelers received a New Year's bonus yesterday when several more airlines stopped collecting a federal excise tax, slashing the cost of domestic air tickets by 10 percent at a time when some prices were already lower because of a winter fare war.But travel industry officials urged people to move quickly to take advantage of the savings, since Congress is expected to reinstate the tax, which expired on New Year's Eve. The tax, along with a $6...
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Continuing Maryland's push to stem drug abuse, officials sought Wednesday to refocus the annual prescription "take-back" day on treatment and prevention and away from law enforcement. The nationwide take-back day — which is Saturday — has traditionally been used by its sponsors at the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration to collect expired or unneeded prescription drugs that could be abused if left in family medicine cabinets, or could poison children or pollute the environment.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | July 14, 1991
Uncle Sam has gotten much better at collecting the taxes we owe. But better isn't good enough, says a General Accounting Office report.The IRS pulled in about $1 trillion in 1989. But as of Sept. 30, 1990, taxpayers still owed about $72.2 billion, plus an additional $24 billion in interest and penalties.In 1983, the IRS introduced an automated collection system, which uses phones and computers to settle claims. It replaced a manual system that depended on written notices.The system worked so well that 21 ACS centers now do the work of 73 manual offices with half as many people.
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen and Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen,Contributing Writers | June 6, 1993
The most successful collectors aren't trendy. They seek no approval except their own and keep quiet about what they're buying to have the field all to themselves. Then, a decade ormore later, when they show off their accumulated treasures, latecomers gaze enviously. "Why didn't I think of collecting that way back when it was cheap and plentiful?" is the common refrain.One trick to building a collection that can be savored privately, exhibited publicly or, if you're lucky, sold for a handsome profit, is to find a neglected field.
BUSINESS
June 1, 2003
Dear Mr. Azrael: Twenty-five years ago, I inherited six ground rents and wish I hadn't. I billed the people two weeks prior to the due date of the rent and the checks would come in with no trouble. Now I am experiencing huge problems collecting these rents. It seems houses are being sold without informing the owner of the ground rent. I recently was able to trace a rent to the Department of Housing and Urban Development in Huntington Beach, Calif. Last December, I sent three bills to a real estate firm.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2003
Jacqueline Lanier, who spent a lifetime gathering African-American artifacts and collectibles she displayed and exhibited to schoolchildren, died of a respiratory ailment Wednesday at her Walbrook Junction home. She was 55. Born Jacqueline Ruth Lanier in Roxbury, Mass., she moved to Baltimore in 1954 and was a 1965 graduate of Carver Vocational-Technical High School. As a teen, she taught dance at Lafayette Courts Recreation Center and was an assistant coach of synchronized swimming at the Chick Webb Recreation Center in East Baltimore.
NEWS
By Debra Taylor Young and Debra Taylor Young,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 9, 2001
TIFFANY REINHARDT, 17, a senior at Liberty High School, was like many Americans who watched the tragic events of Sept. 11 unfold, and through their shock and sorrow, felt the need to help in any way they could. That evening, Tiffany sat with her parents, Rodney and Sharon Harrison, and sister Ashley Harrison, 10. As the television replayed the devastation of the World Trade Center towers' collapses in New York, and the images of the crash sites at the Pentagon and Flight 93 in Pennsylvania, the family planned a way to help.
BUSINESS
By Michelle Singletary and Michelle Singletary,Evening Sun Staff | January 14, 1991
Sam Cooperman has run his family business for 15 years. Now, instead of spending more time on selling doors, windows and skylights, the Baltimore building supplier has to worry about bill collecting."
NEWS
By Erin Cox and Michael Dresser and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan got a helping hand Wednesday from one of his party's best-known figures as New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie came to Maryland to raise money for the GOP. Christie, chair of the Republican Governors Association, arrived at a lunchtime fundraiser at a Bethesda restaurant to benefit Hogan and said the race's changing dynamics brought him to Maryland. "This race is closing, and that's why I'm here," Christie said. "In the beginning, it didn't look like a race that was going to be tight, but it is tight now. That's why I'm here, and that's why the RGA is going to be here to help him because we think he's got a good chance here.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Richard William Parsons, a retired Baltimore County librarian who also spent nearly 50 years as a residential advocate for Towson, died of cancer Monday at his Woodbine Avenue home. He was 87. Born in Victoria, British Columbia, he was the son of Thomas Parsons, a commandant of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and Laura Lyons, a homemaker. He earned a bachelor's degree in Slavic languages at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver and had a master's degree in library science from McGill University.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John-John Williams IV and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
When she returns to Baltimore, Zoey Washington walks the streets with relative anonymity. She'll pop into local boutiques unnoticed. This isn't the reception you would expect for a woman who founded a nationally recognized styling collective, LittleBird, focused on the teen and tween demographic, and who has held editing positions with some of the world's best-known glossies. Washington, a 31-year-old graduate of Garrison Forest School and Columbia University, prefers it that way. But Washington's resume reads like a who's who of fashion elite: She's held positions at Marie Claire, Vogue and Essence.
FEATURES
By Donna M. Owens and For The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
When models strut down the outdoor catwalk at The Village of Cross Keys' annual One Great Fall fashion show on Sept. 20, the sartorial showcase will be about more than hemlines and high heels. Cross Keys, an upscale enclave of residences, boutiques and cafes in North Baltimore, will utilize the occasion to benefit the House of Ruth Maryland Inc., which provides services aimed at domestic violence victims. While the glamour and beauty of fashion may seem incompatible with the ugly and violent behavior of domestic abuse, organizers are billing the event as one that, ultimately, empowers women.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
Veteran defense attorney Russell A. Neverdon Sr. has lost another battle in his effort to get his name on the November ballot as a candidate for Baltimore state's attorney. Baltimore Circuit Judge Martin P. Welch ruled against Neverdon on Tuesday in Neverdon's appeal of a ruling by city elections officials denying him a place on the ballot. Elections officials found that he had fallen more than 1,000 signatures short of the 4,160 that he needed to challenge Democrat Marilyn Mosby as an independent candidate.
NEWS
By Gary Sullivan | August 27, 2014
Countless sailors, soldiers, airmen and Marines, along with civilian specialists, have passed through the heavily guarded gates of the National Security Agency just down the pike from Baltimore in the world's safest suburb - Fort Meade. I served in the Naval Security Group back in the seventies, when NSA stood for "No Such Agency. " The Cold War. The good old days. Moral clarity. Secrets generally stayed secret, give or take an occasional heart-stopping front page article in the New York Times.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,Staff Writer | May 28, 1993
Nine hundred twenty three thousand, nine hundred twenty three thousand one, nine hundred twenty three thousand two . . . nine hundred twenty three thousand fifty three."
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | October 24, 1993
When a part-time volunteer in Baltimore County's Office of Law collected an overdue $76,951 debt with a couple of phone calls, he wrote to County Executive Roger B. Hayden about his success, and eyes in county government began to open.Retired but hardly retiring, William A. Spiegel claimed that Baltimore County was letting tens of thousands of dollars from overdue bills slip through its fingers and that the overburdened county law office was letting it happen.He wanted Mr. Hayden to hire someone, maybe even Mr. Spiegel, to be a full-time bill collector, claiming that he had brought in more than $241,000 in seven months of volunteering 10 hours a week.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2014
NASA's Messenger spacecraft has swung around its namesake planet for three years, beaming observations of Mercury back to Earth, but next March it will smash into the cratered surface it has been studying from afar. The satellite's oblong orbit around the solar system's innermost planet brings it gradually closer and closer as it looks into Mercury's mysterious volcanoes, craters and magnetic field. With dwindling fuel to counteract the dense planet's pull, the scientists managing the mission at Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel can only delay its fall for so long.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Old photographs, newspapers and other miscellaneous "gay pride ephemera" from the last half-century of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender history in Baltimore will be added on Tuesday to one of the nation's most esteemed museum collections. Officials at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History will accept the archival materials from the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center of Baltimore (GLCCB), and add them to its growing collection of items documenting LGBT history.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.