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By SUSAN BONDY | April 28, 1996
When you borrow money using stocks or bonds as collateral, what are the pay-back rules?The answer depends on who is lending you the money:If you use your stocks or bonds as collateral for a bank loan, the bank will define the interest and repayment terms.Some corporations have set up profit-sharing programs that allow employees to borrow against their stocks. Here again, the employer or plan sponsor sets the terms for repayment.If you use a margin account at a brokerage firm, the terms are the most flexible.
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SPORTS
December 24, 2012
Boston Celtics forward-center Chris Wilcox will miss a month because of an ulnar collateral ligament sprain in his right thumb, coach Doc Rivers said, according to ESPN.com. Wilcox, 30, who played on Maryland's 2001-02 national championship team, injured his thumb Tuesday against the Bulls and had sat out the past two games. "Chris is out; he's out for a while," Rivers said Sunday. "I don't know how long, but the first report I got was three to four weeks. " Wilcox is averaging 4.7 points and 2.3 rebounds in 13.3¿minutes per game.
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NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,robert.little@baltsun.com | September 19, 2008
Every one of Constellation Energy Group's 1.1 million electric utility customers can relate to the crisis that forced the company into a shotgun takeover yesterday. Essentially, Wall Street threatened to shut off the power. More precisely, the national rating agencies threatened to cut off the company's credit. And without credit, Constellation was on the brink of losing what it needs to keep nearly all of its multibillion-dollar operation turned on and energized. It was a dilemma common to Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc., AIG Inc. and other financial implosions of recent days.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2012
The Orioles will be without left-hander Randy Wolf for the remainder of the season. Wolf was placed on the 60-day disabled with a tear in the ulnar collateral ligament in his left elbow before Wednesday's game. The 36-year-old Wolf will likely need a second Tommy John surgery to pitch again. The prognosis on Wolf, who was signed Aug. 31 to add left-handed bullpen depth, didn't appear to be promising Tuesday when manager Buck Showalter wouldn't discuss the results of an MRI performed that morning, only saying that Wolf would speak with team orthopedist Dr. John Wilckens and Dr. Lewis Yocum, who performed Tommy John surgery on Wolf's elbow in 2005.  “We'll see what Randy and the doctors want to do,” Showalter said before Wednesday's game.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | October 2, 2002
The now-defunct California Power Exchange will return a portion of millions of dollars in collateral that Constellation Energy Group Inc. was required to post in late 2000 and in 2001 to participate in the state's electricity trading market, federal regulators have ruled. In response to a request filed by Constellation a month after the power exchange folded in January, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has directed CalPX to release two of the three letters of credit that Constellation had provided.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | August 13, 2008
Shares of Constellation Energy Group fell 16 percent yesterday - the largest one-day drop in seven years - after one analyst questioned the company's accounting and another raised concerns about the effects of a potential credit downgrade. The stock closed down $11.79 to $61.25 on the New York Stock Exchange. It was the biggest percentage decrease for the Baltimore company since July 20, 2001, when shares fell 21 percent after Constellation lowered its earnings forecast for that year.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | August 14, 2008
A major Wall Street firm cut Constellation Energy Group's credit rating yesterday after the Baltimore-based company recently revised its estimate of how much collateral it would need to address such a downgrade. Corporate credit rating agency Standard & Poor's cut Constellation's rating from BBB+ to BBB and gave it a "stable" outlook for maintaining the rating. It previously had a negative outlook for the higher rating. The rating downgrade triggers about $106 million in collateral requirements from certain company contracts.
NEWS
By Roger Twigg and Roger Twigg,Staff Writer | May 21, 1992
City police are investigating a Southwest Baltimore auto dealer who allegedly operated a pawnbroker business that accepted cars as collateral for cash loans.An undercover police lieutenant from the Criminal Investigation Division yesterday went to Variety Auto Brokers Inc. in the 1800 block of S. Caton Ave. and seized records after agreeing to pawn his 1988 Mustang convertible for $3,000.Under the terms of the loan, the detective would have until the end of the month to pay a total of $3,600 -- a figure that includes $600 in interest -- or risk having the car sold to satisfy the loan.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 6, 2004
Collateral sells its audience a bill of goods. It may be handsome as can be, it may be well-acted and energetically presented, but it's still a bill of goods, and one's willingness to accept what it's selling will prove key. There's certainly nothing wrong with the movie's pedigree. Director Michael Mann, who's been putting a high gloss on action dramas since his Miami Vice days, is in the finest of fettle here, while Tom Cruise, playing against type, makes a compelling villain, and co-star Jamie Foxx continues his rise as a Hollywood star.
NEWS
September 25, 1992
A review in Wednesday's Today section of the BAUhouse exhibit "Collateral Damage: The Unseen Cost of Gun Violence" incorrectly attributed the quote, "All guns and armies must be dismantled." The quote should have been attributed to the work of Diego Marcial Rios.The Sun regrets the errors.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2011
The founder of the Baltimore Grand Prix asked a judge Wednesday to prevent organizers of the race from using ticket sales as collateral on future loans because, he alleges, they have failed to make tens of thousands of dollars of payments to him. In separate lawsuits filed in Baltimore City Circuit Court, race founder Steven Wehner and early investor Sean Conley allege that current race organizers have defaulted on payments to them. Wehner and Conley write that the amount that race organizers have borrowed indicates "the real possibility that little, if any, unencumbered monies would be available to satisfy [their]
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,robert.little@baltsun.com | May 6, 2009
Constellation Energy reported a $123.5 million loss for the first three months of 2009 Tuesday, as it continued to pay the costs of last year's brush with bankruptcy and the near-collapse of its commodities trading business. Excluding those one-time costs, Constellation's operations were profitable, and company officials said they were optimistic their recovery is on track. "We're pleased with our company's earnings for 2009 thus far," said Chief Executive Officer Mayo A. Shattuck III, in a conference call for analysts and investors Tuesday morning.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,hanah.cho@baltsun.com | February 4, 2009
Constellation Energy Group announced late yesterday that it sold a big piece of its commodities trading operations, once the biggest source of its growth but more recently the source of financial troubles that forced it to find a merger partner. Macquarie Group of Australia agreed yesterday to buy Constellation's natural gas unit, based in Houston, for an undisclosed price, and supply gas to Constellation NewEnergy Gas, the company's retail division. Yesterday's transaction is the Baltimore company's latest move to reduce risk and the large collateral requirements needed to run trading operations.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | January 28, 2009
Not wanting to see the Senator Theatre closed on their watch, city officials are offering $320,000 to keep it open - provided the 70-year-old movie house is turned into a nonprofit business. "The Senator Theatre is a Baltimore icon," Deputy Baltimore Mayor Andrew Frank said yesterday. "It's ingrained in the psychology of Baltimore. ... Its closing would be felt in ways that would be manifest throughout the community." Frank outlined the plan Monday in a letter to Senator owner Tom Kiefaber, who has warned in recent weeks that the landmark theater, deeply in debt, could close without financial help.
NEWS
January 10, 2009
The United Nations Children's Fund estimates that 2 million children have died in wars in the past decade: Somalia, Afghanistan, Darfur, Colombia, Iraq, Congo. And today Israel and Hamas militants are battling. In southern Israel, scores of children have been terrorized by a barrage of Hamas rockets. In the Gaza Strip, children are dying. Of the nearly 700 killed there, more than 100 are children, according to published reports. Countless others have been injured. Thousands of children who have escaped injury are suffering from a lack of food, safe housing, clean water and medical care.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | September 26, 2008
The notion that Americans should measure the success of military strikes by the size of their collateral damage triggers the plot of Eagle Eye, a suspense film whose action ranges from the Middle East to Andrews Air Force Base and Aberdeen. No argument here, but if studios measured the success of potential blockbusters like Eagle Eye that way, few of them would ever reach the theaters. Eagle Eye has half an idea in its head, but over two hours there's no time to complete or explore it, since the movie isn't just a chase but a combination steeplechase and destruction derby.
NEWS
October 30, 1995
O. D. McKee, 90, founder of the bakery that produces the famous "Little Debbie" snacks, died Friday in Chattanooga, Tenn. He used his car as collateral to buy a bakery there in 1935. He sold it in 1951, but later decided to market snack cakes in a family pack.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | March 11, 2008
LONDON -- The Carlyle Group's troubled mortgage-debt investment fund, Carlyle Capital, said yesterday that it had asked lenders to halt further liquidation of collateral worth as much as $16 billion while the two sides discuss ways to repay the debt. The fund, which invests mainly in triple-A rated mortgage securities issued by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, has received $400 million in margin calls, and some lenders started to liquidate collateral for $5 billion in debt. Banks are asking for their money back amid concerns the economic climate may deteriorate further.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,robert.little@baltsun.com | September 19, 2008
Every one of Constellation Energy Group's 1.1 million electric utility customers can relate to the crisis that forced the company into a shotgun takeover yesterday. Essentially, Wall Street threatened to shut off the power. More precisely, the national rating agencies threatened to cut off the company's credit. And without credit, Constellation was on the brink of losing what it needs to keep nearly all of its multibillion-dollar operation turned on and energized. It was a dilemma common to Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc., AIG Inc. and other financial implosions of recent days.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | August 15, 2008
A few sentences on page 46 of a financial disclosure that did not change reported profits, sales or net worth caused Constellation Energy Group's prospects to go into brownout this week. Its shares dropped 16 percent Tuesday. Analysts rushed to downgrade the stock, although one contrarian changed his recommendation from "underperform" to "hold" because the shares had fallen so far. Standard & Poor's downgraded Constellation bonds to two steps above "junk" status. A little jumpy, aren't we?
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