Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCollard Greens
IN THE NEWS

Collard Greens

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan and By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | January 12, 2003
I would like a recipe for collard greens, the authentic way Southern ladies would prepare it. Y'all should know that a true Southern lady would only prepare herself for dinner, then go out to eat. But true Southerners swear there is nothing better than a pot of black-eyed peas and a steamin' bowl of collard greens. Both are flavored with ham hocks or another piece of pork, and if you serve them with warm corn bread, you've got a little bit of heaven on your table. Believe it or not, this is the second request for a collard greens recipe that I've received this week.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
Mount Vernon's Tabor Ethiopian Restaurant, with its cheery staff and great food, would be a fun place to be a regular. Judging by our recent experience, a lot of people have already adopted Tabor as their dining home away from home. However, walking into a restaurant full of regulars is sometimes intimidating. During our dinner at Tabor, we occasionally felt like rookies in a room of experts, unsure of what to ask or order. Despite some moments feeling off-kilter, the staff was friendly and the food was good.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Charlotte Balcomb Lane and Charlotte Balcomb Lane,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | February 28, 1996
For one of the most nutritious dining choices of the year, try the vegetables of winter.Dark green, leafy vegetables, such as collard greens and kale, are abundant and inexpensive and they're an excellent source of beta-carotene.This meatless recipe takes advantage of the nourishing benefits of collards and kale, which are both members of the cabbage family. Collards have a slightly bitter flavor; kale is sweeter. When cooked together, their flavors enhance each other.Both vegetables have been prized for centuries in the cooking of Africa, Northern Europe and the American South because they are filling, delicious and low in fat. They are also loaded with vitamins A and C, folic acid, calcium, iron and dietary fiber.
HEALTH
By Shanti Lewis, For The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2014
Nutritionists from the University of Maryland Medical System regularly contribute a guest post. The latest post, reprinted here, is from Shanti Lewis. "What diet should I follow?" is the most common question dietitians face. Dietitians seek foods that are nutrient-dense, budget-friendly and versatile. After surveying the group of dietitians at the University of Maryland Medical Center, it appears that there are five common foods that all of us keep on hand that meet that criteria: old-fashioned oats, nonfat plain Greek yogurt, fresh or frozen leafy vegetables, canned or dried beans/lentils, and unsalted nuts/seeds/natural nut butters.
FEATURES
By Jana Sanchez-Klein and Jana Sanchez-Klein,Contributing Writer | December 21, 1994
The model for the Kwanzaa Karamu is taken from the image of an African village after a bountiful harvest when all members of the community bring their produce together and create a feast. One person brings yams, another black-eyed peas or chicken and yet another peanuts. Feasting on foods contributed by each member of the community or family recognizes unity, cooperative economics, collective work and responsibility within2 The next recipe is from Heart & Soul magazine.Collard Greens with OkraServes 62 pounds fresh collard greens or 20 ounces frozen collards2 teaspoons corn oil2 teaspoons chopped fresh sage or rosemary or 1 teaspoon dried1/2 cup chopped scallions1/4 teaspoon salt1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper (or to taste)
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | June 3, 2007
As a cuisine connoisseur -- with a specialty in soul food -- one of the most exciting things about moving to a new city is all of the restaurants to be discovered. A few years ago, I moved from New Orleans to Baltimore with high expectations. With a similar African-American population, surely Charm City would offer a bevy of eateries with foods founded by its largest ethnic group -- perfectly seasoned fried chicken, oh-so-tender collard greens, or sugary-sweet honey butter cornbread. While Baltimore does not have the equivalent of a marquee soul food restaurant like Washington's B. Smith's, New York's Sylvia's or New Orleans' Dooky Chase, it does have several offerings near the downtown area that satisfy the craving.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Rottenberg and Laura Rottenberg,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 1, 1997
Barbecue is an intensely personal thing. I came of age while unreservedly preoccupied by the barbecued chicken and ribs of the black community in Oakland, Calif.Trailing a 3,000-mile wake of bleach-white rib bones to the East Coast, my enthusiasm continues unabated. Thank goodness for Yellow Bowl. Ribs (always the backbone, so to speak, of "soul food" cooking) are good, and all the rest of the fixings are even better.Thirty years old this year, Yellow Bowl claims to be the oldest continuously operated black-owned restaurant in Baltimore.
NEWS
March 15, 2003
Lula M. Woodland, 75, cleaning-service worker Lula M. Woodland, a retired cleaning service worker who enjoyed cooking for family gatherings, died of cancer Tuesday at her Northwest Baltimore home. She was 75. She was born Lula Watson in Newport News, Va., where she graduated from high school. A resident of Baltimore since the 1940s, she was married in 1951 to John R. Woodland, a warehouseman, who died in 1972. Mrs. Woodland worked for 20 years as a clothes presser at Ingleside Dry Cleaners in Catonsville before retiring in 1975.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | April 22, 1994
What am I doing here at a converted Sizzler at 4 o'clock on a Monday afternoon about to eat an enormous Southern dinner?Do I really want to be standing in line with a thousand other people at a place called Carolina Cookin' on Route 40 West? So I can eat fried chicken and greens with fatback?Don't the owners of Carolina Cookin' know this is a bad time to open a new restaurant, that people aren't eating out as much anymore, that at plenty of places I review we're almost the only customers?
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 18, 2002
STUDENTS IN Yvonne Lund's food and nutrition classes at Wilde Lake High School have been creating a little holiday spirit by constructing a village out of graham crackers and candy, and preparing a feast for their classmates. The confectionery town, called "Sugar Shacks," is on display in the school's guidance office. "These houses are just fabulous," Lund said. "We have everything from small castles to villages. People are coming from all over to see them." The town includes an ice cream shop, whose path is paved with peppermints, a ski shop, a farm complete with animals, and the Ho Ho Ho Night Club.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Catherine Mallette, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2013
The next time I have a recipe that calls for cooking greens until they are wilted, I'm going to use twice as much as i think I need - and even mix up the greens. I used all the kale from my CSA pick-up this week to make this recipe for Sausages with Kale and White Beans, and I could have used twice as much. I should have thrown in the half bag of remaining spinach, too.  Kale, which is some sort of cousin to collard greens, I believe, is a popular CSA veggie, and yet, I can't remember ever actually choosing to cook with it before.
HEALTH
By Debra Schulze, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2012
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a guest post. This week, Debra Schulze, RD, LDN, weighs in on vegetables. Did you know there are more than 200 varieties of fruits and vegetables? While praised as a "good for you food," vegetables can be enjoyed in new and fun ways if you use a little imagination. Vegetable nutrition has drawn attention for the many proven health benefits. Most are low in fat and calories while dense in vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals like flavonoids, carotenoids, and polyphenols.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | May 3, 2011
Elizabeth Scott, an art-quilt maker whose work was acclaimed by critics as "filled with hope and sadness and love," died of heart failure April 25 at her home in the Penn North section of West Baltimore. She was 95. Born Elizabeth Caldwell near Chester, S.C., she was a middle child of 14. Her family sharecropped vegetables and cotton on the plantation where her grandparents had been slaves. Her grandfather was a basket weaver, potter and blacksmith. Her father, a railroad worker, made quilts.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2010
With Thanksgiving looming, Kim Thomas and her sister Zina went shopping Sunday for feast fixings where they always go this time of year — under the Jones Falls Expressway. Expecting upward of 20 family members to visit their East Baltimore home on Thursday, the pair made their annual pre-holiday run to the Baltimore Farmers' Market and Bazaar under the JFX, and, by late morning, had bought so many goodies they couldn't hold them all. Zina Thomas, 45, clutched a bag of onions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and Richard Gorelick,Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2009
Do people up here in pit-beef country fight over what makes good barbecue? I know many people have strong opinions about barbecue, but often as not, they turn out to be from one of the barbecuing pilgrimage sites like Memphis or the Carolinas, where people will go on about it. I kind of like that we're more relaxed about it here. It leaves the door open for more upstart businesses and more variations on the theme. Which brings us to Harbor Que (rhymes with "barbecue"), which opened around Memorial Day in a free-standing porch-front place on Lawrence Street where Alladin's Cafe used to be. It's just off Fort Avenue, along the eastern boundary of the Riverside neighborhood.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and Richard Gorelick,Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2009
Elfegne Ethiopian Cafe is a peach. Owned and operated, pretty much single-handedly, by former mortgage broker Emu Kidanewolde, this small and tidy 20-seat storefront cafe is more than just a great place to feast on inexpensive home-cooked Ethiopian food. Elfegne also acts as a de facto community center for the residents of Washington Village (aka Pigtown). It opens at 7 in the morning for breakfast (Kidanewolde will have been there for hours already, making homemade injera, the fermented Ethiopian bread staple)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 26, 1998
Micah's is a soul-food restaurant with a split personality -- part cafeteria, part banquet hall. If you don't mind carrying your own food on a plastic tray to the dining room, Micah's is a good choice for a hearty, comforting meal of lake trout, ribs or smothered pork chops.We entered the bright cafeteria on a recent weekday night, and got on line to survey the evening's choices. Most people were having their dinners boxed up for carryout, but a few, like us, were planning to eat in the dining room.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | March 24, 1992
FROM time to time, Glimpses has described the city's old Chinese restaurants, its Italian restaurants and many of the Jewish delicatessens that used to dot the East Baltimore landscape.Black restaurants are a different category because until the late 1950s and early 1960s, the city's blacks had no choice but to patronize their own eateries if they wanted to eat out. Jim Crow kept them out of white establishments.That, of course, has changed, but it didn't change so long ago that even middle-aged Baltimoreans have forgotten . . .Sess's, at 1639 Division St., between Druid Hill and Pennsylvania avenues, was the most popular black eatery for many years.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | June 3, 2007
As a cuisine connoisseur -- with a specialty in soul food -- one of the most exciting things about moving to a new city is all of the restaurants to be discovered. A few years ago, I moved from New Orleans to Baltimore with high expectations. With a similar African-American population, surely Charm City would offer a bevy of eateries with foods founded by its largest ethnic group -- perfectly seasoned fried chicken, oh-so-tender collard greens, or sugary-sweet honey butter cornbread. While Baltimore does not have the equivalent of a marquee soul food restaurant like Washington's B. Smith's, New York's Sylvia's or New Orleans' Dooky Chase, it does have several offerings near the downtown area that satisfy the craving.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.