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July 5, 2006
Francesca Danieli, an artist who won praise for her photo collages and politically themed video works, died of breast cancer June 27 at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Brooklandville resident was 52. Born Francesca Costagliola in Bethesda, she earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond and a master's degree in business administration from Columbia University. At age 25, she legally changed her name to Danieli. In 1986 she married Gary Gensler, a former partner at Goldman Sachs who became an assistant secretary of the treasury in the Clinton administration.
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NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | June 28, 2009
If there is a common theme linking the finalists for the Janet & Walker Sondheim Prize, it may be that the methods of creating art can be as important as the art itself. "This year is a very process-oriented, installation-based type of show," says Gary Kachadourian, visual arts coordinator with the Baltimore Office for Promotion in the Arts, which created the prize to celebrate the 25th anniversary of Artscape in 2006. "It is a good mix of people, representing a good mix of ideas." Those ideas include finding the artistic potential in dirt, photocopied books, recycled materials, barren parking lots, a polar bear's heart rate and even vintage cartoon character Mr. Magoo.
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FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | February 21, 1995
Robert Courtwright's best collages, at Grimaldis, have nuanced surfaces with subtle modulations of a single color that evoke a sense of serenity. They can also be "read" for meaning in a couple of ways. But at times there's not a lot of staying power to them; some grow in the mind, others just stop.Courtwright cuts rectangular pieces of paper from other sources -- magazines, journals -- and paints them. He arranges them in rectangular grids on a backing -- say, six across and five down.Because these pieces had been printed with words and images, which the paint has not completely covered, one can see things bleeding through the red or the blue of the surface paint.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,ed.gunts@baltsun.com | June 21, 2009
Baltimore's Station North arts and entertainment district has new theaters, restaurants, bars and galleries. Now it's about to get new housing, too - designed for the artists and performers who work in the area. City Arts is the name of a $15 million apartment and townhouse development that is expected to rise starting later this year on a city-owned parcel at 440 E. Oliver St., at Greenmount Avenue. Consisting of 69 apartments for rent and eight townhouses for sale, City Arts will be the first all-new housing project in the 100-acre arts and entertainment district since Mayor Sheila Dixon unveiled a $1 billion vision plan for the area last fall.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | January 29, 1996
Duane Thigpen, local artist, teacher and curator, has organized two shows of African-American artists that've opened the last three months.In October, Maryland Art Place was the site of "Original Aspects of Humanity," featuring 10 artists. Now he has brought us "Free to Be: African-American Artists in a Post Modern Era," an exhibit of seven artists being shown in three Howard County locations.Granted, you can show more works in three locations than in one. But given that it's not likely many people will make the effort to get to all three (and it is an effort; they are several miles apart)
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | February 20, 1996
"Piece by Piece" at Goucher brings together two artists who have much in common but are quite distinct. Both Mary Swann, who lives on a farm near York, and Maria Barbosa, who lives in Frederick but comes from Brazil, work in what can loosely be called collage -- making pictures with bits and pieces of things gathered from various sources. And both fashion works of art that tell stories reflecting their own lives.But Swann's narrative quilts are much the less autobiographical of the two artists' works.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | July 15, 2004
Artist George J. E. Sakkal breaks down existing pictures to build new ones. His collage style moves away from what he calls a traditional approach of building on a photograph's image. He focuses instead on cutting a photograph into slices of paper that can be organized by their color, texture and structure. By doing that, Sakkal said, he has a palette to work with just like oil or watercolor paints. "It allows me to paint with paper," the Ellicott City artist said. Sakkal's collages, which incorporate thousands of meticulously placed paper shards into largely abstract works, are on display at the Howard Community College art gallery in Columbia through July 29. The show is a 25-year retrospective of work by Sakkal, who has taught at Columbia Art Center and will start teaching paper collage at the college in the fall.
FEATURES
December 13, 1998
Sometimes all that's required to enjoy a good book is a little imagination! After reading "Going Home," invite your child to retell the events of the story in order in her own way. She may choose to act it out, write a poem, make a collage of magazine cutouts or draw a series of pictures. Help out if your child gets confused about the characters or the sequence of the events. If your child makes a collage or drawings, ask her to tell you about the story. Help your child learn to use terms such as "What happened first?"
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | October 5, 1995
Catherine Jones' landscapes, such as "After the Rain IV" shown here, have an emotional, expressive impact that provides a good deal of their strength. She is one of three artists exhibiting in "Tiers," a show that opens today at Resurgam. The other artists are Suzanne Hecker, whose works combine printmaking and sculpture and are autobiographical; and Tiffany Holmes, whose multi-media paintings with collage feature distorted figures in surreal environments.Resurgam Gallery, 910 South Charles St., noon to 6 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays and 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Sundays, through Oct. 29. For information call (410)
NEWS
January 27, 2006
In a three-week program, Maria Anasazi, artist-in-residence at Thunder Hill Elementary School in Columbia, is teaching fifth-graders how to make "visual-sculptural" books. The pupils are using mixed-media techniques - including paper, fabric, paint, stamping and collage - to create their individual projects. A grant from the Maryland State Arts Council contributed $1,650 toward the program, and the Thunder Hill PTA matched that amount. A small group of pupils is also working to create six sculptural books, one representing each grade at Thunder Hill, to be on display permanently at the school.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2008
Making art is often a solitary pursuit. But George J.E. Sakkal of Ellicott City said he was particularly alone five years ago when he started using his collages to explore what he saw as a war based on "lies and deceit" in Iraq. At that time, he was told that he was unpatriotic. "It's very difficult to be by yourself ... when you know so strongly that you are right," he said. Today it is a relief and a source of pride that his exhibit of complex, symbolic collages - titled The Art of War: Decisions from the First Year - has found acceptance from audiences and been reinforced by other critics of U.S. policy in Iraq, Sakkal said.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | September 19, 2007
The exhibition of African-American paintings and works on paper at the Zenith Gallery in Washington is one of those rarest of art-world events, a gallery show where most of the artworks on display are not for sale. The Freedom Place Collection includes works by Romare Bearden, Benny Andrews, Alma Thomas, Robert Freeman and Richard Yarde. It belongs to a local couple, Washington attorney Stuart Bloch and his wife, Julia Chang Bloch, who began collecting in the late 1970s, when the value of artworks by African-Americans was not widely appreciated.
NEWS
July 17, 2007
INSIDE TODAY WHAT THEY'RE SAYING TODAY'S SUN COLUMNISTS Imaging Dixon Jean Marbella: Is Sheila Dixon's ranking at the top of The Sun's poll about her image as mayor or as mom? Maryland baltimoresun.com/marbella Ready for some football? With the opening of Ravens training camp rapidly approaching, at least the Orioles are providing some diversion. But that doesn't mean it's too early to start thinking football as well. Sports baltimoresun.com/sports OTHER VOICES Dan Thanh Dang on simple solutions -- Business Tim Smith on summer Tosca -- Today 5 THINGS TO DO TODAY Collage works -- Dave Plunkert's newest collage of paintings is on view at the University of Baltimore Student Center, 21 W. Mount Royal Ave. 8 a.m.-11 p.m. Free.
NEWS
By Madison Park and Madison Park,Sun Reporter | May 28, 2007
The heavy aroma of incense, funnel cake and fresh paint permeated the streets of Southwest Baltimore yesterday for the 22nd annual Sowebohemian Arts and Music Festival. But it was mostly art that was the order of the day with an eclectic array of creators - such as a whimsical Baltimore hon with a beehive hairdo who was selling painted light switch plates. A local artist showed a collage made of old tennis shoes, and jewelers who twisted wires displayed their latest designs on the pavement.
NEWS
July 5, 2006
Francesca Danieli, an artist who won praise for her photo collages and politically themed video works, died of breast cancer June 27 at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Brooklandville resident was 52. Born Francesca Costagliola in Bethesda, she earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond and a master's degree in business administration from Columbia University. At age 25, she legally changed her name to Danieli. In 1986 she married Gary Gensler, a former partner at Goldman Sachs who became an assistant secretary of the treasury in the Clinton administration.
NEWS
January 27, 2006
In a three-week program, Maria Anasazi, artist-in-residence at Thunder Hill Elementary School in Columbia, is teaching fifth-graders how to make "visual-sculptural" books. The pupils are using mixed-media techniques - including paper, fabric, paint, stamping and collage - to create their individual projects. A grant from the Maryland State Arts Council contributed $1,650 toward the program, and the Thunder Hill PTA matched that amount. A small group of pupils is also working to create six sculptural books, one representing each grade at Thunder Hill, to be on display permanently at the school.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | June 3, 1994
A hand-painted collage withstood competition from several computer-generated designs and took the $1,000 first prize in the 1994 Maryland Wine Festival Poster Contest.Amid many interruptions from two young children, a husband and her free-lance writing, Patricia S. "Pat" Brodowski put together an 18-by-24-inch collage from paper she hand-painted.Ms. Brodowski, 40, made the entire image from the paper, which she cut and applied to her design. She said she often carried the colored pieces along on family outings and "snipped" pictures in her spare moments.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | January 24, 1996
The fine arts gallery at UMBC has a distinguished record of presenting shows of regional and national interest. For the current show, it has now gone international with "Layers: Contemporary Collage from St. Petersburg, Russia."It's a tantalizing show built on an interesting premise, but it must be judged a failure for one overriding reason: The work is difficult to understand, and there's no attempt to explain it with clarity.The show is based on the premise (I think) that the version of history so carefully constructed during the Soviet years has been shattered in post-Soviet Russia, and history is constantly being revised.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | June 7, 2005
Since the 1970s, critics have had to make a distinction between "photographers who are artists" and "artists who use photography." The difference has to do with the way artists who work with camera images regard the history and conventions of art photography. I think of "photographers who are artists" as people skilled in the traditional techniques and methods of the medium. A list of their names would include the usual suspects in any discussion of "great photographers" - Eugene Atget and Andre Kertesz, Walker Evans and Dorothea Lange, Henri Cartier-Bresson and Richard Avedon, to name just a few. In the other category are people who think of themselves as artists in terms of the traditional fine arts media such as painting and sculpture, yet also incorporate camera imagery into their work.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | July 15, 2004
Artist George J. E. Sakkal breaks down existing pictures to build new ones. His collage style moves away from what he calls a traditional approach of building on a photograph's image. He focuses instead on cutting a photograph into slices of paper that can be organized by their color, texture and structure. By doing that, Sakkal said, he has a palette to work with just like oil or watercolor paints. "It allows me to paint with paper," the Ellicott City artist said. Sakkal's collages, which incorporate thousands of meticulously placed paper shards into largely abstract works, are on display at the Howard Community College art gallery in Columbia through July 29. The show is a 25-year retrospective of work by Sakkal, who has taught at Columbia Art Center and will start teaching paper collage at the college in the fall.
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