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Collaboration

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NEWS
April 15, 2013
The proposed partnership announced earlier this month between the University of Maryland College Park and the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington is one of the more unusual ideas floated in recent years, not least because it would involve Maryland's flagship university investing in a privately owned institution located outside the state. Yet from what is known of the plan so far the potential benefits for both UM and the Corcoran could far outweigh the risks involved in such an arrangement, and for that reason it's worth exploring further.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
Last year, Baltimore beer drinkers were introduced to Full Tilt Brewing's Berger Cookie Chocolate Stout. Less than 11 months later, Frederick's Flying Dog Brewery has announced its own collaboration with another Baltimore cookie institution, Otterbein's Bakery. Four types of beer resulted from the partnership: Imperial Hefeweizen (inspired by Otterbein's sugar cookies), Oatmeal Raisin Stout (inspired by Otterbein's oatmeal raisin cookies), Oak-Aged Hazelnut Scotch Ale (inspired by Otterbein's ginger cookies)
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BUSINESS
April 18, 1996
MedImmune Inc., a Gaithersburg-based biotechnology company, said yesterday that it has agreed to collaborate with Rockefeller University to develop a vaccine to prevent or treat illnesses caused by a virulent bacteria, Streptococcus pneumoniae.MedImmune also struck a licensing deal with the New York school for the rights to commercialize any vaccines developed from the collaboration. The two did not disclose financial details of the agreement.The bacteria MedImmune and Rockefeller have targeted is the leading cause of blood stream infections, pneumonia and ear infections in children, and the third leading cause of meningitis.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
The NFL announced Thursday that former United States District Judge Barbara S. Jones has been appointed by the league to hear and decide the suspension appeal filed by the NFL Players Association on behalf of Ray Rice. “We are grateful to Judge Jones for taking on this role,” said league commissioner Roger Goodell, who suspended the former Ravens running back indefinitely after video came out Sept. 8 of Rice assaulting his then-fiancee. “She will have our full cooperation as she hears and decides this appeal.” Goodell was asked by the players' union to recuse himself from the hearing because he'll likely be a witness in the case.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | August 8, 1994
Last year I reviewed a publication from the Amherst H. Wilder Foundation that dealt with what I believe will be a critical issue for nonprofits in the next decade -- collaboration. If nonprofits are to flourish, they will need to find innovative, creative solutions to intractable problems. That calls for strategic partnerships, in which each player adds targeted strengths to the equation.The Wilder Foundation's booklet was both thoughtful and comprehensive and reflected a commitment to high quality.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | May 14, 1997
Human Genome Sciences Inc., the Rockville biotechnology company mapping genetic codes, yesterday reported a net loss of $12 million, or 62 cents per share, for the first quarter of 1997.By comparison, the company posted a profit of $4.28 million, or 22 cents per share, for the same period last year.Company executives attributed the difference to a sharp variance in the company's receipt of payments from research and development partners.During the first quarter ending March 31, Human Genome said it received $1.3 million in collaboration revenue.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | June 28, 1993
A buzzword among nonprofit organizations lately seems to be "collaboration."Funding sources, eager to see their charitable dollars stretch further in today's very tight economy, are encouraging -- even forcing -- nonprofits to work closely together to meet some social service needs in their communities. The question is whether these efforts are truly collaborative.In increasing numbers, nonprofits are certainly cooperating in attacking deep-seated social problems. In other cases, they may go further and coordinate their efforts.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | July 5, 1993
(Second of 2 parts)Collaboration as a concept may be in, but in practice too many nonprofits stop short of true collaboration. Instead, they may cooperate or coordinate -- but that's far less of a commitment than collaborative ventures.A recent report on collaboration in the nonprofit sector, published by the Amherst H. Wilder Foundation of St. Paul, Minn., provides readers with a wealth of information. The report is a prelude to a forthcoming workbook on the same topic.The authors begin this concise report by first providing the reader with working definitions of cooperation, coordination and collaboration.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2001
Leading lawmakers served notice to University System of Maryland officials yesterday that they expect it to form a top-level biosciences council to increase research collaboration among its member institutions. Del. Nancy K. Kopp and Sen. Robert R. Neall told Chancellor Donald N. Langenberg and the presidents of four of the institutions that they want the system to develop a comprehensive plan to make the best use of the state's biotechnology research. For the second straight week, the educators came to Annapolis to brief House Appropriations and Senate Budget and Taxation subcommittees on their cooperative efforts in biotech, considered a vital element in Maryland's future economic development.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | December 4, 2003
Colorful installations and subdued drawings contrast in Territory/Ambiguity, on display at the Maryland Art Place. Artists Paul Bartow and Richard Metzgar's massive collaboration, a site installation called "Collection Intersection," is bright and busy. Panels of wood, many of which are coated with candy-colored paints, collide with upholstered furniture, industrial building materials and Plexiglas-encased ferric chloride drawings in a large work that fills two of the gallery's three rooms.
NEWS
By Richard S. Madaleno Jr | August 4, 2014
Excessive drinking among college students is a public health problem that is larger than just the colleges and universities. It is a problem for our entire state. The more than 270,000 students attending college in Maryland comprise a large and critical segment of our future workforce. This is why I was proud to work with the leadership and staff of the Maryland Collaborative to Reduce College Drinking and Related Problems this legislative session to ban the sale of extreme-strength "grain" alcohol.
NEWS
By Michelle Minton | July 30, 2014
This month, Maryland banned high-proof liquors like Everclear and other inexpensive tipples . Self-proclaimed public health activists claimed such "high octane" liquors increased the likelihood of binge-drinking and sexual assaults on college campuses. While the merits of the ban are debatable, one aspect of it is not: the use of taxpayer money to support a political agenda.   The "grain alcohol ban" was backed by the Maryland Collaborative to Reduce College Drinking and Related Problems, a coalition of researchers and administrators at 10 Maryland colleges and universities.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
The state's major education players — from school boards to teachers unions and superintendents — signed a pledge Friday to work together to fine-tune a new teacher evaluation system put in place this school year. The action taken at the state school board meeting came moments after a preliminary vote to approve new regulations that would require 20 percent of a teacher's evaluation to be based on annual goals that take test score data into account for the next two years. Teacher evaluations continue to be a delicate issue because some educators have been critical of the use of test scores to evaluate teachers and believe the new system is being pushed through too quickly with a host of other changes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2014
A significant number of Baltimore-area residents are struggling with so many challenges — from a lack of education to the lack of a car — that they're hard-pressed to land a job and even harder-pressed to find one that can lift them out of poverty, according to a regional group of government agencies, nonprofits and other players. "Most of the region's low-skilled job seekers face multiple and complex barriers to employment opportunity that have been getting worse," the Opportunity Collaborative concluded in its report, released Monday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
If you composed a list of local brands that could be considered venerable, Old Bay would probably sit at the top. From popcorn to pizza - and the seasoning's most beloved partner, steamed crabs - Marylanders have found many uses for the McCormick & Co. spices-and-herbs blend over the past 75 years. But now, Old Bay is trying some new moves to bolster its visibility in and beyond Baltimore. This month, Old Bay entered the increasingly popular craft-beer market by collaborating with Frederick's Flying Dog Brewery on a seasonal beer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
The early candidate for rap album of the year begins with a mother warning her son to stop following in the footsteps of his incarcerated father. The colorfully delivered advice was given to Keenon Daequan Ray Jackson, the 24-year-old rapper better known as YG who performs Wednesday at Baltimore Soundstage. Although YG did not adhere to the counsel (he spent six months in jail for residential burglary before he signed to Def Jam in 2009), the Compton, Calif., MC proved he was on his own path with the release of “My Krazy Life,” an acclaimed first album that debuted at No. 2 on the Billboard 200 in March.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2001
Leaders of four Maryland public institutions of higher learning will troop to Annapolis today to tell legislators about how well they're working together to make the state a national leader in biotechnology. Chances are, the lawmakers will not be impressed. In the diplomatic language of supposedly sisterly schools, top educators at the University of Maryland, College Park; University of Maryland, Baltimore County; University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute; and University of Maryland, Baltimore will tacitly admit that they deserve less than top grades for collaboration.
NEWS
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 5, 2006
"I think a big wasted resource in this county is senior citizens," says Bob Spongberg, 79, a retired engineer who lives in Columbia. That is why he has volunteered to work with pupils at Harper's Choice Middle School as part of a new collaboration between the school and the county's Office on Aging. The tutoring sessions pair seniors with pupils for an hour once a week. If the program goes well, other schools might add it. "This particular program is kind of a microcosm of what we envision," said Judi Bard, program specialist for the Howard County Office on Aging.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
Biotechnology company MedImmune said Tuesday it has expanded a bioresearch collaboration it started with the University of System of Maryland. The Gaithersburg company, a development arm of AstraZeneca, started the partnership with the University of Maryland Baltimore in 2013 and will now also work with campuses in College Park and Baltimore County. Research will start on five projects under the expanded agreement. MedImmune will contribute at least $5 million to the partnership over a five-year period, and the University System of Maryland institutions will contribute $800,000.
NEWS
By Sean Welsh, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2014
Complaints about stomach aches in Harford County might turn out to be more than a series of bellyaching. The Harford County Health Department and the Maryland Department of Health & Mental Hygiene are investigating an outbreak of stomach issues, a spokesman said Sunday night. "I can confirm a collaborative investigation between ourselves and the Maryland Department of Health & Mental Hygiene of what we believe at this time to be a restaurant-associated outbreak of gastroenteritis," said Harford County Health Department spokesman William Wiseman.
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