Advertisement
HomeCollectionsColin Firth
IN THE NEWS

Colin Firth

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gene Seymour and Gene Seymour,Newsday | May 8, 2008
Thirteen years have passed since Colin Firth became, as Jane Austen might put it, "universally acknowledged" as the definitive Mr. Darcy in the lionized BBC TV miniseries of Austen's Pride and Prejudice. In the intervening time, the 47-year-old actor has established himself among worldwide audiences as a go-to guy when it comes to British romantic leads not played by Hugh Grant -- who was, you'll recall, Firth's rival in 2001's Bridget Jones's Diary. Firth describes Then She Found Me, which opens tomorrow, as straddling the edge of both his "serious" and "comedic" projects.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | February 13, 2009
Isla Fisher plays Rebecca Bloomwood, the title character in Confessions of a Shopaholic, as a woman whose hand-eye coordination works at top speed only when she's grabbing for a sale item. The funny idea behind her performance is that she's so distracted by hot dreams of buying stylish goods for bargain prices that she can't keep brain and body working together. You never believe, even in a fantasy way, that Bloomwood could stumble into a job at a Manhattan-based financial magazine for a Conde Nast-like conglomerate.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | May 9, 2008
What's wrong with Helen Hunt's appearance in Then She Found Me is not that she looks terrible -- pinched emotionally as well as physically -- but that Colin Firth keeps telling her she looks wonderful. And even a Firth who's deliberately sloppy (as he is here) is not the kind of man to lose his head in love that easily. In this New York cheer-and-tearjerker, Firth plays a guy at loose ends raising two kids by writing book-flap copy, and Hunt plays a schoolteacher aching for a baby. At the beginning, Hunt marries a friend and fellow teacher (Matthew Broderick)
FEATURES
By Mark Olsen | August 22, 2008
At some point, Colin Firth took over for Hugh Grant as America's official Englishman. Stiffly charming and awkwardly mannered, Firth conveys everything that Americans love, hate, love to hate and hate to love about the British. He's even become something of a middle-class heartthrob, to boot. It's all on display in When Did You Last See Your Father?, an adaptation of the novel by Blake Morrison, directed by Anand Tucker (Shopgirl). Firth plays an award-winning poet who is forced to confront long-simmering resentments toward his father (Jim Broadbent)
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 27, 2006
The kids are nasty beyond all reason, and Emma Thompson's makeup is about as repulsive as humanly possible, but Nanny McPhee offers simply a great time to be had at the movies. Abandoning any sense of vanity, Thompson sports a bulbous nose, hairy warts and a buck tooth to end all buck teeth as the film's title character, a mysterious, officious nanny who shows up unannounced to care for the seven unruly children of widower Mr. Brown (Colin Firth), a harried mortician just one step away from debtor's prison.
FEATURES
By Mark Olsen | August 22, 2008
At some point, Colin Firth took over for Hugh Grant as America's official Englishman. Stiffly charming and awkwardly mannered, Firth conveys everything that Americans love, hate, love to hate and hate to love about the British. He's even become something of a middle-class heartthrob, to boot. It's all on display in When Did You Last See Your Father?, an adaptation of the novel by Blake Morrison, directed by Anand Tucker (Shopgirl). Firth plays an award-winning poet who is forced to confront long-simmering resentments toward his father (Jim Broadbent)
FEATURES
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2001
Thursday 5 April 7:25 p.m. Ohmigod. Have to attend advance screening of "Bridget Jones's Diary." Refused to read the book when it first came out. Seemed v. v. silly and demeaning, and Bridget sounded like an annoying, desperate nutbag. But Colin Firth (to DIE for) is in it. Was SO swoonworthy in BBC's "Pride and Prejudice" and should make "Bridget" not entirely a waste of time. 9:30 p.m. My life is complete. Film was most excellent - v. v. funny even though Renee Zellweger was v. v. annoying (as expected of nutbag Bridget)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 13, 2001
The film "Bridget Jones's Diary" is Renee Zellweger's triumph. She gives her all to the role of a lovelorn publicist at a London publishing house. Zellweger has a ticklish furriness reminiscent of Jean Arthur in her screwball comic prime. She rejuvenates even the most trifling and formulaic moments. Her acquisition of a British accent and about 20 additional pounds are the least of her accomplishments. Zellweger's Bridget can't be measured in weight gained, drinks imbibed, cigarettes smoked or calories eaten - to name the statistics that start each entry in Helen Fielding's fictional best seller of the same name.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 31, 2002
Any good production of Oscar Wilde's 1895 masterpiece,The Importance of Being Earnest, exemplifies the joys of play-acting. The comedy's hero, Jack, makes up a rapscallion brother called Ernest to escape his country obligations and lark about the city - where, as Ernest, he wins the devotion of fair Gwendolen. In the country, Jack's best friend Algernon poses as Ernest in order to woo Jack's ward, Cecily, who has fallen in love with "Ernest" from afar. When London-based Gwendolen and Lady Bracknell (Algernon's cousin and aunt)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 4, 1997
It might be a little early in 1997 to talk about the miniseries of the year, but "Joseph Conrad's Nostromo," which begins tomorrow night on PBS' "Masterpiece Theatre," is as lavish, large and engaging as anything I've seen since A&E's "Pride and Prejudice" last January.Filmed on location in Cartagena, Colombia, and set in the 1890s, the six-hour epic has: a jungle, harbor, city, silver mine, mountains, two armies, two revolutions, a band of outlaws and a cast talented enough to stock two or three of the kinds of miniseries made on commercial networks these days.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | May 9, 2008
What's wrong with Helen Hunt's appearance in Then She Found Me is not that she looks terrible -- pinched emotionally as well as physically -- but that Colin Firth keeps telling her she looks wonderful. And even a Firth who's deliberately sloppy (as he is here) is not the kind of man to lose his head in love that easily. In this New York cheer-and-tearjerker, Firth plays a guy at loose ends raising two kids by writing book-flap copy, and Hunt plays a schoolteacher aching for a baby. At the beginning, Hunt marries a friend and fellow teacher (Matthew Broderick)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gene Seymour and Gene Seymour,Newsday | May 8, 2008
Thirteen years have passed since Colin Firth became, as Jane Austen might put it, "universally acknowledged" as the definitive Mr. Darcy in the lionized BBC TV miniseries of Austen's Pride and Prejudice. In the intervening time, the 47-year-old actor has established himself among worldwide audiences as a go-to guy when it comes to British romantic leads not played by Hugh Grant -- who was, you'll recall, Firth's rival in 2001's Bridget Jones's Diary. Firth describes Then She Found Me, which opens tomorrow, as straddling the edge of both his "serious" and "comedic" projects.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 27, 2006
The kids are nasty beyond all reason, and Emma Thompson's makeup is about as repulsive as humanly possible, but Nanny McPhee offers simply a great time to be had at the movies. Abandoning any sense of vanity, Thompson sports a bulbous nose, hairy warts and a buck tooth to end all buck teeth as the film's title character, a mysterious, officious nanny who shows up unannounced to care for the seven unruly children of widower Mr. Brown (Colin Firth), a harried mortician just one step away from debtor's prison.
FEATURES
By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 1, 2002
NEW YORK - So you want Reese Witherspoon's perfect little life? The kudos for strong comedic performances in Election and Legally Blonde? The cute-on-cute looks? The storybook marriage to actor Ryan Phillippe? Having it all never seemed so meaningless when Witherspoon was out with her then-infant daughter, Eva, in the park. "I had to put her in the back of the car and change her and a paparazzi got her," Witherspoon recalled in an interview to promote her new movie, The Importance of Being Earnest.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 31, 2002
Any good production of Oscar Wilde's 1895 masterpiece,The Importance of Being Earnest, exemplifies the joys of play-acting. The comedy's hero, Jack, makes up a rapscallion brother called Ernest to escape his country obligations and lark about the city - where, as Ernest, he wins the devotion of fair Gwendolen. In the country, Jack's best friend Algernon poses as Ernest in order to woo Jack's ward, Cecily, who has fallen in love with "Ernest" from afar. When London-based Gwendolen and Lady Bracknell (Algernon's cousin and aunt)
FEATURES
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2001
Thursday 5 April 7:25 p.m. Ohmigod. Have to attend advance screening of "Bridget Jones's Diary." Refused to read the book when it first came out. Seemed v. v. silly and demeaning, and Bridget sounded like an annoying, desperate nutbag. But Colin Firth (to DIE for) is in it. Was SO swoonworthy in BBC's "Pride and Prejudice" and should make "Bridget" not entirely a waste of time. 9:30 p.m. My life is complete. Film was most excellent - v. v. funny even though Renee Zellweger was v. v. annoying (as expected of nutbag Bridget)
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | February 13, 2009
Isla Fisher plays Rebecca Bloomwood, the title character in Confessions of a Shopaholic, as a woman whose hand-eye coordination works at top speed only when she's grabbing for a sale item. The funny idea behind her performance is that she's so distracted by hot dreams of buying stylish goods for bargain prices that she can't keep brain and body working together. You never believe, even in a fantasy way, that Bloomwood could stumble into a job at a Manhattan-based financial magazine for a Conde Nast-like conglomerate.
FEATURES
By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 1, 2002
NEW YORK - So you want Reese Witherspoon's perfect little life? The kudos for strong comedic performances in Election and Legally Blonde? The cute-on-cute looks? The storybook marriage to actor Ryan Phillippe? Having it all never seemed so meaningless when Witherspoon was out with her then-infant daughter, Eva, in the park. "I had to put her in the back of the car and change her and a paparazzi got her," Witherspoon recalled in an interview to promote her new movie, The Importance of Being Earnest.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 13, 2001
The film "Bridget Jones's Diary" is Renee Zellweger's triumph. She gives her all to the role of a lovelorn publicist at a London publishing house. Zellweger has a ticklish furriness reminiscent of Jean Arthur in her screwball comic prime. She rejuvenates even the most trifling and formulaic moments. Her acquisition of a British accent and about 20 additional pounds are the least of her accomplishments. Zellweger's Bridget can't be measured in weight gained, drinks imbibed, cigarettes smoked or calories eaten - to name the statistics that start each entry in Helen Fielding's fictional best seller of the same name.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff | September 9, 1999
Now, it's time for the heavyweights.Oh sure, 1999 already has seen the return of a galaxy far, far away in "The Phantom Menace," Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman naked in "Eyes Wide Shut," some unlucky film students in "The Blair Witch Project" and films starring everyone from Michelle Pfeiffer to Bruce Willis.But now things get serious. Over the next four months, all manner of Hollywood royalty will be featured on screen, including Harrison Ford, Meryl Streep, Denzel Washington, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Tom Hanks, Meg Ryan, Sean Penn and Winona Ryder.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.