Advertisement
HomeCollectionsColeus
IN THE NEWS

Coleus

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
carolepete@verizon.net | May 16, 2013
Gardeners will have a hard time finding impatiens for their flower gardens this year. The dreaded downy mildew fungal disease that began in Florida last year has spread to Maryland and has infected the ever-popular Impatiens walleriana. The downy mildew disease is not harmful to humans. Only the impatiens plant is affected by this disease that is airborne and in the soil of the impatiens. This means the flower most gardeners go to for instant color and continuous blooms all season is in short supply.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
My Crimson King Norway maples are slowly dying, one by one. I see trunk cracks but can't see any disease or insects. How can I save the rest? Norway maples in general are notorious for strangling themselves to death. The roots often encircle and crisscross over the base of the trunk, cutting off nutrients and water from the root system. Death can take decades but often happens just when trees reach a pleasing size and shape. A dead giveaway is when there is no natural flare on a side of the trunk base; instead, the trunk is flat, going into the soil.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | May 20, 2001
In kindergarten, everyone in our class was given a coleus to take home. The leaves were velvety splats of moss green, cream and deep rose that looked like little botanical Rorshak tests. It turned out to be my initiation into gardening. Together, my mother and I planted it in the shade of the lilac where I inspected it every time I spit watermelon seeds over the porch rail. But while I applauded the plant's enthusiastic growth, I didn't like its looks. Moss green and rose weren't my colors.
NEWS
carolepete@verizon.net | May 16, 2013
Gardeners will have a hard time finding impatiens for their flower gardens this year. The dreaded downy mildew fungal disease that began in Florida last year has spread to Maryland and has infected the ever-popular Impatiens walleriana. The downy mildew disease is not harmful to humans. Only the impatiens plant is affected by this disease that is airborne and in the soil of the impatiens. This means the flower most gardeners go to for instant color and continuous blooms all season is in short supply.
NEWS
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
My Crimson King Norway maples are slowly dying, one by one. I see trunk cracks but can't see any disease or insects. How can I save the rest? Norway maples in general are notorious for strangling themselves to death. The roots often encircle and crisscross over the base of the trunk, cutting off nutrients and water from the root system. Death can take decades but often happens just when trees reach a pleasing size and shape. A dead giveaway is when there is no natural flare on a side of the trunk base; instead, the trunk is flat, going into the soil.
NEWS
By Cindy Hoedel and Cindy Hoedel,Knight Ridder / Tribune | November 17, 2002
Forget the grocery store mum bouquets. Fall is prime season for found-object floral displays. Interesting natural materials are just outside your door, waiting to be noticed. They're overhead and underfoot. To find them you have to learn to look with the eyes of a florist -- to see past the pine cones and imagine the possibilities of gnarled honeysuckle and lumpy, bumpy hedge apples. Foraged arrangements have several advantages over store-bought ones: They have a rustic charm. They're unique.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | July 19, 1998
Imagine that you're wandering through a friend's backyard garden and you come upon an old wooden chair. It looks as if it's been there forever. Discarded and forgotten, the chair spills over with a profusion of violets and trailing vines, which grow where the cane seat used to be.This enchanting vignette has, of course, been carefully contrived by a resourceful gardener. It just doesn't look that way. Your friend has removed the chair's caning and replaced it with chicken wire in the shape of a shallow bowl.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | September 3, 2006
These ceramic "Tinkling Toadstools" have mushroom-colored stems that are separate from the glazed ceramic tops, so they sway and tinkle in the slightest puff of wind. They come in three sizes, from 11 to 21 inches, and 15 colors, and they look charming grouped among foliage plants. Freshen your pots with late-season replacements for those tired-looking annuals. Most garden centers are having sales on the last of summer flowers, and some nice-looking plants are still available. Try a colorful collection of coleus for something different to enter the fall.
FEATURES
By Amalie Adler Ascher | July 13, 1991
Polka dot plantBotanical name: Hypoestes phyllostachyaPronunciation: hy-po-ES-tessFamily: Acanthaceae (Ancanthus)Origin: MadagascarClass: Annual/houseplantDisplay period: Year-roundHeight: 10 inchesEnvironment: SunShow me a plant with pink foliage and it's almost a certainty I'l want it for my own. I was so smitten, in fact, with Pink Splash Select -- a superior variety of polka dot plant developed by Pan American Seed -- that I couldn't resist buying a...
NEWS
June 11, 2000
Q. I've been reading a lot about lead poisoning in the newspaper lately. I don't live in the city, but should I have my garden soil tested? Who does that kind of testing? A. Soil lead is not just a city problem. Elevated levels -- from decades of burning leaded gasoline -- may be found in anyone's garden bed. Yes, it is a good idea to have your soil tested. Various testing labs are listed in the phone book. The University of Massachusetts offers a complete soil test for $8 that also includes a lead test.
NEWS
By Cindy Hoedel and Cindy Hoedel,Knight Ridder / Tribune | November 17, 2002
Forget the grocery store mum bouquets. Fall is prime season for found-object floral displays. Interesting natural materials are just outside your door, waiting to be noticed. They're overhead and underfoot. To find them you have to learn to look with the eyes of a florist -- to see past the pine cones and imagine the possibilities of gnarled honeysuckle and lumpy, bumpy hedge apples. Foraged arrangements have several advantages over store-bought ones: They have a rustic charm. They're unique.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | May 20, 2001
In kindergarten, everyone in our class was given a coleus to take home. The leaves were velvety splats of moss green, cream and deep rose that looked like little botanical Rorshak tests. It turned out to be my initiation into gardening. Together, my mother and I planted it in the shade of the lilac where I inspected it every time I spit watermelon seeds over the porch rail. But while I applauded the plant's enthusiastic growth, I didn't like its looks. Moss green and rose weren't my colors.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | July 19, 1998
Imagine that you're wandering through a friend's backyard garden and you come upon an old wooden chair. It looks as if it's been there forever. Discarded and forgotten, the chair spills over with a profusion of violets and trailing vines, which grow where the cane seat used to be.This enchanting vignette has, of course, been carefully contrived by a resourceful gardener. It just doesn't look that way. Your friend has removed the chair's caning and replaced it with chicken wire in the shape of a shallow bowl.
FEATURES
By Nancy Brachey and Nancy Brachey,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | September 14, 1997
Do you know your shade?Some shade is total; its dense canopy creates dim spots hospitable to few plants.Partial shade is less exclusive. It lets sunshine leak through thinner layers of leaves or sneak in around the edges for part of the day. More plants are welcome in this dappled environment.And seasonal shade is the protective kind. In summer, leafy trees keep the hottest of afternoon sun off delicate flowers, and, in winter, evergreen trees protect shrubs from scorching morning sun.Shade, of course, is everywhere.
FEATURES
July 5, 1998
Q. Several of my trees suffered broken branches and split trunks from all the nasty storms we've had. I don't want to cut the trees down. What can I do to repair the damage?A.Remove broken branches where they join a healthy branch. Get help from a pal or hire a tree-care service if the limbs are very large.You should plan to have the trees removed, however, if the trunks are split or most of the large branches have been badly damaged. Such trees could present a hazard to life and property.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.