Advertisement
HomeCollectionsColeman Elementary School
IN THE NEWS

Coleman Elementary School

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Staff Writer Staff writer Gary Gately contributed to this article | December 9, 1993
Baltimore's Board of Estimates approved contracts yesterday with Educational Alternatives Inc. to take over noninstructional services at two city schools, following a lengthy hearing marked by technical and philosophical discussions.The board, which two weeks ago postponed consideration of the contracts, approved them 3-1, with Comptroller Jacqueline F. McLean voting against the proposals and City Council President Mary Pat Clarke abstaining.The agreements, which are worth a total of $10 million, call for Minneapolis-based EAI to take over the financial management, cafeterias, security and maintenance at City College and Robert W. Coleman Elementary School as part of a citywide move to school-based management.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 11, 2000
Roberta Coleman Keets, 83, Social Security administrator Roberta Coleman Keets, a retired Social Security administrator and civic activist, died May 3 of complications of a heart attack at Johns Hopkins Hospital. She was 83 and lived in West Baltimore. She retired in 1979 after 35 years with the Social Security Administration in Washington as an administrative assistant with the international staff. Roberta Coleman was born in Baltimore and was a graduate of Douglass High School and Cortez Peters Business School.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 11, 2000
Roberta Coleman Keets, 83, Social Security administrator Roberta Coleman Keets, a retired Social Security administrator and civic activist, died May 3 of complications of a heart attack at Johns Hopkins Hospital. She was 83 and lived in West Baltimore. She retired in 1979 after 35 years with the Social Security Administration in Washington as an administrative assistant with the international staff. Roberta Coleman was born in Baltimore and was a graduate of Douglass High School and Cortez Peters Business School.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Staff Writer Staff writer Gary Gately contributed to this article | December 9, 1993
Baltimore's Board of Estimates approved contracts yesterday with Educational Alternatives Inc. to take over noninstructional services at two city schools, following a lengthy hearing marked by technical and philosophical discussions.The board, which two weeks ago postponed consideration of the contracts, approved them 3-1, with Comptroller Jacqueline F. McLean voting against the proposals and City Council President Mary Pat Clarke abstaining.The agreements, which are worth a total of $10 million, call for Minneapolis-based EAI to take over the financial management, cafeterias, security and maintenance at City College and Robert W. Coleman Elementary School as part of a citywide move to school-based management.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,Staff Writer | October 27, 1992
The principal of a West Baltimore school has angered parents with the harsh tone of a letter asking them to invest in a fund for their children's college education."
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Staff Writer | February 25, 1992
Baltimore may start a special middle school for disruptive youngsters, after repeated complaints about violence and discipline problems among young teen-age students.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke said today that plans for a privately run school could be sent to the city school board in about a month. The mayor briefed his Cabinet on the issue of crime at a meeting today at Robert W. Coleman Elementary School in West Baltimore.Today's meeting follows yesterday's shooting of a school police officer while he was on duty at Roland Park Elementary/Middle School.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Evening Sun Staff | December 4, 1990
The derelict men hanging out on the stoops of vacant homes in the 1900 block of Pulaski St. seem befuddled by the line of chanting school children.Some of the loiterers scatter. But others begin chanting along with the students, who are from West Baltimore's Robert W. Coleman Elementary School."Extra! Extra! Read all about it! We hate drugs and we're going to shout it!," yell the children, 404 strong, as they march behind the school's blue and gold banner.Addie E. Johnson, principal of Coleman, conceived of the march, held early in the school year, as a way of confronting the drug menace in the neighborhood.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Evening Sun Staff | November 11, 1991
Tiffanie Walker has four children in Baltimore public schools, an unemployed husband and a hard time making ends meet on the odd jobs that come her way.So the news that Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke may shut schools for a week to save money hit her like a body blow."
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 2, 1998
The state Board of Public Works approved $8.9 million in grants yesterday to replace and repair roofs at 25 Maryland schools, including $2 million for five schools in Baltimore and $247,000 for a Baltimore County school.Nine counties received funds to pay for projects.Baltimore County will receive $247,000 to renovate the roof at Pinewood Elementary School in Timonium.Baltimore City will receive money for Patterson High School ($1 million), Forest Park High School ($383,000), Hampden Elementary School ($230,000)
NEWS
January 8, 1992
After nearly 80 years in Ruxton, from which it educated generations of area children, Ruxton Country School has announced plans to relocate and develop a site in Owings Mills, according to David Moore, chairman of the Board of Trustees.The school's new location will be at 11202 Garrison Forest Road in Owings Mills, 12 miles from the lower school's current location at 1402 Berwick Road and less than four miles from the Beltway. The relocation and development schedule calls for the new school to be opened by the fall of this year.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,Staff Writer | October 27, 1992
The principal of a West Baltimore school has angered parents with the harsh tone of a letter asking them to invest in a fund for their children's college education."
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Staff Writer | February 25, 1992
Baltimore may start a special middle school for disruptive youngsters, after repeated complaints about violence and discipline problems among young teen-age students.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke said today that plans for a privately run school could be sent to the city school board in about a month. The mayor briefed his Cabinet on the issue of crime at a meeting today at Robert W. Coleman Elementary School in West Baltimore.Today's meeting follows yesterday's shooting of a school police officer while he was on duty at Roland Park Elementary/Middle School.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Evening Sun Staff | November 11, 1991
Tiffanie Walker has four children in Baltimore public schools, an unemployed husband and a hard time making ends meet on the odd jobs that come her way.So the news that Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke may shut schools for a week to save money hit her like a body blow."
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Evening Sun Staff | December 4, 1990
The derelict men hanging out on the stoops of vacant homes in the 1900 block of Pulaski St. seem befuddled by the line of chanting school children.Some of the loiterers scatter. But others begin chanting along with the students, who are from West Baltimore's Robert W. Coleman Elementary School."Extra! Extra! Read all about it! We hate drugs and we're going to shout it!," yell the children, 404 strong, as they march behind the school's blue and gold banner.Addie E. Johnson, principal of Coleman, conceived of the march, held early in the school year, as a way of confronting the drug menace in the neighborhood.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Staff Writer | September 11, 1992
Controversial rap singer-actor Ice Cube and his manager have donated $21,751 to fund a summer camp for boys at a Baltimore elementary school that has done extensive work with young black males.But the gift, to Robert W. Coleman Elementary School in West Baltimore, drew little notice at last night's school board meeting, where it was one in a string of routine gifts and donations.The 23-year-old Ice Cube, whose real name is O'Shea Jackson, is one of a group of young rap artists who mix music with often-angry politicalcommentary on subjects that include racism, police brutality and black empowerment.
NEWS
By Jean Leslie and Jean Leslie,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 27, 1997
WORTHINGTON Elementary School has created a "Read-to-Feed" program -- a voluntary reading-incentive program that helps feed hungry Marylanders while encouraging students to read.Here's how it works:Students obtain pledges of nonperishable food items for each book they read.At the end of the program, the school collects the donations and presents them to the Maryland Food Bank.This is the program's fifth year.At an assembly on Jan. 3, Daisy the Clown and a spokesman from the Maryland Food Bank explained the system to the children.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.