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By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2013
Baltimore County has repaid more than $13 million it borrowed last year from its employees' pension fund, leading the county police union to drop a lawsuit over the loan. The county recently paid about $13.1 million, plus more than $500,000 in interest, for the loan, which it took out in 2012 to upgrade a transfer station and build a single-stream recycling system in Cockeysville. Union leaders said this week they were pleased the money was paid back and have filed paperwork to drop their lawsuit against the county retirement system's board of trustees.
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2013
Baltimore County has repaid more than $13 million it borrowed last year from its employees' pension fund, leading the county police union to drop a lawsuit over the loan. The county recently paid about $13.1 million, plus more than $500,000 in interest, for the loan, which it took out in 2012 to upgrade a transfer station and build a single-stream recycling system in Cockeysville. Union leaders said this week they were pleased the money was paid back and have filed paperwork to drop their lawsuit against the county retirement system's board of trustees.
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NEWS
By Nancy A. Youssef and Dan Thanh Dang and Nancy A. Youssef and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2000
A regional manhunt continued last night for three men wanted in the fatal shooting of an off-duty Baltimore County police officer during a morning robbery at a Pikesville jewelry store. Sgt. Bruce A. Prothero, 35, who was working as a security guard at the store, was pronounced dead at Sinai Hospital about noon, 45 minutes after the shooting. The decorated 12-year veteran was married with five young children, including triplets. County police say he is the fifth officer to die in the line of duty in the department's 126-year history.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 18, 1997
After robbing a Brinks armored truck outside a Parkville bank yesterday, a gunman ran to a getaway car while exchanging gunfire with a guard, Baltimore County police said.Sgt. Cole Weston said the guard was unloading several bags of money at Provident Bank of Maryland in the 8200 block of Harford Road about 2: 30 p.m. when a gunman accosted him and demanded the money. The guard dropped the bags, and the gunman picked one up and ran to a nearby getaway car, Weston said.The 61-year-old-guard ran after him. During the chase, they shot at each other, Weston said.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2001
The Ruppersberger administration and the union that represents Baltimore County police officers have reached a tentative agreement on a salary and pension package that would give all officers a 10.25 percent raise July 1. Cole Weston, president of Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 4, said union officials will explain the package to officers today. The 1,700 members will vote on the offer tomorrow and Thursday. Weston will recommend that officers ratify the agreement, which includes a deferred retirement option program for department members with at least 27 years of service and an improved death benefit for surviving spouses.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
A court has ordered Baltimore County to reduce the health insurance premiums it charges hundreds of retired police officers. Baltimore County Circuit Judge Michael J. Finifter gave the county 10 days to comply with the order. The ruling is the latest in the legal dispute between the Baltimore County Fraternal Order of Police Lodge No. 4 and the county government over what proportion of the retirees' health insurance premiums the county pays. A county spokeswoman said Thursday the county's attorneys are reviewing the order, but declined to comment further.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2012
Baltimore County must pay more than $500,000 in attorney's fees and court costs for a case involving a longtime police detective who won a lawsuit that claimed the county violated the Americans with Disabilities Act. In an order filed Wednesday, U.S. District Judge Benson Everett Legg directed the county to pay more than $494,000 in attorney fees and nearly $18,000 in court costs. In 2010, the county lost the case to Detective William Blake, who said the county forced him to undergo unnecessary fitness-for-duty and medical exams a decade after he suffered a seizure, even though he had performed his job without incident since the episode.
NEWS
By Nancy A. Youssef and Nancy A. Youssef,SUN STAFF | October 23, 2000
Baltimore County officials are considering a proposal that would allow lower-ranking police officers to take their cruisers home, a policy that some say would increase the department's presence and help recruitment efforts. County Auditor Brian Rowe has been compiling information for the County Council about the cost of such a program. He also is looking at who might be eligible and whether officers who respond to a call in their cruisers while off duty would receive overtime pay. The council will review the report - Rowe said it should be completed within the next month - before voting on the proposal.
NEWS
By Nancy A. Youssef and Nancy A. Youssef,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2000
Hiring more traffic officers, not dispersing the ones on staff among the county's eight police precincts, is the most effective way to bolster traffic enforcement, a Baltimore County councilman has suggested. Councilman T. Bryan McIntire's suggestion came in reaction to a recent proposal by police Chief Terrence B. Sheridan to restructure the department's traffic unit. "I think the Baltimore County Police Department is one of the finest in the country. I also feel that traffic enforcement is the weakest link," said McIntire, a Republican who represents Owings Mills and the north county.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2011
Earlier this year, Baltimore County promised job security through 2014 for members of three public employee unions, but county officials say they can't make the same guarantee for other labor groups. The Kamenetz administration is in talks with the Baltimore County Federation of Public Employees, the police union and the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, whose contracts expire in June. Together, the unions represent about 4,300 employees, more than half the county's workforce.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2001
Baltimore County police have overwhelmingly rejected a proposed change to their pension plan that was designed to keep experienced officers on the job longer. In tabulations completed yesterday, 97 percent of the Baltimore County Fraternal Order of Police Lodge No. 4 members who cast ballots opposed the proposed Deferred Retirement Option Program. The proposal failed on a 1,106-29 vote, after union leaders raised concerns that only a small number of officers would benefit from the enhancement.
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