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Cold Winter

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NEWS
By Paul McCardell, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
The almanacs are out with their winter predictions. The Old Farmer's Almanac published since 1792 and the Hagers-Town Town and Country Almanack (since 1797) and Farmers' Almanac (since 1818) all are predicting a very cold winter with above-average amounts of snow for the Mid-Atlantic. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration will release its outlook for this winter in October. Also, did you know that The Baltimore Sun once produced an almanac from 1876 to 1928?
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NEWS
By Paul McCardell, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
The almanacs are out with their winter predictions. The Old Farmer's Almanac published since 1792 and the Hagers-Town Town and Country Almanack (since 1797) and Farmers' Almanac (since 1818) all are predicting a very cold winter with above-average amounts of snow for the Mid-Atlantic. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration will release its outlook for this winter in October. Also, did you know that The Baltimore Sun once produced an almanac from 1876 to 1928?
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NEWS
By Phyllis Flowers and Phyllis Lucas | January 13, 1992
Are you wondering what to do with yourself during the cold winter nights?How about going back to school? The great thing about education is that you are never too old to learn.The Anne Arundel County Office of Continuing Education is offering adult education classes at North County High School, 414 Andover Road.Are you interested in the creative arts? If so, you might be interested in learning calligraphy, watercolors, stained glass, ballroom dancing, sewing or quilting. If these areas don't interest you, how about personal interest courses such as introduction to piano, woodworking or horse training.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2014
Dina Kuniken lives in a drafty old house in Baltimore that costs a lot to heat in a normal winter — and this past winter was not normal. Her bill doubled. The nursing assistant was out of work at the time and couldn't afford it. Last month, she scraped together $1,650, got help from the city and Catholic Charities to pay the difference, and finally erased the past-due amount that could have left her and her two children without power. "They got my bill down to zero, and I'm very thankful," said Kuniken, 29. Many are still trying to get to that point.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2001
Hoping to keep construction of a high school outside Westminster on track despite long stretches of cold weather, Carroll County school officials are looking for ways to tweak the building schedule to ensure Winters Mill High opens on time in August 2002. The Board of Education had been scheduled to vote yesterday on whether to spend $291,200 to remove frozen soil and replace it with stone to keep construction on schedule. But interim Superintendent Charles I. Ecker, who is out of the office recovering from bypass surgery, asked his staff to suggest less costly methods of maintaining the pace of construction.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | May 22, 1996
Remember, ''How long can this cold winter go on?''?Marchione better give the fired whistle-blower who warned of the Deer Park School peril the job of the administrator who covered it up, or look to his own.The U.N. agreed for humanitarian reasons to allow Iraqi oil on the world market, and if that doesn't lower the price at the Maryland pump, nothing in Bill Clinton's power can.Psst, don't tell Rush, but two-thirds of the Supreme Court majority in Romer...
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | March 4, 2007
Mike Evitts of Baltimore says, "My mom always told me that a good hard stretch during the winter kills insect larvae, resulting in fewer bugs during the summer. Is this true?" Never contradict your mom, Mike. Let University of Maryland entomologist Mike Raupp do it. He says some insects might perish in an unusually long, cold winter, especially "southern" species expanding from warmer climes. But most native species became cold-adapted millions of years ago. They'll do fine. "I always bet on the bugs," he said.
NEWS
January 15, 2006
1852: Susquehanna ice supports trains In the long, cold winter of 1852 - from Jan. 15 to Feb. 29 - trains between Baltimore and Philadelphia were forced to cross the frozen Susquehanna River on tracks laid across the ice. The railroad link from Philadelphia to Baltimore had been finished in 1838, but initially the wide Susquehanna was too expensive to bridge. Until a bridge was built in 1866, trains were ferried across the river. Often in winter, the ferry boats were frozen in the dock and trains were held up. In 1852, however, the exceptionally cold winter froze the Susquehanna to a depth of 2 to 3 feet, preventing all ferry service.
NEWS
January 22, 2001
Baltimore-area residents awoke to 2 to 10 inches of snow yesterday, depending on where they live. Carroll County received the most: 10 inches in Manchester and 8 inches in Westminster. Baltimore County had 6 to 7 inches and Columbia and Bel Air registered 4 inches. Although this has been a cold winter -- December was the seventh coldest on record since 1871 -- the area has had less snowfall than normal, the National Weather Service says. At Baltimore-Washington International Airport, which has typically recorded 10 inches of snow or more by this point, 3.1 inches -- including 1.9 yesterday -- have fallen this winter.
NEWS
By Rebecca McClay and Rebecca McClay,SUN STAFF | March 9, 2003
Across the region yesterday, residents basked in the return - if only temporarily - of warm weather by washing their cars, eating ice cream and visiting the zoo. With his sweat shirt sleeves pushed up to his elbows, Jamie Jenkins squeezed a dripping sponge across one of five sudsy cars on his Sandtown street. Jenkins, owner of J&V Carwash, a curbside business he has operated in front of his house for 12 years, found himself busier than usual because of the higher temperatures. High pressure moving in from the west brought the region a welcome break from an unusually cold winter.
NEWS
January 13, 2014
Harford County Public Library collected handmade hats and scarves during December to donate to local Faith Communities and Civic Agencies United (FCCAU) shelters before the holidays. More than 500 donations poured in from library staff, customers, knitting groups and local crafting groups. Shelter clients received the items wrapped in gift bags during the week of Christmas.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2012
Count one more prognosticator among those calling for a snowy winter in Maryland -- the Farmer's Almanac. The publication's winter outlook calls for cold and moisture across the Northeast and Great Lakes region. That could mean a lot of snow for the northern parts, but some sleet and rain mixed in for the mid-Atlantic and Ohio Valley, according to the forecast. The almanac has pegged  February 12 - 15 and March 20 - 23 for "major coastal storms along the Atlantic seaboard" -- as in, potential repeats of Snowmageddon-like storms.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2011
The weeks of heavy rain that triggered historic flooding in northeast Australia this month have been blamed on what climatologists are now calling one of the strongest La Nina events in the Pacific Ocean since record-keeping began a half-century ago. La Nina's global influence is also being blamed for heavy rains in Indonesia and Brazil. But unusually persistent cold weather this winter in Maryland, and in much of the eastern United States, heavy December rains in Southern California, and snow across the Deep South are the work of separate weather patterns in the Arctic, scientists say. Called the Arctic, or North Atlantic, Oscillation, these air and ocean patterns have been unusually persistent for the second winter in a row, overwhelming weather "signals" from the tropical Pacific.
NEWS
By susan.reimer@baltsun.com and susan.reimer@baltsun.com,susan.reimer@baltsun.com | November 29, 2008
This month's cold snap was a welcome event in my garden. Finally, I thought, we are going to have a nice, harsh winter with temperatures in the teens every day and a crippling snowstorm or two. But the cold did not last, and moderate temperatures returned with a vengeance. My hope that Mother Nature would kill off the bugs and spores that overwinter in my garden appeared dashed. Dashed, and, it turns out, misplaced. We haven't had a really cold winter in Maryland since 2003, when temperatures averaged below freezing at 30.9 degrees.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | March 4, 2007
Mike Evitts of Baltimore says, "My mom always told me that a good hard stretch during the winter kills insect larvae, resulting in fewer bugs during the summer. Is this true?" Never contradict your mom, Mike. Let University of Maryland entomologist Mike Raupp do it. He says some insects might perish in an unusually long, cold winter, especially "southern" species expanding from warmer climes. But most native species became cold-adapted millions of years ago. They'll do fine. "I always bet on the bugs," he said.
NEWS
January 15, 2006
1852: Susquehanna ice supports trains In the long, cold winter of 1852 - from Jan. 15 to Feb. 29 - trains between Baltimore and Philadelphia were forced to cross the frozen Susquehanna River on tracks laid across the ice. The railroad link from Philadelphia to Baltimore had been finished in 1838, but initially the wide Susquehanna was too expensive to bridge. Until a bridge was built in 1866, trains were ferried across the river. Often in winter, the ferry boats were frozen in the dock and trains were held up. In 1852, however, the exceptionally cold winter froze the Susquehanna to a depth of 2 to 3 feet, preventing all ferry service.
NEWS
January 1, 2002
YOU ARE a true Baltimorean if you remember a little box that used to run each New Year's Day on the front page of The Sun. "If not needed this morning, it may be clipped and saved for future contingencies," the box advised, and it went on to list the ingredients that "would sober a patient in 5 to 35 minutes." This is the recipe: Into a highball glass pour the juice of half a lemon or one orange. Add one-eighth of a teaspoon of salt, two teaspoons of brown sugar and enough ice water to make 8 ounces.
NEWS
By susan.reimer@baltsun.com and susan.reimer@baltsun.com,susan.reimer@baltsun.com | November 29, 2008
This month's cold snap was a welcome event in my garden. Finally, I thought, we are going to have a nice, harsh winter with temperatures in the teens every day and a crippling snowstorm or two. But the cold did not last, and moderate temperatures returned with a vengeance. My hope that Mother Nature would kill off the bugs and spores that overwinter in my garden appeared dashed. Dashed, and, it turns out, misplaced. We haven't had a really cold winter in Maryland since 2003, when temperatures averaged below freezing at 30.9 degrees.
BUSINESS
By CINDY STACY and CINDY STACY,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 9, 2005
McHenry Madalyn and Chuck Hoffeditz vividly remember the day they retired to Garrett County's Deep Creek Lake: July 1, 1999. "Chuck retired that day from the National Weather Service, and I also retired the same day from a private Episcopal school," said Madalyn, 61. "We moved up here that afternoon." Like many of the area's growing number of retirees, the Hoffeditzes were already familiar with the state's second-biggest county in size, an area known for its 3,900-acre lake, spectacular changes of season, year-round outdoor activities and small-town ambience.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | January 29, 2005
ON COLD winter weekends like this one, I long to curl up in front of a roaring fire. Theoretically, I would do this to warm up. An open fire, with logs blazing, is after all, a source of considerable heat. The trouble is that much of this heat goes up the chimney. I found this out when I looked into the science behind the romance of the blazing open fire. I wish I hadn't. There are some bedrock beliefs that are best undisturbed. For me, one of them is that burning chunks of wood in an open fire is a good way to heat up the house.
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