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By Peter Mandel | November 4, 2013
Way down deep, we're all motivated by the same urges. Cats have the courage to live by them. - Jim Davis There they crouch. The words "cat" and "courage" lurking quietly in the same sentence. As an American man, I understand how I'm supposed to react. "Cats?" I should object. "They're all about cushions, about couches. Give me a good mud-loving hound, any day. " Despising felines, or pretending to, is a sex-role rule for us males as powerful as pulling on pants. Friends of mine complain on and on about the fact that cats don't "come when called.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Zimmerman | October 6, 2014
For the past 30 years, I've been urging my students to put themselves in the shoes of people who lived in the past. So why do we make fun of Americans who do that as a hobby? I'm talking about military re-enactors like Eric Frein, the 31-year-old man suspected of killing a police officer and wounding another at a state police barracks in northeastern Pennsylvania last month. A few weeks into the manhunt for Mr. Frein, news organizations reported that he played a Serbian soldier - "Istocni Vuk," he called himself - in a unit that re-creates Eastern European armies from the Cold War era. Mr. Frein studied Serbian and Russian languages and even smoked Serbian cigarettes, as investigators discovered when they searched his home.
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By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2013
Tom Clancy didn't realize he was forever changing the spy novel back in 1982, while working in obscurity on his first book, a Cold War thriller centering on the defection of a Soviet naval captain and the technologically advanced submarine he includes in the bargain. But then "The Hunt for Red October" was published, and things would never be the same - not for spy fiction, which was given new life by the detail-obsessed "techno-thriller" genre he invented, and certainly not for Clancy, who seemingly out of nowhere became one of the country's most prominent authors.
NEWS
By Jerome Israel | August 19, 2014
The U.S. needs Russia. This may sound peculiar coming from a person who spent 25 years at the NSA, almost half of those fighting communism. But our approach to Russia since the end of the Cold War has been unimaginative and aggressive. Politicians in Washington put on their Cold-War glasses any time Russia makes noise. It's time to archive those in the Smithsonian. Many notable academics agree that our policies toward Russia are flawed, but my conclusion - that we need Russia - is derived from the kind of work we mastered at NSA: carefully listening to and analyzing communications, in this case what Russians have said openly on social networks and in private conversations with me during a recent trip to Russia.
NEWS
By Haviland Smith | July 1, 2010
The recent arrest of 10 Russian citizens in America on charges of espionage at first blush appears to be a typical Cold War scenario. But it clearly is not. Human intelligence operations are uniquely equipped to ascertain an enemy's intentions. During the Cold War, the Soviet Union ran extensive intelligence operations against the United States. They targeted just about any American they could, many of whom were insignificant employees of the U.S. Government and members of the armed forces.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | May 24, 1995
Dallas -- THERE MAY APPEAR to be no relationship between the end of the Cold War, Oklahoma City, Chechnya and Islamic fundamentalist violence. I can hear the skeptical reader asking: "Have you been smoking something, Ms. Geyer?"Well, before you stop reading and continue to be confused about the horrors of Oklahoma City, let me quote some insightful words from Don Edward Beck and Chris Cowan, two fine young analysts of the social psychology of groups and nations of our times:"This is an extremely dangerous time.
NEWS
October 5, 1990
Soviet capacity to launch a quick, massive attack with non-nuclear forces in Central Europe will disappear in a mountain of scrapped military equipment under the most comprehensive disarmament treaty ever negotiated.More than 19,000 Soviet tanks, 30,000 heavy artillery pieces and 10,000 armored personnel carriers are likely to be dismantled. What's left of the once-mighty Warsaw Pact military machine, which in the end succeeded only in weakening Soviet bloc economies, will be subjected to international monitoring to foreclose future aggression.
NEWS
By DANIEL S. GREENBERG | February 26, 1991
For an excursion through warped priorities, look at the Bush administration's plans for the billions of dollars the federal government will spend next year on research and development.From no less an authority than President Bush, the Cold War is over, the gulf war is expected to be brief, and the major long-term challenge facing America is industrial competitiveness. Science and technology, he has repeatedly said, are indispensable ingredients of our economic strength. So, guess what? Defense is budgeted for 60 percent of all the money Washington will spend on R&D next year.
NEWS
By N.Y. Times News Service | November 29, 1993
WASHINGTON -- It's official: The Cold War is over.Without hoopla, Congress last week passed the Friendship Act. Borrowing from Russia's tradition of rewriting history books, the act renounces the very idea of an arch-enemy that President Ronald Reagan once called the Evil Empire and repeals laws that even suggest an adversarial relationship between the United States and the former Soviet Union.In its place, Congress embraced what the legislation calls the Emerging New Democracies and removed laws, regulations or policies that served to impede normal relations between them and Washington.
NEWS
October 25, 1990
The $288.3 billion defense authorization passed by Congress and accepted by the administration demonstrates that the diminishing Soviet threat is far more of a driving force in Washington's military thinking than the Iraqi challenge.Saddam Hussein's seizure of Kuwait has inflated the defense budget by about $5.5 billion more than it might have been. But more to the point, with the Soviet empire disintegrating, final authorization was an impressive $19 billion below what Defense Secretary Richard Cheney requested.
NEWS
By Ray McGovern | July 15, 2014
Absent from U.S. media encomia for recently deceased former Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard Shevardnadze is any mention of the historic deal he reached with his U.S. counterpart James Baker in 1990 ensuring that the Soviet empire would collapse "with a whimper, not a bang" (Mr. Baker's words). Mr. Baker keeps repeating that the Cold War "could not have ended peacefully without Shevardnadze. " But he and others are silent on the quid pro quo . The quid was Moscow's agreement to swallow the bitter pill of a reunited Germany in NATO; the quo was a U.S. promise not to "leapfrog" NATO over Germany farther East.
NEWS
By Nilay Saiya | April 7, 2014
The White House has responded to Russian actions in Crimea by taking a number of steps against Moscow: It has ramped up sanctions, verbally denounced the Kremlin's flouting of international law, effectively kicked Russia out of the G8 and given rhetorical support to Ukraine's new government. Such measures, however, are likely to deepen and prolong the crisis, not resolve it. The conventional view in Washington is that Russian President Vladimir Putin is a belligerent authoritarian intent upon expanding Russia's borders and confronting the West.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | March 28, 2014
Russian President Vladimir Putin's land grab of Crimea, with more threatened to come, has Republican neoconservatives eagerly lining up to denounce President Obama as a deplorably weak leader who settled for throwing snowballs at Putin rather than military muscle. Former Sen. Rick Santorum of Pennsylvania, laboring to keep his presidential aspirations flickering after a brief day in the sun in the 2012 Republican primaries, has temporarily doffed his anti-abortion hat to get in front of the parade.
NEWS
March 24, 2014
Western governments and specifically the Obama administration have been laughably naive about Russian President Vladimir Putin's reactions and intentions in Crimea and the Ukraine ( "Obama must take stronger measures to confront Putin," March 20). Mr. Putin's empire-building aspirations have now become transparent to the world. A dictator with an occasional perfunctory nod toward reform, one who grew up and came to power in the KGB during the Cold War, he has been unmoved by sanctions and diplomacy.
NEWS
Letter to The Aegis | January 30, 2014
Editor: I'm glad to see our elected leaders in Washington have approved a plan to allow the federal government to spend money through 2014. I was particularly pleased to see that Congress has restored some money for Head Start and other investments in the health of our communities and has refused to give the Pentagon all the money that it was asking for. Congress now has an opportunity to use the regular legislative process enshrined in...
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | January 27, 2014
Shades of Cold War anxiety were rekindled recently by reports that Air Force investigations were underway into alleged drug use, as well as cheating on preparedness tests, among nuclear missile launch officers working in the nation's pressure-cooker underground bunkers. Air Force Secretary Deborah Lee James told reporters that 11 officers at six such sites were suspected of illegal drug possession. According to the Associated Press, 34 of them at Malmstrom Air Force Base in Montana have had their security clearances suspended.
NEWS
By W.J. Hennigan, Tribune Newspapers | November 20, 2013
The A-10 Thunderbolt II, a snub-nosed ground-attack plane that the Maryland Air National Guard has flown in Iraq and Afghanistan, is the latest aircraft to find its way onto the Pentagon's endangered weapons list. Outfitted with a seven-barrel Gatling gun the size of a Volkswagen Beetle in its nose, the Cold War-era plane has a reputation for tearing apart armored tanks and clearing the way for troops on the ground with its massive 30-millimeter rounds of ammunition. But the unsightly plane - it's nicknamed the Warthog - has been in the cross hairs of Pentagon officials in recent years.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | November 15, 2013
Another Veterans Day has come and gone, celebrating the millions of Americans who served in the so-called War to End All Wars and all the wars since. The day was originally observed as Armistice Day, commemorating the all-quiet on the Western Front in France in November 1918. American troops had been involved there for barely more than a year and a half, and in actual combat in the trenches for only about eight months. The popular song kicking off the U.S. entry boasted, "We'll be over, we're coming over, and we won't come back till it's over, over there.
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